Přemyslid dynasty

PřemyslidPřemyslidsPremyslid dynastyHouse of PřemyslHouse of PřemyslidPremyslidPremyslidsPřemyslPřemysl dynastydynasty carrying the same name
The Přemyslid dynasty or House of Přemyslid (Přemyslovci, Premysliden, Przemyślidzi) was a Czech royal dynasty which reigned in the Duchy of Bohemia and later Kingdom of Bohemia and Margraviate of Moravia (9th century–1306), as well as in parts of Poland (including Silesia), Hungary, and Austria.wikipedia
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Kingdom of Bohemia

BohemiaBohemianBohemian Kingdom
The Přemyslid dynasty or House of Přemyslid (Přemyslovci, Premysliden, Przemyślidzi) was a Czech royal dynasty which reigned in the Duchy of Bohemia and later Kingdom of Bohemia and Margraviate of Moravia (9th century–1306), as well as in parts of Poland (including Silesia), Hungary, and Austria.
The kingdom was established by the Přemyslid dynasty in the 12th century from Duchy of Bohemia, later ruled by the House of Luxembourg, the Jagiellonian dynasty, and since 1526 by the House of Habsburg and its successor house Habsburg-Lorraine.

Duchy of Bohemia

BohemiaBohemianHistory of the Czech lands in the Middle Ages
The Přemyslid dynasty or House of Přemyslid (Přemyslovci, Premysliden, Przemyślidzi) was a Czech royal dynasty which reigned in the Duchy of Bohemia and later Kingdom of Bohemia and Margraviate of Moravia (9th century–1306), as well as in parts of Poland (including Silesia), Hungary, and Austria.
While the Bohemian dukes of the Přemyslid dynasty, at first ruling at Prague Castle and Levý Hradec, brought further estates under their control, the Christianization initiated by Saints Cyril and Methodius was continued by the Frankish bishops of Regensburg and Passau.

Vratislaus I, Duke of Bohemia

Vratislaus IVratislaus I of BohemiaVratislaus
In the following century, the Přemyslids also ruled over Silesia and founded the city of Wroclaw (German: Breslau), derived from the name of a Bohemian duke, Vratislaus I, father of Saint Wenceslaus.
888 – 13 February 921), a member of the Přemyslid dynasty, was Duke of Bohemia from 915 until his death.

Prague

Prague, Czech RepublicPrague, CzechoslovakiaPraha
The dynasty's origin dates back to the 9th century, when the Přemyslids ruled a tiny territory around Prague, populated by the Czech tribe of the Western Slavs.
The legendary origins of Prague attribute its foundation to the 8th-century Czech duchess and prophetess Libuše and her husband, Přemysl, founder of the Přemyslid dynasty.

Wrocław

BreslauWroclawBreslau (Wrocław)
In the following century, the Přemyslids also ruled over Silesia and founded the city of Wroclaw (German: Breslau), derived from the name of a Bohemian duke, Vratislaus I, father of Saint Wenceslaus.
Traditionally, the city is believed to be named after Duke Vratislav I of Bohemia from the Czech Přemyslid dynasty, who ruled the region between 915 and 921.

Margraviate of Moravia

MoraviaMargrave of MoraviaMoravian
The Přemyslid dynasty or House of Přemyslid (Přemyslovci, Premysliden, Przemyślidzi) was a Czech royal dynasty which reigned in the Duchy of Bohemia and later Kingdom of Bohemia and Margraviate of Moravia (9th century–1306), as well as in parts of Poland (including Silesia), Hungary, and Austria.
Temporarily ruled by King Bolesław I Chrobry of Poland from 999 until 1019, Moravia was re-conquered by Duke Oldřich of Bohemia and ultimately became a land of the Crown of Saint Wenceslas held by the Přemyslid dynasty.

Wenceslaus I, Duke of Bohemia

St. WenceslasSaint WenceslasSaint Wenceslaus
In the following century, the Přemyslids also ruled over Silesia and founded the city of Wroclaw (German: Breslau), derived from the name of a Bohemian duke, Vratislaus I, father of Saint Wenceslaus.
Wenceslaus was the son of Vratislaus I, Duke of Bohemia from the Přemyslid dynasty.

Kingdom of Poland (1025–1385)

Kingdom of PolandPolandPolish
He in turn looted Poland, including the cities of Krakow and Gniezno (1038), where he obtained the relics of St. Adalbert.
Poland even came under the influence of the Přemyslid kings of Bohemia, whose dynasty died out before they could gain a stable foothold in Poland.

Soběslav I, Duke of Bohemia

Soběslav ISoběslav I of BohemiaSoběslav
Vratislav's son Sobeslaus I destroyed the Imperial army of King Lothar III in the Battle of Chlumec in 1126.
He was a member of the Přemyslid dynasty, the youngest son of Vratislaus II (d.

Ottokar II of Bohemia

Ottokar IIPřemysl Otakar IIOtakar II of Bohemia
King Přemysl Ottokar II, son of Wenceslas I, earned the nickname "Iron and Golden King" because of his military power and wealth.
Ottokar II (Přemysl Otakar II.; c. 1233 – 26 August 1278), the Iron and Golden King, was a member of the Přemyslid dynasty who reigned as King of Bohemia from 1253 until his death in 1278.

Ottokar I of Bohemia

Ottokar IPřemysl Otakar IOttokar
Finally, on his ascension to the throne, Ottokar I began a series of changes that brought Bohemia out of crisis, and began a period of success that lasted for nearly 220 years.
He was a member of the Přemyslid dynasty.

Battle on the Marchfeld

Battle of MarchfeldBattle of Dürnkrut and JedenspeigenDürnkrut
In the Battle of Marchfeld (1278), Ottokar clashed with Imperial and Hungarian armies yet he was killed in battle himself.
The opponents were a Bohemian (Czech) army led by the Přemyslid king Ottokar II of Bohemia and the German army under the German king Rudolph I of Habsburg in alliance with King Ladislaus IV of Hungary.

Rudolf I of Germany

Rudolph I of GermanyRudolph of HabsburgRudolf I
The representative of Habsburgs Rudolf was elected as King of Romans.
Originally a Swabian count, he was the first Habsburg to acquire the duchies of Austria and Styria in opposition to his mighty rival, the Přemyslid king Ottokar II of Bohemia, whom he defeated in the 1278 Battle on the Marchfeld.

Bohemia

BohemianBöhmenAustrian Bohemia
Gradually they expanded, conquering the region of Bohemia, located in the Bohemian basin where it was not threatened by the expansion of the Frankish Empire.
A native monarchy arose to the throne, and Bohemia came under the rule of the Přemyslid dynasty, which would rule the Czech lands for the next several hundred years.

Adalbert of Prague

Saint AdalbertSt. AdalbertAdalbert
He in turn looted Poland, including the cities of Krakow and Gniezno (1038), where he obtained the relics of St. Adalbert.
985–987), and according to David Kalhous belonged to the Přemyslid dynasty.

Charles IV, Holy Roman Emperor

Charles IVEmperor Charles IVCharles IV of Luxembourg
On the distaff side, however, the dynasty continued, and in 1355, Bohemian king Charles IV, the grandson of Wenceslaus II, was crowned Holy Roman Emperor in Rome.
He was a member of the House of Luxembourg from his father's side and the Czech House of Přemyslid from his mother's side; he emphasized the latter due to his lifelong affinity for the Czech side of his inheritance, and also because his direct ancestors in the Přemyslid line included two saints.

Libuše

LibussaPrincess Libuše
The name of the dynasty, according to Cosmas in his Chronica Boemorum (1119), comes from its legendary founder, Přemysl, husband of duchess Libuše.
, Libussa, Libushe or, historically Lubossa, is a legendary ancestor of the Přemyslid dynasty and the Czech people as a whole.

Přemysl the Ploughman

PřemyslPřemysl, the PloughmanPremysl
The name of the dynasty, according to Cosmas in his Chronica Boemorum (1119), comes from its legendary founder, Přemysl, husband of duchess Libuše.
Přemysl the Ploughman ( Přemysl Oráč; English: Premysl, Przemysl or Primislaus) was the legendary husband of Libuše, and ancestor of the Přemyslid dynasty, containing the line of princes (dukes) and kings which ruled in the Lands of the Bohemian Crown from 873 or earlier until the murder of Wenceslaus III in 1306.

West Slavs

West SlavicWestern SlavsSlavic
The dynasty's origin dates back to the 9th century, when the Přemyslids ruled a tiny territory around Prague, populated by the Czech tribe of the Western Slavs.
The precursors of the Czechs (i.e. Bohemians) migrated into Bohemia in the late 6th century and had established various fiefdoms by the 10th century when their rulers eventually became vassals (1002) of the Holy Roman Emperors.

Wenceslaus II of Bohemia

Wenceslaus IIWenceslas IIKing Wenceslas II
Ottokar's son King Wenceslaus II was just seven when he came to the throne of Bohemia.
He was a member of the Přemyslid dynasty.

Nezamysl

Nezamysl was the first of the seven Bohemian mythical princes between the (also mythical) founder of the Přemyslid dynasty Přemysl the Ploughman and the first historical prince Bořivoj.

Vojen

Vojen was the third of the seven Bohemian mythical princes between the (also mythical) founder of the Přemyslid dynasty Přemysl the Ploughman and the first historical prince Bořivoj.

Vnislav

Vnislav was the fourth of the seven Bohemian mythical princes between the (also mythical) founder of the Přemyslid dynasty Přemysl the Ploughman and the first historical prince Bořivoj.

Bořivoj I, Duke of Bohemia

BořivojBořivoj IBorivoj I
The first historically-documented Přemyslid duke was Bořivoj I (867).
Bořivoj I (, Borzivogius, c. 852 – c. 889) was the first historically documented Duke of Bohemia and progenitor of the Přemyslid dynasty.

Neklan

Neklan was the sixth of the seven Bohemian mythical princes between the (also mythical) founder of the Přemyslid dynasty Přemysl the Ploughman and the first historical prince Bořivoj.