Pacific Scandal

corruption in railway contractsscandals
The Pacific Scandal was a political scandal in Canada involving bribes being accepted by 150 members of the Conservative government in the attempts of private interests to influence the bidding for a national rail contract.wikipedia
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Conservative Party of Canada (1867–1942)

ConservativeConservative PartyNational Government
The Pacific Scandal was a political scandal in Canada involving bribes being accepted by 150 members of the Conservative government in the attempts of private interests to influence the bidding for a national rail contract.
One major accomplishment of Macdonald's first government was the creation of the Canadian Pacific Railway which also led to the Pacific Scandal that brought down the government in 1873.

John A. Macdonald

Sir John A. MacdonaldJohn Alexander MacdonaldMacdonald
The scandal led to the resignation of Canada's first Prime Minister, Sir John A. Macdonald, and a transfer of power from his Conservative government to a Liberal government led by Alexander Mackenzie.
In 1873, he resigned from office over the Pacific Scandal, in which his party took bribes from businessmen seeking the contract to build the Canadian Pacific Railway.

Liberal Party of Canada

LiberalLiberal PartyLiberals
The scandal led to the resignation of Canada's first Prime Minister, Sir John A. Macdonald, and a transfer of power from his Conservative government to a Liberal government led by Alexander Mackenzie.
He was able to lead the party to power for the first time in 1873, after the MacDonald government lost a vote of no confidence in the House of Commons due to the Pacific Scandal.

Alexander Mackenzie (politician)

Alexander MackenzieMackenzieAlexander
The scandal led to the resignation of Canada's first Prime Minister, Sir John A. Macdonald, and a transfer of power from his Conservative government to a Liberal government led by Alexander Mackenzie.
He became leader of the party (thus Leader of the Opposition) in mid-1873, and a few months later succeeded John A. Macdonald as prime minister, following Macdonald's resignation in the aftermath of the Pacific Scandal.

Canadian Pacific Railway

Canadian PacificCPRCP Rail
An entirely different operation later built the Canadian Pacific Railway to the Pacific.
In 1873, Sir John A. Macdonald and other high-ranking politicians, bribed in the Pacific Scandal, granted federal contracts to Hugh Allan's Canada Pacific Railway Company (which was unrelated to the current company) rather than to David Lewis Macpherson's Inter-Ocean Railway Company which was thought to have connections to the American Northern Pacific Railway Company.

John Abbott

Sir John AbbottJohn Joseph Caldwell AbbottAbbott
Perhaps even more damaging to Macdonald was when the Liberals discovered a telegram, through a former employee of Allan, which was thought to have been stolen from the safe of Allan's lawyer, John Abbott.
A telegram leaked from his office played a key part in the Pacific Scandal of 1873, which led to the downfall of John A. Macdonald's first government.

Hugh Allan

Sir Hugh AllanAllan BrothersHugh
Nevertheless, the Montreal capitalist Hugh Allan, with his syndicate Canada Pacific Railway Company, sought the potentially lucrative charter for the project.
To ensure the contract, he bribed Prime Minister Sir John A. Macdonald, subscribing over $350,000 for Macdonald's re-election campaign in 1872, but the Pacific Scandal (and Macdonald's defeat) ended his dreams of supremacy in the railway business.

1874 Canadian federal election

18741874 federal election1874 election
Perhaps as a direct result of this scandal, the Conservative party fell in the eyes of the public and was relegated to being the Official Opposition in the federal election of 1874.
Macdonald's government had been forced to resign on November 5, 1873, because of allegations of corruption relating to the construction of the Canadian Pacific Railway (see the Pacific Scandal).

Lucius Seth Huntington

Lucius Huntington
On April 2, 1873, Lucius Seth Huntington, a Liberal Member of Parliament, created an uproar in the House of Commons.
In 1873, he exposed the Pacific Scandal which led to the fall of Sir John A. Macdonald's Conservatives.

1878 Canadian federal election

18781878 election1878 federal election
Macdonald would return as prime minister in the 1878 election thanks to his National Policy.
Sir John A. Macdonald and his Conservative/Liberal-Conservative party was returned to office after having been defeated five years before amidst scandals over the building of the Canadian Pacific Railway.

British Columbia

BCBritish Columbia, CanadaB.C.
As part of British Columbia's 1871 agreement to join the Canadian Confederation, the government had agreed to build a transcontinental railway linking the Pacific Province to the eastern provinces.

Canadian Confederation

ConfederationConfederation of CanadaFather of Confederation
As part of British Columbia's 1871 agreement to join the Canadian Confederation, the government had agreed to build a transcontinental railway linking the Pacific Province to the eastern provinces.

Pacific Ocean

PacificSouth PacificWestern Pacific
As part of British Columbia's 1871 agreement to join the Canadian Confederation, the government had agreed to build a transcontinental railway linking the Pacific Province to the eastern provinces.

Provinces and territories of Canada

ProvinceCanadian provinceprovincial
As part of British Columbia's 1871 agreement to join the Canadian Confederation, the government had agreed to build a transcontinental railway linking the Pacific Province to the eastern provinces.

Secret ballot

secretsecret voteAustralian Ballot
One of the new government's first measures was to introduce secret ballots in an effort to improve the integrity of future elections.

De facto

de facto relationshipde-factode facto'' segregation
Canada, a nascent country with a population of 3.5 million in 1871, lacked the means to exercise meaningful de facto control within the de jure political boundaries of the recently acquired Rupert's Land; building a transcontinental railway was national policy of high order to change this situation.

De jure

de iurede jure standardde-jure
Canada, a nascent country with a population of 3.5 million in 1871, lacked the means to exercise meaningful de facto control within the de jure political boundaries of the recently acquired Rupert's Land; building a transcontinental railway was national policy of high order to change this situation.

Rupert's Land

Rupert’s LandPrince Rupert's LandRuperts Land
Canada, a nascent country with a population of 3.5 million in 1871, lacked the means to exercise meaningful de facto control within the de jure political boundaries of the recently acquired Rupert's Land; building a transcontinental railway was national policy of high order to change this situation.

American Civil War

Civil WarU.S. Civil WarUnited States Civil War
Moreover, after the American Civil War the American frontier rapidly expanded west with land-hungry settlers, exacerbating talk of annexation.

Annexation

annexedannexannexing
Moreover, after the American Civil War the American frontier rapidly expanded west with land-hungry settlers, exacerbating talk of annexation.

Manifest destiny

Western expansionwestward expansionAmerican expansion
Indeed, sentiments of Manifest Destiny were abuzz in this time: in 1867, year of Confederation, US Secretary of State W. H. Seward surmised that the whole North American continent "shall be, sooner or later, within the magic circle of the American Union".

Confederation

confederacyconfederalconfederalism
Indeed, sentiments of Manifest Destiny were abuzz in this time: in 1867, year of Confederation, US Secretary of State W. H. Seward surmised that the whole North American continent "shall be, sooner or later, within the magic circle of the American Union".

United States Secretary of State

Secretary of StateU.S. Secretary of StateUS Secretary of State
Indeed, sentiments of Manifest Destiny were abuzz in this time: in 1867, year of Confederation, US Secretary of State W. H. Seward surmised that the whole North American continent "shall be, sooner or later, within the magic circle of the American Union".

Canadian Shield

Laurentian ShieldPrecambrian ShieldLaurentian Plateau
Thus the federal government favoured an "all Canadian route" through the rugged Canadian Shield of northern Ontario, refusing to consider a less costly route passing south through Wisconsin and Minnesota.

Ontario

Ontario, CanadaONProvince of Ontario
Thus the federal government favoured an "all Canadian route" through the rugged Canadian Shield of northern Ontario, refusing to consider a less costly route passing south through Wisconsin and Minnesota.