P. G. T. Beauregard

P.G.T. BeauregardPierre G. T. BeauregardBeauregardPierre BeauregardPierre G.T. BeauregardPierre Gustave Toutant BeauregardGeneral BeauregardG.T. BeauregardG. T. BeauregardGeneral P. G. T. Beauregard
Pierre Gustave Toutant-Beauregard (May 28, 1818 – February 20, 1893) was an American military officer who was the first prominent general of the Confederate States Army during the American Civil War.wikipedia
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Confederate States Army

ConfederateConfederate ArmyConfederates
Pierre Gustave Toutant-Beauregard (May 28, 1818 – February 20, 1893) was an American military officer who was the first prominent general of the Confederate States Army during the American Civil War.
Under orders from Confederate President Jefferson Davis, C.S. troops under the command of General P. G. T. Beauregard bombarded Fort Sumter on April 12–13, 1861, forcing its capitulation on April 14.

First Battle of Bull Run

First Battle of ManassasFirst Bull RunBull Run
Three months later he won the First Battle of Bull Run near Manassas, Virginia.
Gen. P. G. T. Beauregard camped near Manassas Junction.

Battle of Shiloh

ShilohBattle of Pittsburg LandingHornet's Nest
Beauregard commanded armies in the Western Theater, including at the Battle of Shiloh in Tennessee, and the Siege of Corinth in northern Mississippi.
A Union force known as the Army of the Tennessee (Major General Ulysses S. Grant) had moved via the Tennessee River deep into Tennessee and was encamped principally at Pittsburg Landing on the west bank of the Tennessee River, where the Confederate Army of Mississippi (General Albert Sidney Johnston, P. G. T. Beauregard second-in-command) launched a surprise attack on Grant's army from its base in Corinth, Mississippi.

Siege of Corinth

CorinthBattle of FarmingtonBattle of Farmington, Mississippi
Beauregard commanded armies in the Western Theater, including at the Battle of Shiloh in Tennessee, and the Siege of Corinth in northern Mississippi.
A collection of Union forces under the overall command of Major General Henry Halleck engaged in a month-long siege of the city, whose Confederate occupants were commanded by General P.G.T. Beauregard.

Battle of Fort Sumter

Fort Sumterbombardment of Fort Sumterattack on Fort Sumter
He commanded the defenses of Charleston, South Carolina, at the start of the Civil War at Fort Sumter on April 12, 1861.
In March, Brigadier General P. G. T. Beauregard, the first general officer of the newly formed Confederate States Army, was placed in command of Confederate forces in Charleston.

Joseph E. Johnston

JohnstonJoseph JohnstonJoseph Eggleston Johnston
In April 1865, Beauregard and his commander, General Joseph E. Johnston, convinced Davis and the remaining cabinet members that the war needed to end.
He was the senior Confederate commander at the First Battle of Bull Run in July 1861, but the victory is usually credited to his subordinate, P.G.T. Beauregard.

American Civil War

Civil WarU.S. Civil WarUnited States Civil War
Pierre Gustave Toutant-Beauregard (May 28, 1818 – February 20, 1893) was an American military officer who was the first prominent general of the Confederate States Army during the American Civil War.
Anderson gave a conditional reply that the Confederate government rejected, and Davis ordered General P. G. T. Beauregard to attack the fort before a relief expedition could arrive.

Charleston, South Carolina

CharlestonCharleston, SCCharles Town
He commanded the defenses of Charleston, South Carolina, at the start of the Civil War at Fort Sumter on April 12, 1861.
The first full battle of the American Civil War occurred on April 12, 1861, when shore batteries under the command of General Beauregard opened fire on the US Army-held Fort Sumter in Charleston harbor.

Western Theater of the American Civil War

Western TheaterWesternWest
Beauregard commanded armies in the Western Theater, including at the Battle of Shiloh in Tennessee, and the Siege of Corinth in northern Mississippi.
General P.G.T. Beauregard had arrived from the East to report to Johnston in February, and he commanded all Confederate forces between the Mississippi and Tennessee Rivers, which effectively divided the unity of command so that Johnston controlled only a small force at Murfreesboro, Tennessee.

Louisiana State Lottery Company

Louisiana Lottery Louisiana LotteryLouisiana State Lottery
Following his military career, Beauregard returned to Louisiana, where he advocated black civil rights and black suffrage, served as a railroad executive, and became wealthy as a promoter of the Louisiana Lottery.
Former Confederate Generals P.G.T. Beauregard and Jubal Anderson Early held the drawings.

Battle of Chapultepec

ChapultepecStorming of Chapultepecassault on Chapultepec
He was appointed brevet captain for the battles of Contreras and Churubusco and major for Chapultepec, where he was wounded in the shoulder and thigh.
A young lieutenant, P. G. T. Beauregard, gave a textbook speech that persuaded General Franklin Pierce to change his vote in favor of the western attack.

Jefferson Davis

Jeff DavisDavisJefferson Finis Davis
His influence over Confederate strategy was lessened by his poor professional relationships with President Jefferson Davis and other senior generals and officials.
On March 1, 1861, Davis appointed General P. G. T. Beauregard to command all Confederate troops in the vicinity of Charleston, South Carolina, where state officials prepared to take possession of Fort Sumter.

President of the Confederate States of America

Confederate PresidentPresidentPresident of the Confederate States
His influence over Confederate strategy was lessened by his poor professional relationships with President Jefferson Davis and other senior generals and officials.
At Greensboro, North Carolina, on April 12 the Cabinet met with Generals Joseph E. Johnston and Pierre G. T. Beauregard and discussed surrender of Johnston's Army of Tennessee to Union General William Tecumseh Sherman then in nearby North Carolina moving north from Savannah through the Carolinas destroying, pillaging and burning everything in its path including Columbia the South Carolina state capital city.

Fort Sumter

SumterFort SumpterFort Sumter, South Carolina
One of his instructors was Robert Anderson, who later became the commander of Fort Sumter and surrendered to Beauregard at the start of the Civil War.
Over the next few months repeated calls for evacuation of Fort Sumter from the government of South Carolina and then from Confederate Brigadier General P. G. T. Beauregard were ignored.

Louisiana Creole people

CreoleLouisiana CreoleCreoles
Beauregard was born at the "Contreras" sugar-cane plantation in St. Bernard Parish, Louisiana, about 20 mi outside New Orleans, to a French Creole family.
Some white Creoles, such as the ex-Confederate general Pierre G. T. Beauregard, advocated against racism, and became proponents of Black Civil Rights and Black suffrage, involving themselves in the creation of the Louisiana Unification Movement that called for equal rights for blacks, denounced discrimination, and the abandonment of segregation.

Robert Anderson (Civil War)

Robert AndersonMajor Robert AndersonMajor Anderson
One of his instructors was Robert Anderson, who later became the commander of Fort Sumter and surrendered to Beauregard at the start of the Civil War.
The artillery attack was commanded by Brig. Gen. P. G. T. Beauregard, who had been Anderson's student at West Point.

Irvin McDowell

Irwin McDowellMcDowellGeneral Irvin McDowell
Gen. Irvin McDowell (one of Beauregard's West Point classmates) against the Confederate railroad junction at Manassas.
Irvin initially attended the College de Troyes in France before graduating from the United States Military Academy in 1838, where one of his classmates was P. G. T. Beauregard, his future adversary at First Bull Run.

Corinth, Mississippi

CorinthCorinth, MSCorinth, Miss.
The two generals planned the concentration of Confederate forces to oppose the advance of Maj. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant before he could combine his army with that of Maj. Gen. Don Carlos Buell in a thrust up the Tennessee River toward Corinth, Mississippi.
Confederate General P. G. T. Beauregard retreated to Corinth after the Battle of Shiloh, pursued by Union Major General Henry W. Halleck.

Winfield Scott

General Winfield ScottScottGen. Winfield Scott
During the Mexican–American War, Beauregard served as an engineer under General Winfield Scott.
Among those who joined the campaign were several officers who would later distinguish themselves in the American Civil War, including Major Joseph E. Johnston, Captain Robert E. Lee, and Lieutenants Ulysses S. Grant, George B. McClellan, George G. Meade, and P. G. T. Beauregard.

Second Battle of Fort Sumter

Fort Sumteramphibious landing to captureattack on Fort Sumter
Gen. Quincy A. Gillmore launched a series of attacks on Fort Wagner on Morris Island and other fortifications at the mouth of the harbor, while Rear Adm. John A. Dahlgren attempted to destroy Fort Sumter.
Confederate General P. G. T. Beauregard, who had commanded the defenses of Charleston and captured Fort Sumter in the first battle of the war, was in overall command of the defenders.

Flags of the Confederate States of America

Confederate flagConfederate battle flagStars and Bars
After Bull Run, Beauregard advocated the use of a standardized battle flag other than the "Stars and Bars" Confederate national flag to avoid visual confusion with the U.S. flag.
In a letter to Confederate Congressman C. J. Villeré, dated April 24, 1863, a design similar to Thompson's was proposed by General P. G. T. Beauregard, "whose earlier penchant for practicality had established the precedent for visual distinctiveness on the battlefield, proposed that 'a good design for the national flag would be the present battle-flag as Union Jack, and the rest all white or all blue'....The final version of the second national flag, adopted May 1, 1863, did just this: it set the St. Andrew's Cross of stars in the Union Jack with the rest of the civilian banner entirely white."

Confederate States Secretary of War

Secretary of WarConfederate Secretary of WarAssistant Secretary of War
He issued public statements challenging the ability of the Confederate Secretary of War to give commands to a full general.
Communicating often with P.G.T. Beauregard, he advocated for no direct clash with the Union.

Ulysses S. Grant

Ulysses GrantGrantPresident Grant
The two generals planned the concentration of Confederate forces to oppose the advance of Maj. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant before he could combine his army with that of Maj. Gen. Don Carlos Buell in a thrust up the Tennessee River toward Corinth, Mississippi.
On the morning of April 6, 1862, Grant's troops were taken by surprise when the Confederates, led by Generals Albert Sidney Johnston and P.G.T. Beauregard, struck first "like an Alpine avalanche" near Shiloh church, attacking five divisions of Grant's army and forcing a confused retreat toward the Tennessee River.

Braxton Bragg

BraggGeneral BraggGeneral Braxton Bragg
He hoped to be named commander of the state army, but was disappointed that the state legislature appointed Braxton Bragg.
After Johnston was killed in the battle, General P. G. T. Beauregard assumed command, and appointed Bragg his second in command.

François Marie, Chevalier de Reggio

Francesco M. de ReggioFrancesco Maria de ReggioFrançois Marie
Beauregard was the third child of Hélène Judith de Reggio, of mixed French and Italian ancestry and descendant of Francesco M. de Reggio, member of an Italian noble family whose family had migrated first to France and then to Louisiana, and her husband, Jacques Toutant-Beauregard, of French and Welsh ancestry.
Francois Marie, Chevalier de Reggio was the great-grandfather of Confederate General P.G.T. Beauregard, one of the most famous generals in the American Civil War.