A report on Přemyslid dynasty

Last three Přemyslid kings according to illumination from the Chronicon Aulae regiae: Přemysl Ottokar II (one crown – Bohemia), Wenceslaus II (two crowns – Bohemia and Poland) and Wenceslaus III (three crowns – Hungary, Bohemia and Poland)
Bohemian king Wenceslaus II as the King of Poland, a romantic drawing by Jan Matejko (1892)
Maximum extent of the kingdom under Ottokar II, c. 1276
Premyslid Dynasty Family Tree
Territory under the control of the Přemyslids, c. 1301:
Kingdom of Bohemia
Kingdom of Poland
Probable extent of territory under control of Wenceslaus III in Hungary
Vassals

Bohemian royal dynasty which reigned in the Duchy of Bohemia and later Kingdom of Bohemia and Margraviate of Moravia (9th century–1306), as well as in parts of Poland (including Silesia), Hungary, and Austria.

- Přemyslid dynasty
Last three Přemyslid kings according to illumination from the Chronicon Aulae regiae: Přemysl Ottokar II (one crown – Bohemia), Wenceslaus II (two crowns – Bohemia and Poland) and Wenceslaus III (three crowns – Hungary, Bohemia and Poland)

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Kingdom of Bohemia

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Medieval and early modern monarchy in Central Europe, the predecessor of the modern Czech Republic.

Medieval and early modern monarchy in Central Europe, the predecessor of the modern Czech Republic.

The Kingdom of Bohemia and the Lands of the Bohemian Crown within the Holy Roman Empire (1618)
Territories ruled by Ottokar II of Bohemia in 1273
The Kingdom of Bohemia and the Lands of the Bohemian Crown within the Holy Roman Empire (1618)
The oldest depiction of coat of arms of Bohemia, castle Gozzoburg in Krems
The Kingdom of Bohemia and the Lands of the Bohemian Crown within the Holy Roman Empire (1618)
Wenceslaus II as depicted in the Codex Manesse
Territories under the control of the Přemyslid dynasty around 1301
Prague Castle, the ancient seat of Bohemian dukes and kings, Roman kings and emperors, and after 1918 the office of the Czechoslovak and Czech presidents
Kutná Hora, a medieval silver-mining centre, was once the second most important town of the kingdom.
Jan Žižka, the leader of the Hussites
The Hussite wagon fort
The Bohemian Diet in 1564
Coat of arms of the Austrian province of Bohemia by Hugo Gerard Ströhl
Ströhl's unofficial artwork of the Coat of arms of the kingdom (with the Crown of Saint Wenceslas, Bohemian Crown Jewels part)
Railway network of Bohemia in 1883
Bohemia and Lands of the Bohemian Crown in 1618
Administrative divisions of Bohemia in 1712
Administrative divisions of Bohemia in 1847
Administrative divisions of Bohemia in 1893

The kingdom was established by the Přemyslid dynasty in the 12th century from the Duchy of Bohemia, later ruled by the House of Luxembourg, the Jagiellonian dynasty, and from 1526 the House of Habsburg and its successor, the House of Habsburg-Lorraine.

Duchy of Bohemia

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Monarchy and a principality of the Holy Roman Empire in Central Europe during the Early and High Middle Ages.

Monarchy and a principality of the Holy Roman Empire in Central Europe during the Early and High Middle Ages.

Duchy of Bohemia within the Holy Roman Empire, 11th century
Great Moravia under the rule of Svatopluk I (871–894)
Duchy of Bohemia within the Holy Roman Empire, 11th century
Duchy of Bohemia under Boleslaus I. and Boleslaus II.
Duchy of Bohemia within Central Europe in 919-1125
Territory under the control of the Přemyslid dynasty around 1301

While the Bohemian dukes of the Přemyslid dynasty, at first ruling at Prague Castle and Levý Hradec, brought further estates under their control, the Christianization initiated by Saints Cyril and Methodius was continued by the Frankish bishops of Regensburg and Passau.

Margraviate of Moravia

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One of the Lands of the Bohemian Crown within the Holy Roman Empire existing from 1182 to 1918.

One of the Lands of the Bohemian Crown within the Holy Roman Empire existing from 1182 to 1918.

The Margraviate of Moravia and the Lands of the Bohemian Crown within the Holy Roman Empire (1618)
Sitting of the Moravian Diet, 17th century
The Margraviate of Moravia and the Lands of the Bohemian Crown within the Holy Roman Empire (1618)
The former Moravian Diet building. It now houses the Constitutional Court of the Czech Republic.
The Margraviate of Moravia and the Lands of the Bohemian Crown within the Holy Roman Empire (1618)
The unadopted coat of arms as a heraldic artwork made by Hugo Gerard Ströhl
Moravian and Austrian Silesian districts, 1897
Judicial districts (Gerichtsbezirke) in Moravia

Temporarily ruled by King Bolesław I Chrobry of Poland from 999 until 1019, Moravia was re-conquered by Duke Oldřich of Bohemia and ultimately became a land of the Crown of Saint Wenceslas held by the Přemyslid dynasty.

Charles IV in the Votive Panel of Jan Očko of Vlašim

Charles IV, Holy Roman Emperor

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The first King of Bohemia to become Holy Roman Emperor.

The first King of Bohemia to become Holy Roman Emperor.

Charles IV in the Votive Panel of Jan Očko of Vlašim
Coat of arms of the House of Luxembourg–Bohemia
Arms of Charles IV as Holy Roman Emperor
Lands of the Bohemian Crown ruled by Charles IV
Bust of Charles IV in St. Vitus Cathedral, 1370s
The Golden Bull of 1356
Charles's possessions at the signing of the Golden Bull of 1356.
Meeting with Charles V of France in Paris in 1378, from a fifteenth-century manuscript in the Bibliothèque de l'Arsenal
Statue of Charles IV near Charles Bridge (1848), Prague, by Ernst Julius Hähnel
100-CZK banknote
Charles and his first wife, Blanche

He was a member of the House of Luxembourg from his father's side and the Bohemian House of Přemyslid from his mother's side; he emphasized the latter due to his lifelong affinity for the Bohemian side of his inheritance, and also because his direct ancestors in the Přemyslid line included two saints.

Ottokar's royal seal

Ottokar II of Bohemia

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Ottokar's royal seal
At the peak of his power, Ottokar II's realm stretched from the Sudetes to the Adriatic Sea.
In the painting, Přemysl Otakar II: The Union of Slavic Dynasties (1924), part of Alphonse Mucha's 20-canvas work The Slav Epic, Ottokar is depicted at his niece's wedding celebration, forging alliances with other Slavic rulers in attendance.
Burial crown of Ottokar II of Bohemia at Prague Castle
Tomb of Ottokar II in St. Vitus Cathedral, Prague
Ottokar II Přemysl in a miniature from the Gelnhausen Codex
Ottokar is accepted as Duke of Austria in 1251. A painting by Jan Goth, 1936
Depiction in the Zbraslav Chronicle by Peter of Zittau, 14th century
Otacarvs II. rex, statue by Ludwig von Schwanthaler (1847) placed at the National Museum in Prague (symbol of keep at his right foot is reminiscent of the many castles and towns, which he founded)

Ottokar II (Přemysl Otakar II.; c. 1233, in Městec Králové, Bohemia – 26 August 1278, in Dürnkrut, Lower Austria), the Iron and Golden King, was a member of the Přemyslid dynasty who reigned as King of Bohemia from 1253 until his death in 1278.

Portrayal in Codex Manesse

Wenceslaus II of Bohemia

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King of Bohemia (1278–1305), Duke of Cracow (1291–1305), and King of Poland (1300–1305).

King of Bohemia (1278–1305), Duke of Cracow (1291–1305), and King of Poland (1300–1305).

Portrayal in Codex Manesse
Territory under the control of the Přemyslids, c. 1301

He was a member of the Přemyslid dynasty.

Prague

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Capital and largest city in the Czech Republic, and the historical capital of Bohemia.

Capital and largest city in the Czech Republic, and the historical capital of Bohemia.

The mythological princess Libuše prophesies the glory of Prague.
A model representing Prague Castle and its surroundings in the year 1000
The St. Vitus Cathedral in Prague was founded in 1344
The Prague astronomical clock was first installed in 1410, making it the third-oldest astronomical clock in the world and the oldest one still working.
Depiction of the "Prague Banner" (municipal flag dated to the 16th century).
The coat of arms of Prague (1649).
Monument to František Palacký, a significant member of the Czech National Revival
Statue of Tomáš Garrigue Masaryk near Prague Castle
Prague liberated by the Red Army in May 1945
Velvet Revolution in November 1989
Prague high-rise buildings at Pankrác
Prague seen from satellite
Map of Prague cadastral areas and administrative districts
Mayor Zdeněk Hřib
Veletržní palác houses the largest collection of National Gallery art
Rudolfinum, a concert and exhibition hall
Prague Congress Centre has hosted the IMF-WBG meeting and NATO summit
U Medvídků (A.D. 1466), one of the oldest pubs in Europe
Žižkov Television Tower with crawling "babies"
Na příkopě, the most expensive street among the states of V4
Tourism is a significant part of the city's economy
Wenceslas Square
The Gothic Powder Tower
Milunić's and Gehry's Dancing House
Library of the Strahov Monastery
Franz Kafka monument, next to the Spanish synagogue
The Child Jesus of Prague, religious statue and shrine
Charles University, founded in 1348, was the first university in Central Europe
University of Economics, Prague
Headquarters of the Galileo system in Prague's Holešovice
Škoda 15 T, tram of the Prague tram system
SOR NB 18 of the Prague bus service
Staroměstská metro station of Prague Metro
Barrandov Bridge, part of the Prague Inner Ring Road
Prague main train station is the largest and busiest train station in the country
Václav Havel Airport Prague is one of the busiest airports in central Europe, carrying 16.8 millions of passengers in 2018
The O2 Arena was built to host the 2004 Men's World Ice Hockey Championships
Petřín Lookout Tower, an observation tower inspired by the Eiffel Tower in Paris, France, and built at Petřín hill.
The Charles Bridge is a historic bridge from the 14th century
Prague Castle is the biggest ancient castle in the world
Old Town Square featuring Church of Our Lady before Týn and Old Town City Hall with Prague Orloj
St. Nicholas Church in Malá Strana is the best example of the Baroque style in Prague
Vyšehrad fortress contains Basilica of St Peter and St Paul, the Vyšehrad Cemetery and the oldest Rotunda of St. Martin
View of Pařížská St. from Letná Park
Míru Square with Vinohrady Theatre and Church of St. Ludmila
National Theatre offers opera, drama, ballet and other performances
Výstaviště compound contains Průmyslový palác, Křižík's Light Fountain and host funfair Lunapark
Old New Synagogue is Europe's oldest active synagogue. Legend has Golem lying in the loft
National Monument on Vítkov Hill, the statue of Jan Žižka is the third largest bronze equestrian statue in the world
Prague Zoo, selected in 2015 as the fourth best zoo in the world by TripAdvisor

Another view to the origin of name is also related to the Czech word práh (with the meaning of a threshold) and a legendary etymology connects the name of the city with princess Libuše, prophetess and a wife of mythical founder of the Přemyslid dynasty.

Vratislaus I, Duke of Bohemia

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Vratislaus (or Wratislaus) I (Vratislav I.; c. 888 – 13 February 921), a member of the Přemyslid dynasty, was Duke of Bohemia from 915 until his death.

Fresco in the Znojmo Rotunda, 12th-century

Boleslaus II, Duke of Bohemia

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Boleslaus II the Pious (Boleslav II.

Boleslaus II the Pious (Boleslav II.

Fresco in the Znojmo Rotunda, 12th-century
Bohemian lands during the reign of Boleslaus I and Boleslaus II
St Adalbert of Prague pleads with Boleslaus II for the release of Christian slaves, Gniezno Cathedral door - detail

Pobożny; c. 927/928 – 7 February 999), a member of the Přemyslid dynasty, was Duke of Bohemia from 972 until his death.

Bohemia

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Westernmost and largest historical region of the Czech Republic.

Westernmost and largest historical region of the Czech Republic.

An 1892 map showing Bohemia proper outlined in pink, Moravia in yellow, and Austrian Silesia in orange
The coat of arms of the Přemyslid dynasty (until 1253–1262)
The coat of arms of the Kingdom of Bohemia
The radical Hussites became known as Taborites, after the town of Tábor that became their center
Bohemia as the heart of Europa regina; Sebastian Münster, Basel, 1570
Bohemia (westernmost area) in Czechoslovakia 1918–1938
Linguistic map of interwar Czechoslovakia (c. 1930)
Bohemian city Karlovy Vary
A panorama of Kłodzko, the capital city of Kłodzko Land, which is referred to as "Little Prague"
Lands of the Bohemian Crown (until 1635), map by Josef Pekař, 1921

A native monarchy arose to the throne, and Bohemia came under the rule of the Přemyslid dynasty, which would rule the Czech lands for the next several hundred years.