Palace of Westminster

Houses of ParliamentWestminster HallWestminsterParliamentWestminster PalaceHouse of LordsHouse of CommonsRoyal GalleryBritish Houses of ParliamentThe Palace of Westminster
The Palace of Westminster serves as the meeting place of the House of Commons and the House of Lords, the two houses of the Parliament of the United Kingdom.wikipedia
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House of Lords

LordsBritish House of LordsThe House of Lords
The Palace of Westminster serves as the meeting place of the House of Commons and the House of Lords, the two houses of the Parliament of the United Kingdom.
Like the House of Commons, it meets in the Palace of Westminster.

House of Commons of the United Kingdom

House of CommonsBritish House of CommonsCommons
The Palace of Westminster serves as the meeting place of the House of Commons and the House of Lords, the two houses of the Parliament of the United Kingdom.
Like the upper house, the House of Lords, it meets in the Palace of Westminster.

Westminster Abbey

WestminsterAbbey of WestminsterAbbot of Westminster
Its name, which derives from the neighbouring Westminster Abbey, may refer to either of two structures: the Old Palace, a medieval building-complex destroyed by fire in 1834, or its replacement, the New Palace that stands today.
Westminster Abbey, formally titled the Collegiate Church of Saint Peter at Westminster, is a large, mainly Gothic abbey church in the City of Westminster, London, England, just to the west of the Palace of Westminster.

Burning of Parliament

fire1834 Houses of Parliament firea fire
Its name, which derives from the neighbouring Westminster Abbey, may refer to either of two structures: the Old Palace, a medieval building-complex destroyed by fire in 1834, or its replacement, the New Palace that stands today.
The Palace of Westminster, the medieval royal palace used as the home of the British parliament, was largely destroyed by fire on 16 October 1834.

Parliament of the United Kingdom

ParliamentUK ParliamentBritish Parliament
The Palace of Westminster serves as the meeting place of the House of Commons and the House of Lords, the two houses of the Parliament of the United Kingdom.
The two houses meet in the Palace of Westminster in the City of Westminster, one of the inner boroughs of the capital city, London.

City of Westminster

WestminsterLondon Borough of WestminsterWestminster, London
Commonly known as the Houses of Parliament after its occupants, the Palace lies on the north bank of the River Thames in the City of Westminster, in central London, England.
Many sites commonly associated with London are in the borough, including St James's Palace, Buckingham Palace, the Palace of Westminster (Houses of Parliament) and 10 Downing Street.

Jewel Tower

King's Privy Wardrobe
In 1834 an even greater fire ravaged the heavily rebuilt Houses of Parliament, and the only significant medieval structures to survive were Westminster Hall, the Cloisters of St Stephen's, the Chapel of St Mary Undercroft, and the Jewel Tower.
The Jewel Tower is a 14th-century surviving element of the Palace of Westminster, in London, England.

Augustus Pugin

PuginA. W. N. PuginAugustus Welby Northmore Pugin
Augustus Pugin, a leading authority on Gothic architecture and style, assisted Barry and designed the interior of the Palace.
His work culminated in designing the interior of the Palace of Westminster in Westminster, London, England, and its iconic clock tower, later renamed the Elizabeth Tower, which houses the bell known as Big Ben.

Westminster system

WestminsterWestminster-styleWestminster parliamentary system
The Palace is one of the centres of political life in the United Kingdom; "Westminster" has become a metonym for the UK Parliament and the British Government, and the Westminster system of government commemorates the name of the palace.
This term comes from the Palace of Westminster, the seat of the British Parliament.

Big Ben

Elizabeth TowerClock Towerclock tower of the Palace of Westminster
The Elizabeth Tower, in particular, often referred to by the name of its main bell, Big Ben, has become an iconic landmark of London and of the United Kingdom in general, one of the most popular tourist attractions in the city, and an emblem of parliamentary democracy.
Big Ben is the nickname for the Great Bell of the striking clock at the north end of the Palace of Westminster in London and is usually extended to refer to both the clock and the clock tower.

St Mary Undercroft

Chapel of St Mary UndercroftCrypt Chapel of St Mary UndercroftSecret Chapel of the Commons
In 1834 an even greater fire ravaged the heavily rebuilt Houses of Parliament, and the only significant medieval structures to survive were Westminster Hall, the Cloisters of St Stephen's, the Chapel of St Mary Undercroft, and the Jewel Tower.
The Chapel of St Mary Undercroft is a Church of England chapel in the Palace of Westminster, London, England.

Speaker of the House of Commons (United Kingdom)

Speaker of the House of CommonsSpeakerSpeaker of the British House of Commons
Committees appointed by both houses manage the building and report to the Speaker of the House of Commons and to the Lord Speaker.
The Speaker has the right and obligation to reside in Speaker's House at the Palace of Westminster.

Painted Chamber

Important state ceremonies were held in the Painted Chamber which had been originally built in the 13th century as the main bedchamber for King Henry III.
The Painted Chamber was part of the medieval Palace of Westminster.

St Stephen's Chapel

St. Stephen's, WestminsterSt Stephen's, WestminsterSt Stephen's Hall
The Commons acquired a permanent home at the Palace in St Stephen's Chapel, the former chapel of the royal palace, during the reign of Edward VI.
St Stephen's Chapel, sometimes called the Royal Chapel of St Stephen, was a chapel in the old Palace of Westminster which served as the chamber of the House of Commons of England and that of Great Britain from 1547 to 1834.

White Chamber

White Hall
In 1801 the Upper House moved into the larger White Chamber (also known as the Lesser Hall), which had housed the Court of Requests; the expansion of the Peerage by King George III during the 18th century, along with the imminent Act of Union with Ireland, necessitated the move, as the original chamber could not accommodate the increased number of peers.
The White Chamber was part of the medieval Palace of Westminster.

England

๐Ÿด๓ ง๓ ข๓ ฅ๓ ฎ๓ ง๓ ฟ๓ ง๓ ข๓ ฅ๓ ฎ๓ ง๓ ฟEnglishENG
Commonly known as the Houses of Parliament after its occupants, the Palace lies on the north bank of the River Thames in the City of Westminster, in central London, England.
In the House of Commons which is the lower house of the British Parliament based at the Palace of Westminster, there are 532 Members of Parliament (MPs) for constituencies in England, out of the 650 total.

River Thames

ThamesThames Riverthe Thames
Commonly known as the Houses of Parliament after its occupants, the Palace lies on the north bank of the River Thames in the City of Westminster, in central London, England.
In central London, the river passes Pimlico and Vauxhall, and then forms one of the principal axes of the city, from the Palace of Westminster to the Tower of London.

List of English monarchs

King of EnglandEnglish CrownMonarch
The first royal palace constructed on the site dated from the 11th century, and Westminster became the primary residence of the Kings of England until fire destroyed much of the complex in 1512.

Politics of the United Kingdom

British politicsBritish politicianBritish Government
The Palace is one of the centres of political life in the United Kingdom; "Westminster" has become a metonym for the UK Parliament and the British Government, and the Westminster system of government commemorates the name of the palace.
The Scottish Government is responsible for all issues that are not explicitly reserved to the United Kingdom Parliament at Westminster, by the Scotland Act; including NHS Scotland, education, justice, rural affairs, and transport.

Gothic Revival architecture

Gothic RevivalNeo-GothicGothic
In the subsequent competition for the reconstruction of the Palace, the architect Charles Barry won with a design for new buildings in the Gothic Revival style, specifically inspired by the English Perpendicular Gothic style of the 14thโ€“16th centuries.
Gothic Revival also took on political connotations; with the "rational" and "radical" Neoclassical style being seen as associated with republicanism and liberalism (as evidenced by its use in the United States and to a lesser extent in Republican France), the more spiritual and traditional Gothic Revival became associated with monarchism and conservatism, which was reflected by the choice of styles for the rebuilt government centres of the Palace of Westminster (holding the Parliament of the United Kingdom) in London and Parliament Hill in Ottawa.

Court of King's Bench (England)

Court of King's BenchKing's BenchCourt of the King's Bench
Soane's work at the palace also included new library facilities for both Houses of Parliament and new law courts for the Chancery and King's Bench.
The King's Bench finally joined the Court of Common Pleas and Exchequer of Pleas in Westminster Hall in 1318 and making its last travels in 1421.

Thorney Island (London)

Thorney IslandThorn Ey (Thorn Island)Thorney (or Thorney Island)
Known in medieval times as Thorney Island, the site may have been first-used for a royal residence by Canute the Great during his reign from 1016 to 1035.
Thorney Island was the eyot (or small island) on the Thames, upstream of medieval London, where Westminster Abbey and the Palace of Westminster (commonly known today as the Houses of Parliament) were built.

Henry VIII of England

Henry VIIIKing Henry VIIIKing Henry VIII of England
In 1512, during the early years of the reign of King Henry VIII, fire destroyed the royal residential ("privy") area of the palace.
Following the ceremony, there was a grand banquet in Westminster Hall.

Palace of Whitehall

Whitehall PalaceWhitehallYork Place
In 1534, Henry VIII acquired York Place from Cardinal Thomas Wolsey, a powerful minister who had lost the King's favour.
By the 13th century, the Palace of Westminster had become the centre of government in England, and had been the main London residence of the king since 1049.

Parliament of England

ParliamentEnglish Parliamentmember of Parliament
After that, it served as the home of the Parliament of England, which had met there since the 13th century, and also as the seat of the Royal Courts of Justice, based in and around Westminster Hall.
This Upper Chamber became known as the House of Lords from 1544 onward, and the Lower Chamber became known as the House of Commons, collectively known as the Houses of Parliament.