Paleocene

PalaeoceneLate PaleocenePaleocene epochMiddle to Late PaleoceneEarly PaleoceneMiddle PaleoceneEarly PaleogenePalaeocene EpochUpper PaleoceneDanian
The Paleocene, or Palaeocene, is a geological epoch that lasted from about 66 to 56 million years ago (mya).wikipedia
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Paleocene–Eocene Thermal Maximum

Paleocene-Eocene Thermal MaximumPETMPaleocene-Eocene transition
The end of the epoch was marked by the Paleocene–Eocene thermal maximum (PETM), which was a major climatic event wherein about 2,500–4,500 gigatons of carbon were released into the atmosphere and ocean systems, causing a spike in global temperatures and ocean acidification.
This climate event occurred at the time boundary of the Paleocene and Eocene geological epochs.

Eocene

Late EoceneMiddle EoceneEocene Epoch
The name is a combination of the Ancient Greek palæo- meaning "old" and the Eocene Epoch (which succeeds the Paleocene), translating to "the old part of the Eocene". By this time, Italian geologist Giovanni Arduino had divided the history of life on Earth into the Primary (Paleozoic), Secondary (Mesozoic), and Tertiary in 1759; French geologist Jules Desnoyers had proposed splitting off the Quaternary from the Tertiary in 1829; and Scottish geologist Charles Lyell (ignoring the Quaternary) had divided the Tertiary epoch into the Eocene, Miocene, Pliocene, and New Pliocene (Holocene) periods in 1833.
The Eocene spans the time from the end of the Paleocene Epoch to the beginning of the Oligocene Epoch.

Danian

Early PaleoceneEarlyMontian
It is divided into three ages: the Danian spanning 66 to 61.6 million years ago (mya), the Selandian spanning 61.6 to 59.2 mya, and the Thanetian spanning 59.2 to 56 mya.
The Danian is the oldest age or lowest stage of the Paleocene epoch or series, the Paleogene period or system and the Cenozoic era or erathem.

Selandian

Middle PaleoceneMiddleS
It is divided into three ages: the Danian spanning 66 to 61.6 million years ago (mya), the Selandian spanning 61.6 to 59.2 mya, and the Thanetian spanning 59.2 to 56 mya.
The Selandian is in the geologic timescale an age or stage in the Paleocene.

Cenozoic

Cenozoic EraCainozoicAge of Mammals
It is the first epoch of the Paleogene Period in the modern Cenozoic Era.
The Cenozoic is divided into three periods: the Paleogene, Neogene, and Quaternary; and seven epochs: the Paleocene, Eocene, Oligocene, Miocene, Pliocene, Pleistocene, and Holocene.

Thanetian

Late PaleoceneLandenianMP 6
It is divided into three ages: the Danian spanning 66 to 61.6 million years ago (mya), the Selandian spanning 61.6 to 59.2 mya, and the Thanetian spanning 59.2 to 56 mya.
The Thanetian is, in the ICS Geologic timescale, the latest age or uppermost stratigraphic stage of the Paleocene Epoch or series.

Paleogene

PalaeogenePaleogene PeriodLower Tertiary
It is the first epoch of the Paleogene Period in the modern Cenozoic Era.
This period consists of the Paleocene, Eocene, and Oligocene epochs.

Ypresian

Early EoceneLower EoceneEarly
The Selandian and Thanetian are both defined in Itzurun beach by the Basque town of Zumaia, 43.3006°N, -2.2594°W, as the area is a continuous early Santonian to early Eocene sea cliff outcrop.
It spans the time between, is preceded by the Thanetian age (part of the Paleocene) and is followed by the Eocene Lutetian age.

Epoch (geology)

epochepochsgeological epoch
The Paleocene, or Palaeocene, is a geological epoch that lasted from about 66 to 56 million years ago (mya).

Mammal

mammalsMammaliamammalian
Mammals proliferated in the Paleocene, and the earliest placentals and marsupials are recorded from this time, but most Paleocene taxa have ambiguous affinities.
The earliest undisputed fossils of placentals comes from the early Paleocene, after the extinction of the dinosaurs.

Cretaceous–Paleogene extinction event

extinction of the dinosaursCretaceous-Paleogene extinction eventK-Pg extinction event
The K-Pg extinction event, brought on by an asteroid impact and volcanism, marked the beginning of the Paleocene and killed off 75% of living species, most famously the non-avian dinosaurs.
There is no evidence of mass extinction of these organisms, and there is support for high productivity of these species in southern high latitudes as a result of cooling temperatures in the early Paleocene.

Wilcox Group

Mat Wilcox
Several economically important coal deposits formed during the Paleocene, such as the sub-bituminous Fort Union Formation in the Powder River Basin of Wyoming and Montana, which produces 43% of American coal; the Wilcox Group in Texas, the richest deposits of the Gulf Coastal Plain; and the Cerrejón mine in Colombia, the largest open-pit mine in the world.
The group ranges in age from Paleocene to Eocene and is in Texas subdivided into the Calvert Bluff, Simsboro and Hooper Formations, and in Alabama into the Nanafalia and Hatchetigbee Formations.

Fur Formation

FurMoler Formation
The Selandian deposits in this area are directly overlain by the Eocene Fur Formation–the Thanetian was not represented here–and this discontinuity in the deposition record is why the GSSP was moved to Zumaia.
The Fur Formation was deposited just above the Palaeocene-Eocene boundary, about 55 million years ago, and its tropical or sub-tropical flora indicate that the climate after the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum was moderately warm (approximately 4-8 degrees warmer than today).

Powder River Basin

Powder RiverareaOrin
Several economically important coal deposits formed during the Paleocene, such as the sub-bituminous Fort Union Formation in the Powder River Basin of Wyoming and Montana, which produces 43% of American coal; the Wilcox Group in Texas, the richest deposits of the Gulf Coastal Plain; and the Cerrejón mine in Colombia, the largest open-pit mine in the world.
The majority of the coal mined in the Powder River Basin is part of the Fort Union Formation (Paleocene), with the low sulfur and ash content of the coal in the region making it very desirable.

Thanet Formation

Thanet SandsThanetThanet Beds
The Thanetian was first proposed by Swiss geologist Eugène Renevier, in 1873; he included the south England Thanet, Woolwich, and Reading formations.
It is of early to mid-Thanetian (late Paleocene) age and gave its name to that stratigraphic interval.

Fort Union Formation

Fort UnionFort Union Group
Several economically important coal deposits formed during the Paleocene, such as the sub-bituminous Fort Union Formation in the Powder River Basin of Wyoming and Montana, which produces 43% of American coal; the Wilcox Group in Texas, the richest deposits of the Gulf Coastal Plain; and the Cerrejón mine in Colombia, the largest open-pit mine in the world.
The Fort Union is mostly of Paleocene age and represents a time of extensive swamps as well as fluvial and lacustrine conditions.

Maastrichtian

Late MaastrichtianEarly MaastrichtianMaestrichtian
Since the mid-Maastrichtian, more and more carbon had been sequestered in the deep sea possibly due to a global cooling trend and increased circulation into the deep sea.
The Maastrichtian was preceded by the Campanian and succeeded by the Danian (part of the Paleogene and Paleocene).

Cerrejón Formation

Cerrejón
Conversely, low plant diversity and a lack of specialization in insects in the Colombian Cerrejón Formation, dated to 58 mya, indicates the ecosystem was still recovering from the extinction event 7 million years later.
The Cerrejón Formation is a geologic formation in Colombia dating back to the Middle-Late Paleocene.

Wilhelm Philippe Schimper

Schimp.SchimperWilhelm Philipp Schimper
The word "Paleocene" was first used by French/German paleobotanist and geologist Wilhelm Philipp Schimper in 1874 while describing deposits near Paris (spelled "Paléocène" in his treatise).
He called the new epoch the "Paleocene Era", of which he based on paleobotanical findings from the Paris Basin.

Reading Formation

Reading BedsReading
The Thanetian was first proposed by Swiss geologist Eugène Renevier, in 1873; he included the south England Thanet, Woolwich, and Reading formations.

Tertiary

Tertiary periodTertiary eraTertiary age
By this time, Italian geologist Giovanni Arduino had divided the history of life on Earth into the Primary (Paleozoic), Secondary (Mesozoic), and Tertiary in 1759; French geologist Jules Desnoyers had proposed splitting off the Quaternary from the Tertiary in 1829; and Scottish geologist Charles Lyell (ignoring the Quaternary) had divided the Tertiary epoch into the Eocene, Miocene, Pliocene, and New Pliocene (Holocene) periods in 1833.
The span of the Tertiary is subdivided into the Paleocene Epoch (56–66 million years BP), the Eocene Epoch (33.9–56 million years BP), the Oligocene Epoch (23–33.9 million years BP), the Miocene Epoch (5.3–23 million years BP) and the Pliocene Epoch (2.6–5.3 million years BP), extending to the first stage of the Pleistocene Epoch, the Gelasian stage.

Western Interior Seaway

Cretaceous SeawayCretaceous Interior SeawayWestern Interior Sea
Because of this and a drop in sea levels resulting from tectonic activity, the Western Interior Seaway, which had divided the continent of North America for much of the Cretaceous, had receded.
During the early Paleocene, parts of the Western Interior Seaway (marine waters) still occupied areas of the Mississippi Embayment, submerging the site of present-day Memphis.

Multituberculata

multituberculatemultituberculatesmultituberculate mammal
Multituberculates, a now-extinct rodent-like group not closely related to any modern mammal, were the most successful group of mammals in the Mesozoic, and they reached peak diversity in the early Paleocene.
They eventually declined from the late Palaeocene onwards, disappearing in the late Eocene, though they might have lived even longer into the Miocene, if gondwanatheres are part of this group.

Vista Alegre crater

Vista Alegre
Craters were also formed near the K-Pg boundary, the largest the Mexican Chicxulub crater whose impact was a major precipitator of the extinction event, and also the Ukrainian Boltysh crater, the Canadian Eagle Butte crater (though it may be younger), the Vista Alegre crater (though this may date to about 115 mya ), and the contested Indian Shiva crater.
It is 9.5 km in diameter and the age is estimated to be less than 65 million years (Paleocene or younger).

Chicxulub crater

Chicxulub impactChicxulubChicxulub impact crater
Craters were also formed near the K-Pg boundary, the largest the Mexican Chicxulub crater whose impact was a major precipitator of the extinction event, and also the Ukrainian Boltysh crater, the Canadian Eagle Butte crater (though it may be younger), the Vista Alegre crater (though this may date to about 115 mya ), and the contested Indian Shiva crater. It is generally thought that a wide asteroid impact, forming the Chicxulub Crater in the Yucatán Peninsula in the Gulf of Mexico, and Deccan Trap volcanism caused a cataclysmic event at the boundary resulting in the extinction of 75% of all species.
The rocks above the impact feature are layers of marl and limestone reaching to a depth of almost 1000 m. These rocks date back as far as the Paleocene.