Pacific Plate

PacificPacific tectonic platePacific crustPacific oceanic platePacific platesPacific tectonic platesPaleo-Pacific oceanic platetectonic
The Pacific Plate is an oceanic tectonic plate that lies beneath the Pacific Ocean.wikipedia
735 Related Articles

Plate tectonics

tectonic platesplate tectonictectonic
The Pacific Plate is an oceanic tectonic plate that lies beneath the Pacific Ocean.
As a result of this density stratification, oceanic crust generally lies below sea level (for example most of the Pacific Plate), while continental crust buoyantly projects above sea level (see the page isostasy for explanation of this principle).

Bird's Head Plate

Bird's Head
Hillis and Müller are reported to consider the Bird's Head Plate to be moving in unison with the Pacific Plate.
Hillis and Müller consider it to be moving in unison with the Pacific Plate.

Juan de Fuca Ridge

Juan De Fuca
The north-eastern side is a divergent boundary with the Explorer Plate, the Juan de Fuca Plate and the Gorda Plate forming respectively the Explorer Ridge, the Juan de Fuca Ridge and the Gorda Ridge.
The ridge separates the Pacific Plate to the west and the Juan de Fuca Plate to the east.

San Andreas Fault

San AndreasSan Andreas Fault ZoneSan Andreas Rift
In the middle of the eastern side is a transform boundary with the North American Plate along the San Andreas Fault, and a boundary with the Cocos Plate.
It forms the tectonic boundary between the Pacific Plate and the North American Plate, and its motion is right-lateral strike-slip (horizontal).

Hawaiian Islands

Sandwich IslandsHawaiiHawaiian
The Pacific Plate contains an interior hot spot forming the Hawaiian Islands.
This chain of islands, or archipelago, developed as the Pacific Plate slowly moved northwestward over a hotspot in the Earth's mantle at a rate of approximately 32 mi per million years.

North American Plate

North AmericanNorth American tectonic plateNorth America
In the middle of the eastern side is a transform boundary with the North American Plate along the San Andreas Fault, and a boundary with the Cocos Plate.
With an area of 76,000,000 km2, it is the Earth's second largest tectonic plate, behind the Pacific Plate (which borders the plate to the west).

Explorer Plate

Explorer
The north-eastern side is a divergent boundary with the Explorer Plate, the Juan de Fuca Plate and the Gorda Plate forming respectively the Explorer Ridge, the Juan de Fuca Ridge and the Gorda Ridge.
The southern boundary is a collection of transform faults, the Sovanco Fracture Zone, separating the Explorer Plate from the Pacific Plate.

East Pacific Rise

Inactive sulfides along the East Pacific Rise (spreading center)southern East Pacific Rise
The south-eastern side is a divergent boundary with the Nazca Plate forming the East Pacific Rise.
It separates the Pacific Plate to the west from (north to south) the North American Plate, the Rivera Plate, the Cocos Plate, the Nazca Plate, and the Antarctic Plate.

Juan de Fuca Plate

Juan de FucaJuan de Fuca tectonic plateJuan de Fuca oceanic plate
The north-eastern side is a divergent boundary with the Explorer Plate, the Juan de Fuca Plate and the Gorda Plate forming respectively the Explorer Ridge, the Juan de Fuca Ridge and the Gorda Ridge.
The Juan de Fuca Plate is bounded on the south by the Blanco Fracture Zone (running northwest off the coast of Oregon), on the north by the Nootka Fault (running southwest off Nootka Island, near Vancouver Island, British Columbia) and along the west by the Pacific Plate (which covers most of the Pacific Ocean and is the largest of Earth's tectonic plates).

Gorda Plate

GordaGorda tectonic plate
The north-eastern side is a divergent boundary with the Explorer Plate, the Juan de Fuca Plate and the Gorda Plate forming respectively the Explorer Ridge, the Juan de Fuca Ridge and the Gorda Ridge.
Stresses from the neighboring North American Plate and Pacific Plate cause frequent earthquakes in the interior of the plate, including the 1980 Eureka earthquake (also known as the Gorda Basin event).

Nazca Plate

NazcaNazca platesNazca tectonic plate
The south-eastern side is a divergent boundary with the Nazca Plate forming the East Pacific Rise.
The Nazca Plate is bounded on the west by the Pacific Plate and to the south by the Antarctic Plate through the East Pacific Rise and the Chile Rise respectively.

Cocos Plate

CocosCoco Ridge mountain chainCocos plates
In the middle of the eastern side is a transform boundary with the North American Plate along the San Andreas Fault, and a boundary with the Cocos Plate.
To the west it is bounded by the Pacific Plate and to the south by the Nazca Plate.

Pacific-Antarctic Ridge

Pacific–Antarctic RidgeIndian Antarctic Ridge
The southern side is a divergent boundary with the Antarctic Plate forming the Pacific-Antarctic Ridge.
The Pacific-Antarctic Ridge (PAR) is a divergent tectonic plate boundary located on the seafloor of the South Pacific Ocean, separating the Pacific Plate from the Antarctic Plate.

Japan Trench

Japanese Trench
The western side, the plate is bounded by the Okhotsk Plate at the Kuril-Kamchatka Trench and the Japan Trench, forms a convergent boundary by subducting under the Philippine Sea Plate creating the Mariana Trench, has a transform boundary with the Caroline Plate, and has a collision boundary with the North Bismarck Plate.
This trench is created as the oceanic Pacific plate subducts beneath the continental Okhotsk Plate (a microplate formerly a part of the North American Plate).

Explorer Ridge

Explorer spreading centerSouthern Explorer Ridge
The north-eastern side is a divergent boundary with the Explorer Plate, the Juan de Fuca Plate and the Gorda Plate forming respectively the Explorer Ridge, the Juan de Fuca Ridge and the Gorda Ridge.
The western side of the Explorer Ridge is associated with the northwest trending Pacific Plate which has formed the Queen Charlotte Fault, an active transform fault along the coast of British Columbia and southeast Alaska.

Gorda Ridge

The north-eastern side is a divergent boundary with the Explorer Plate, the Juan de Fuca Plate and the Gorda Plate forming respectively the Explorer Ridge, the Juan de Fuca Ridge and the Gorda Ridge.
To the west and south of the ridge is the Pacific Plate, which is currently moving west diverging from the Gorda Plate.

Antarctic Plate

AntarcticAntarcticaAntarctic Plates
The southern side is a divergent boundary with the Antarctic Plate forming the Pacific-Antarctic Ridge.
The adjoining plates are the Nazca Plate, the South American Plate, the African Plate, the Somali Plate, the Indo-Australian Plate, the Pacific Plate, and, across a transform boundary, the Scotia Plate.

Okhotsk Plate

Okhotsk
The western side, the plate is bounded by the Okhotsk Plate at the Kuril-Kamchatka Trench and the Japan Trench, forms a convergent boundary by subducting under the Philippine Sea Plate creating the Mariana Trench, has a transform boundary with the Caroline Plate, and has a collision boundary with the North Bismarck Plate.
On the east, the plate is bounded by the Pacific Plate at the Kuril-Kamchatka Trench and the Japan Trench, on the south by the Philippine Sea Plate at the Nankai Trough, on the west by the Eurasian Plate, and possibly on the southwest by the Amurian Plate.

Tonga Trench

TongaHorizon Deep
In the south-west, the Pacific Plate has a complex but generally convergent boundary with the Indo-Australian Plate, subducting under it north of New Zealand forming the Tonga Trench and the Kermadec Trench.
The fastest plate tectonic velocity on Earth occurs as the Pacific Plate is being subducted westward in the trench.

Alpine Fault

Alpine
The Alpine Fault marks a transform boundary between the two plates, and further south the Indo-Australian Plate subducts under the Pacific Plate forming the Puysegur Trench.
480 km) and forms the boundary between the Pacific Plate and the Indo-Australian Plate.

Mariana Trench

Marianas TrenchMarianadeepest known
The western side, the plate is bounded by the Okhotsk Plate at the Kuril-Kamchatka Trench and the Japan Trench, forms a convergent boundary by subducting under the Philippine Sea Plate creating the Mariana Trench, has a transform boundary with the Caroline Plate, and has a collision boundary with the North Bismarck Plate.
In this system, the western edge of one plate, the Pacific Plate, is subducted (i.e., thrust) beneath the smaller Mariana Plate that lies to the west.

Caroline Plate

Caroline
The western side, the plate is bounded by the Okhotsk Plate at the Kuril-Kamchatka Trench and the Japan Trench, forms a convergent boundary by subducting under the Philippine Sea Plate creating the Mariana Trench, has a transform boundary with the Caroline Plate, and has a collision boundary with the North Bismarck Plate.
A transform boundary forms the northern border with the Pacific Plate.

Philippine Sea Plate

Philippine PlatePhilippinePhilippines Sea Plate
The western side, the plate is bounded by the Okhotsk Plate at the Kuril-Kamchatka Trench and the Japan Trench, forms a convergent boundary by subducting under the Philippine Sea Plate creating the Mariana Trench, has a transform boundary with the Caroline Plate, and has a collision boundary with the North Bismarck Plate.
To the east, Philippine Sea Plate meets the Pacific Plate, subducting at the Izu-Ogasawara Trench.

North Bismarck Plate

northNorth Bismarck
The western side, the plate is bounded by the Okhotsk Plate at the Kuril-Kamchatka Trench and the Japan Trench, forms a convergent boundary by subducting under the Philippine Sea Plate creating the Mariana Trench, has a transform boundary with the Caroline Plate, and has a collision boundary with the North Bismarck Plate.
To the north it collides with the Pacific Plate and the Caroline Plate, part of the western part subducts under the Woodlark Plate of New Guinea, and it is separated from the South Bismarck Plate by a divergent boundary called Bismarck Seismic Sea Lineation (BSSL).

Puysegur Trench

The Alpine Fault marks a transform boundary between the two plates, and further south the Indo-Australian Plate subducts under the Pacific Plate forming the Puysegur Trench.
The 6300 m deep Puysegur Trench is a deep cleft in the floor of the south Tasman Sea formed by the subduction of the Indo-Australian Plate under the Pacific Plate to the south of New Zealand.