Second Edition
Matrices for casting type collected by Bishop Fell, part of his collection now known as the "Fell Types", shown in the OUP Museum
Diagram of the types of English vocabulary included in the OED, devised by James Murray, its first editor.
Oxford University Press building from Walton Street
Seven of the twenty volumes of the Oxford English Dictionary (second edition, 1989)
Frederick Furnivall, 1825–1910
James Murray in the Scriptorium at Banbury Road
A quotation slip as used in the compilation of the OED, illustrating the word flood.
The 78 Banbury Road, Oxford, house, erstwhile residence of James Murray, Editor of the Oxford English Dictionary
Editing an entry of the NOED using LEXX
A printout of the SGML markup used in the computerization of the OED, showing pencil annotations used to mark corrections.
A screenshot of the first version of the OED second edition CD-ROM software.
OED2 4th Edition CD-ROM.
The Compact Oxford English Dictionary (second edition, 1991).
Part of an entry in the 1991 compact edition, with a centimetre scale showing the very small type sizes used.
William Chester Minor, 1834–1920

The Oxford English Dictionary (OED) is the principal historical dictionary of the English language, published by Oxford University Press (OUP).

- Oxford English Dictionary

In 1879, he also took on the publication that led that process to its conclusion: the huge project that became the Oxford English Dictionary (OED).

- Oxford University Press

4 related topics

Alpha

Cambridge University Press

Publishing business of the University of Cambridge.

Publishing business of the University of Cambridge.

Logo on the front cover of "The Victorian Age by William Ralph Inge" used by Cambridge University Press
Cambridge University Press head office in Cambridge
Cambridge University Press building in Cambridge
The Pitt Building in Cambridge, which used to be the headquarters of Cambridge University Press, is now a conference venue
Cambridge University Press sign at the Cambridge HQ
Cambridge University Press's stand at the Frankfurt Book Fair 2018

Cambridge is one of the two privileged presses (the other being Oxford University Press).

It was in this period that the Press turned down what later became the Oxford English Dictionary – a proposal for which was brought to Cambridge by James Murray before he turned to Oxford.

Murray in the Scriptorium at Banbury Road, before 1910

James Murray (lexicographer)

Scottish lexicographer and philologist.

Scottish lexicographer and philologist.

Murray in the Scriptorium at Banbury Road, before 1910
The blue plaque at 78 Banbury Road
The erstwhile home of James Murray at 78 Banbury Road, Oxford: the blue plaque was installed in 2002

He was the primary editor of the Oxford English Dictionary (OED) from 1879 until his death.

On 26 April 1878, Murray was invited to Oxford to meet the Delegates of the Oxford University Press, with a view to his taking on the job of editor of a new dictionary of the English language, to replace Johnson's and to capture all the words then extant in the English speaking world in all their various shades of meaning.

Leather bound SOED Sixth Edition

Shorter Oxford English Dictionary

Leather bound SOED Sixth Edition

The Shorter Oxford English Dictionary (SOED) is an English language dictionary published by the Oxford University Press.

The SOED is a two-volume abridgement of the twenty-volume Oxford English Dictionary (OED).

The title page to the 1611 first edition of the Authorized Version of the Bible by Cornelis Boel shows the Apostles Peter and Paul seated centrally above the central text, which is flanked by Moses and Aaron. In the four corners sit Matthew, Mark, Luke and John, the traditionally attributed authors of the four gospels, with their symbolic animals. The rest of the Apostles (with Judas facing away) stand around Peter and Paul. At the very top is the Tetragrammaton "יְהֹוָה" written with Hebrew diacritics.

King James Version

English translation of the Christian Bible for the Church of England, which was commissioned in 1604 and published in 1611, by sponsorship of King James VI and I.

English translation of the Christian Bible for the Church of England, which was commissioned in 1604 and published in 1611, by sponsorship of King James VI and I.

The title page to the 1611 first edition of the Authorized Version of the Bible by Cornelis Boel shows the Apostles Peter and Paul seated centrally above the central text, which is flanked by Moses and Aaron. In the four corners sit Matthew, Mark, Luke and John, the traditionally attributed authors of the four gospels, with their symbolic animals. The rest of the Apostles (with Judas facing away) stand around Peter and Paul. At the very top is the Tetragrammaton "יְהֹוָה" written with Hebrew diacritics.
John Speed's Genealogies recorded in the Sacred Scriptures (1611), bound into first King James Bible in quarto size (1612)
William Tyndale translated the New Testament into English in 1525.
Archbishop Richard Bancroft was the "chief overseer" of the production of the Authorized Version.
The opening of the Epistle to the Hebrews of the 1611 edition of the Authorized Version shows the original typeface. Marginal notes reference variant translations and cross references to other Bible passages. Each chapter is headed by a précis of contents. There are decorative initial letters for each chapter, and a decorated headpiece to each book, but no illustrations in the text.
Title page of the 1760 Cambridge edition

For the possessive of the third person pronoun, the word its, first recorded in the Oxford English Dictionary in 1598, is avoided.

Other royal charters of similar antiquity grant Cambridge University Press and Oxford University Press the right to produce the Authorized Version independently of the Queen's Printer.