Paddy Chayefsky

Paddy ChayevskyChayefskyThe Passion of Josef D.
Sidney Aaron "Paddy" Chayefsky (January 29, 1923 – August 1, 1981) was an American playwright, screenwriter and novelist.wikipedia
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Network (1976 film)

NetworkNetwork (film)1976
As a screenwriter, he received three Academy Awards for Marty (1955), The Hospital (1971) and Network (1976).
Network is a 1976 American satirical film written by Paddy Chayefsky and directed by Sidney Lumet, about a fictional television network, UBS, and its struggle with poor ratings.

Marty (film)

MartyMarty'' (film)Marty,
As a screenwriter, he received three Academy Awards for Marty (1955), The Hospital (1971) and Network (1976).
The screenplay was written by Paddy Chayefsky, expanding upon his 1953 teleplay of the same name.

The Hospital

As a screenwriter, he received three Academy Awards for Marty (1955), The Hospital (1971) and Network (1976).
The Hospital was written by Paddy Chayefsky, who was awarded the 1972 Academy Award for Best Original Screenplay.

Golden Age of Television

Golden AgeTelevision's Golden AgeTV's Golden Age
He was considered one of the most renowned dramatists of the so-called Golden Age of Television.
Critics and viewers looked forward to new teleplays by Paddy Chayefsky, Horton Foote, Tad Mosel, Reginald Rose, Rod Serling, William Templeton, Gore Vidal and others.

Television Hall of Fame

Academy of Television Arts & Sciences Hall of FameAcademy of Television Arts and Sciences Hall of FameTelevision Academy Hall of Fame
Chayefsky was part of the inaugural class of inductees into the Academy of Television Arts & Sciences' Television Hall of Fame.
The first ceremony in 1984 celebrated the careers of Lucille Ball, Milton Berle, Paddy Chayefsky, Norman Lear, Edward R. Murrow, William S. Paley and David Sarnoff.

Slice of life

slice-of-lifeslice of life storyeveryday life
Martin Gottfried wrote in All His Jazz that Chayefsky "was a successful writer, the most successful graduate of television's slice of life school of naturalism."
During the 1950s, the phrase was commonly used in critical reviews of live television dramas, notably teleplays by JP Miller, Paddy Chayefsky, and Reginald Rose.

DeWitt Clinton High School

DeWitt ClintonDeWitt Clinton HS DeWitt Clinton High School in Manhattan
He attended DeWitt Clinton High School, where he served as an editor-in-chief of the school's literary magazine, "The Magpie" and wrote for the school newspaper.
Paddy Chayefsky (1923–1981), screenwriter (class of 1939)

Academy of Television Arts & Sciences

Television AcademyAcademy of Television Arts and SciencesTelevision Academy Honors
Chayefsky was part of the inaugural class of inductees into the Academy of Television Arts & Sciences' Television Hall of Fame.
Paddy Chayefsky

Robert Q. Lewis

Robert Q's MatineeRobert Q. Lewis ShowThe Robert Q. Lewis Show
During the late 1940s, he began working full-time on short stories and radio scripts, and during that period, he was a gagwriter for radio host Robert Q. Lewis.
Among those who served as writers on Lewis's radio programmes were playwright Neil Simon, author and dramatist Paddy Chayefsky, and radio comedy writer Goodman Ace.

Marty (teleplay)

Marty1953 teleplay of the same nameMarty Piletti
In 1953, Chayefsky wrote Marty, which was premiered on The Philco Television Playhouse, with Rod Steiger and Nancy Marchand.
"Marty" is a 1953 television play by Paddy Chayefsky.

The Philco Television Playhouse

The Philco-Goodyear Television PlayhousePhilco TV PlayhousePhilco Playhouse
In 1953, Chayefsky wrote Marty, which was premiered on The Philco Television Playhouse, with Rod Steiger and Nancy Marchand. Philco Television Playhouse producer Fred Coe saw the Danger and Manhunt episodes and enlisted Chayefsky to adapt the story It Happened on the Brooklyn Subway about a photographer on a New York City Subway train who reunites a concentration camp survivor with his long-lost wife. He submitted more work to Philco, including Printer's Measure, The Bachelor Party (1953) and The Big Deal (1953).
The series launched the television writing careers of Robert Alan Aurthur, Paddy Chayefsky, Sumner Locke Elliott, Horton Foote, Tad Mosel, William Templeton, Arnold Schulman, and Gore Vidal.

The Bronx

BronxBronx, New YorkThe Bronx, New York
Chayefsky's early stories were frequently influenced by the author's childhood in The Bronx.
Paddy Chayefsky's Academy Award-winning Marty was the most notable examination of working class Bronx life was also explored by Chayefsky in his 1956 film The Catered Affair, and in the 1993 Robert De Niro/Chazz Palminteri film, A Bronx Tale, Spike Lee's 1999 movie Summer of Sam, centered in an Italian-American Bronx community, 1994's I Like It Like That that takes place in the predominantly Puerto Rican neighborhood of the South Bronx, and Doughboys, the story of two Italian-American brothers in danger of losing their bakery thanks to one brother's gambling debts.

Middle of the Night

filmfirst Chayefsky theater work
The seventh season of Philco Television Playhouse began September 19, 1954 with E. G. Marshall and Eva Marie Saint in Chayefsky's Middle of the Night, a play which relocated to Broadway theaters 15 months later; In 1956, Middle of the Night opened on Broadway with Edward G. Robinson and Gena Rowlands, and its success led to a national tour.
The screenplay was adapted by Paddy Chayefsky from his Broadway play of the same name.

Rod Steiger

Rodney Steven Steiger
In 1953, Chayefsky wrote Marty, which was premiered on The Philco Television Playhouse, with Rod Steiger and Nancy Marchand.
On May 24, 1953, Steiger played the title role in Paddy Chayefsky's "Marty" episode of the Goodyear Television Playhouse.

Gideon (play)

GideonGideon'' (play)
Guthrie received another nomination for Chayefsky's Gideon, as did actor Fredric March.
Gideon, a play by Paddy Chayefsky, is a seriocomic treatment of the story of Gideon, a judge in the Old Testament.

The 20th Century Fox Hour

Hour of Stars
Chayefsky's The Great American Hoax was broadcast May 15, 1957 during the second season of The 20th Century Fox Hour.
Following his Philco Television Playhouse years, Paddy Chayefsky's The Great American Hoax, starring Ed Wynn, was seen May 15, 1957 during the second season.

Fred Coe

Philco Television Playhouse producer Fred Coe saw the Danger and Manhunt episodes and enlisted Chayefsky to adapt the story It Happened on the Brooklyn Subway about a photographer on a New York City Subway train who reunites a concentration camp survivor with his long-lost wife.
Coe was known as a patron saint of writers, discovering or advancing the careers of Paddy Chayefsky, Horton Foote, Tad Mosel, JP Miller, David Swift, N. Richard Nash, A.E. Hotchner, Herb Gardner, David Shaw, and many others.

Eva Marie Saint

Eva M. Saint
The seventh season of Philco Television Playhouse began September 19, 1954 with E. G. Marshall and Eva Marie Saint in Chayefsky's Middle of the Night, a play which relocated to Broadway theaters 15 months later; In 1956, Middle of the Night opened on Broadway with Edward G. Robinson and Gena Rowlands, and its success led to a national tour.
In 1955, Saint was nominated for her first Emmy for "Best Actress In A Single Performance" on The Philco Television Playhouse, for playing the young mistress of middle-aged E. G. Marshall in Middle of the Night by Paddy Chayefsky.

Joshua Logan

Josh Logan
During the London production of this musical, Chayefsky encountered Joshua Logan, a future collaborator, and Garson Kanin, who invited Chayefsky to collaborate with him on a documentary of the Allied invasion, The True Glory.
Logan returned to Broadway, directing Middle of the Night by Paddy Chayefsky which ran 477 performances.

Altered States

1980 film
He wrote the screenplay for the 1980 film, but he is credited by his real first and middle name, Sidney Aaron, because of disputes with director Ken Russell.
Altered States is a 1980 American science-fiction horror film directed by Ken Russell based on the novel of the same name by playwright and screenwriter Paddy Chayefsky.

Printer's Measure

He submitted more work to Philco, including Printer's Measure, The Bachelor Party (1953) and The Big Deal (1953).
"Printer's Measure" is an episode of the TV anthology series The Philco-Goodyear Television Playhouse written by Paddy Chayefsky.

The Catered Affair

The Catered Affair (1956)
It was directed by Richard Brooks and produced by Sam Zimbalist from a screenplay by Gore Vidal, based on a television play by Paddy Chayefsky.

The Americanization of Emily

The Americanization of Emily (1964)
The Americanization of Emily is a 1964 American black-and-white romantic dark comedy-drama war film written by Paddy Chayefsky, produced by Martin Ransohoff, directed by Arthur Hiller, and starring James Garner, Julie Andrews, Melvyn Douglas, and James Coburn.

Academy Award for Best Adapted Screenplay

Best Adapted ScreenplayBest Writing, Screenplay Based on Material from Another MediumBest Writing, Screenplay
Billy Wilder, Charles Brackett, Paddy Chayefsky, Francis Ford Coppola, Horton Foote, William Goldman, Robert Benton, Bo Goldman, and the Coen brothers have won Oscars for both original and adapted screenplays.

The Passion of Josef D.

The Passion of Josef D
The Passion of Josef D. (1964)
The Passion of Josef D is a play by Paddy Chayefsky based on the life of Josef Stalin.