Oxford Movement

TractarianTractarian movementTractariansTractarianismPuseyiteOxfordAnglo-CatholicOxford schoolAnglo-Catholic Tractariancabal of Anglicans
The Oxford Movement was a movement of High Church members of the Church of England which eventually developed into Anglo-Catholicism.wikipedia
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Anglo-Catholicism

Anglo-CatholicAnglo-CatholicsAnglo Catholic
The Oxford Movement was a movement of High Church members of the Church of England which eventually developed into Anglo-Catholicism.
Particularly influential in the history of Anglo-Catholicism were the Caroline Divines of the seventeenth century and later the leaders of the Oxford Movement, which began at the University of Oxford in 1833 and ushered in a period of Anglican history known as the "Catholic Revival".

Tracts for the Times

TractariansTracts for Times
The movement's philosophy was known as Tractarianism after its series of publications, the Tracts for the Times, published from 1833 to 1841.
The Tracts for the Times were a series of 90 theological publications, varying in length from a few pages to book-length, produced by members of the English Oxford Movement, an Anglo-Catholic revival group, from 1833 to 1841.

High church

high-churchHigh AnglicanHigh
The Oxford Movement was a movement of High Church members of the Church of England which eventually developed into Anglo-Catholicism.
Because of its history, the term "high church" also refers to aspects of Anglicanism quite distinct from the Oxford Movement or Anglo-Catholicism.

John Henry Newman

Cardinal NewmanNewmanCardinal John Henry Newman
Tractarians were also disparagingly referred to as "Newmanites" (before 1845) and "Puseyites" (after 1845) after two prominent Tractarians, John Henry Newman and Edward Bouverie Pusey.
He became known as a leader of, and an able polemicist for the Oxford Movement, an influential and controversial grouping of Anglicans who wished to return to the Church of England many Catholic beliefs and liturgical rituals from before the English Reformation.

John Keble

KebleKeble Mass
Other well-known Tractarians included John Keble, Charles Marriott, Richard Froude, Robert Wilberforce, Isaac Williams and William Palmer.
John Keble (25 April 1792 – 29 March 1866) was an English churchman and poet, one of the leaders of the Oxford Movement.

University of Oxford

Oxford UniversityOxfordUniversity
The movement, whose original devotees were mostly associated with the University of Oxford, argued for the reinstatement of some older Christian traditions of faith and their inclusion into Anglican liturgy and theology.
The mid-19th century saw the impact of the Oxford Movement (1833–1845), led among others by the future Cardinal John Henry Newman.

Edward Bouverie Pusey

Edward PuseyE. B. PuseyPusey
Tractarians were also disparagingly referred to as "Newmanites" (before 1845) and "Puseyites" (after 1845) after two prominent Tractarians, John Henry Newman and Edward Bouverie Pusey.
He was one of the main promoters of the Oxford Movement.

Hurrell Froude

Richard Hurrell FroudeFroudeHurrell
Other well-known Tractarians included John Keble, Charles Marriott, Richard Froude, Robert Wilberforce, Isaac Williams and William Palmer.
Richard Hurrell Froude (25 March 1803 – 28 February 1836) was an Anglican priest and an early leader of the Oxford Movement.

Isaac Williams

Other well-known Tractarians included John Keble, Charles Marriott, Richard Froude, Robert Wilberforce, Isaac Williams and William Palmer.
The Reverend Isaac Williams (1802–1865) was a prominent member of the Oxford Movement (or "Tractarians"), a student and disciple of John Keble and, like the other members of the movement, associated with Oxford University.

Robert Wilberforce

Robert Isaac WilberforceRobert
Other well-known Tractarians included John Keble, Charles Marriott, Richard Froude, Robert Wilberforce, Isaac Williams and William Palmer.
He was second son of abolitionist William Wilberforce, and active in the Oxford Movement.

Anglicanism

AnglicanAnglican ChurchAnglicans
They thought of Anglicanism as one of three branches of the "one holy, catholic, and apostolic" Christian church.
The propriety of this legislation was bitterly contested by the Oxford Movement (Tractarians), who in response developed a vision of Anglicanism as religious tradition deriving ultimately from the ecumenical councils of the patristic church.

Charles Marriott (priest)

Charles MarriottCharles Marriott (Tractarian)
Other well-known Tractarians included John Keble, Charles Marriott, Richard Froude, Robert Wilberforce, Isaac Williams and William Palmer.
Charles Marriott (1811–1858) was an Anglican priest, a fellow of Oriel College, Oxford, and one of the members of the Oxford Movement.

Branch theory

branchbranchesdivided church
They thought of Anglicanism as one of three branches of the "one holy, catholic, and apostolic" Christian church.
The theory was then popularized during the Oxford Movement, particularly through the work of the Tractarians.

William Palmer (theologian)

William Palmer
Other well-known Tractarians included John Keble, Charles Marriott, Richard Froude, Robert Wilberforce, Isaac Williams and William Palmer.
He was an early supporter and influence in the Oxford Movement, but was superseded by John Henry Newman and Edward Pusey.

National Apostasy

John Keble criticised these proposals as "National Apostasy" in his Assize Sermon in Oxford in 1833.
The sermon has traditionally been considered as the beginning of the Oxford Movement of High Church Anglicans.

Hymns Ancient and Modern

Common PraiseNorwich Books and MusicAncient and Modern Hymn
One of the main contributions that resulted from Tractarianism is the hymnbook entitled Hymns Ancient and Modern which was published in 1861.
Hymns Ancient and Modern is a hymnal in common use within the Church of England, a result of the efforts of the Oxford Movement.

Liturgical Movement

liturgical renewalliturgical renewal movementLiturgical
In particular it brought the insights of the Liturgical Movement into the life of the church.
A similar reform in the Church of England and Anglican Communion, known as the Oxford Movement, began to change theology and liturgy in the United Kingdom and United States in the mid-nineteenth century.

Anglican religious order

Anglican sisterhoodAnglican religious ordersreligious order
The Oxford Movement resulted in the establishment of Anglican religious orders, both of men and of women.
Although the Ferrar community remained a part of the Anglican ethos (Bishop Francis Turner composed a memoir of Nicholas Ferrar prior to his death in 1700), not until the mid-nineteenth century with the Oxford Movement and the revival of Anglican religious orders did Little Gidding reach the consciousness of the average Anglican parishioner.

Ritualism in the Church of England

ritualismritualistritualistic practices
This led to controversies within churches that resulted in court cases, as in the dispute about ritualism.
It was often used to describe the second generation of the Oxford Movement/Anglo-Catholic/High Church revival of the 19th century which sought to reintroduce into the Church of England a range of Catholic liturgical practices.

Tract 90

Tract XC90
In the final tract, "Tract 90", Newman argued that the doctrines of the Roman Catholic Church, as defined by the Council of Trent, were compatible with the Thirty-Nine Articles of the 16th-century Church of England.
It is the most famous and the most controversial of the Tracts for the Times produced by the first generation of the Anglo-Catholic Oxford Movement.

Rivington's Theological Library

Theological LibraryRivington
They were issued through Rivington's company with the imprint of the Holyrood Press.
His quest for contributors took him to Oxford in 1832, at a pivotal moment for what would become the Tractarian movement.

Edward Badeley

Edward Lowth Badeley
Edward Lowth Badeley (1803 or 1804 – 1868) was an English ecclesiastical lawyer and member of the Oxford Movement who was involved in some of the most notorious cases of the 19th century.

Library of the Fathers

Library of Fathers of the Holy Catholic Church
Apart from the Tracts for the Times, the group began a collection of translations of the Church Fathers, which they termed the Library of the Fathers.
Edited by Edward Bouverie Pusey and others including John Keble and John Henry Newman, this series of editions is closely associated with the origins of the Oxford Movement.

Church of Ireland

AnglicanProtestantIrish Anglican
The immediate impetus for the Tractarian movement was a perceived attack by the reforming Whig administration on the structure and revenues of the Church of Ireland (the established church in Ireland), with the Irish Church Temporalities Bill (1833).
The implications of government legislating church governance was a contributory factor in the Oxford Movement and had wide repercussions for the Anglican Communion.

James Hope-Scott

James Robert Hope-ScottLady Victoria Alexandrina Fitzalan-HowardJ. R. Hope Scott
James Robert Hope-Scott (15 July 1812 – 29 April 1873) was a British barrister and Tractarian.