Paleosiberian languages

PaleosiberianPaleo-SiberianPaleo-Siberian languagesHyperboreanPalaeo-SiberianPaleoasian languagePaleoasiaticPaleosiberian languagePaleosiberians
Paleosiberian (or Paleo-Siberian) languages or Paleoasian (Paleo-Asiatic) (from Greek παλαιός palaios, "ancient") are terms of convenience used in linguistics to classify a disparate group of linguistic isolates as well as a few small families of languages spoken in parts both of northeastern Siberia and of the Russian Far East.wikipedia
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Siberia

SiberianEastern SiberiaEast Siberia
Paleosiberian (or Paleo-Siberian) languages or Paleoasian (Paleo-Asiatic) (from Greek παλαιός palaios, "ancient") are terms of convenience used in linguistics to classify a disparate group of linguistic isolates as well as a few small families of languages spoken in parts both of northeastern Siberia and of the Russian Far East.
Another account sees the name as the ancient tribal ethnonym of the (also "Syopyr" (sʲɵpᵻr)), an ethnic group which spoke a Paleosiberian language.

Nivkh languages

NivkhNivkh languageGilyak
Michael Fortescue (2011) suggests that Chukotko-Kamchatkan and Nivkh (Gilyak) are related to each other on the basis of morphological, typological, and lexical evidence.
For convenience, it may be included in the geographical group of Paleosiberian languages.

Chukotko-Kamchatkan languages

Chukotko-KamchatkanChukotko-Kamchatkan peoplesChukchi-Kamchatkan
While the family is sometimes grouped typologically and geographically as Paleo-Siberian, no external genetic relationship has been widely accepted as proven.

Koreanic languages

KoreanicKoreanKoreanic-speakers
Koreanic (Korean) shares some typological features with the four Paleosiberian groups (e.g. lack of phonemic voiced stops, verb compounding, earlier ergativity), and Alexander Vovin suggests that it actually has more in common with "Paleosiberian" than with the putative Altaic group (to which it is sometimes assigned) — even though the Paleosiberian languages are not thought to form a typological whole.
Alexander Vovin (2015) notes that Koreanic shares some typological features with the four Paleosiberian language families (e.g. lack of phonemic voiced stops, verb compounding, earlier ergativity), and suggests that it actually has more in common with "Paleosiberian" (which is a geographical and areal grouping rather than a genetic one) than with the putative Altaic group.

Korean language

KoreanKorean-languageKorea
Koreanic (Korean) shares some typological features with the four Paleosiberian groups (e.g. lack of phonemic voiced stops, verb compounding, earlier ergativity), and Alexander Vovin suggests that it actually has more in common with "Paleosiberian" than with the putative Altaic group (to which it is sometimes assigned) — even though the Paleosiberian languages are not thought to form a typological whole.
Alexander Vovin (2015) notes that Koreanic shares some typological features with the four Paleosiberian language families (e.g. lack of phonemic voiced stops, verb compounding, earlier ergativity), and suggests that it actually has more in common with the various Paleosiberian language family (which is a geographical and areal grouping rather a genetic one) than with the putative Altaic group.

Yukaghir languages

YukaghirYukaghir languageYukagir
Fortescue does not consider Yukaghir and Yeniseian to be genetically related to Chukotko-Kamchatkan-Amuric.

Dené–Yeniseian languages

Dené–YeniseianDene–YeniseianDene-Yeniseian
Dené–Yeniseian has been called "the first demonstration of a genealogical link between Old World and New World language families that meets the standards of traditional comparative-historical linguistics".
These people would have been hunter-gatherers, as are the modern Yeniseians, but unlike nearly all other Siberian groups (except for some Paleosiberian peoples located around the Pacific Rim of far eastern Siberia, who appear genetically unrelated to the Yeniseians).

Eurasiatic languages

EurasiaticEurasiatic language familyinterior Eurasian language families

Ainu language

AinuAinu languagesSakhalin Ainu
Ainu is sometimes considered to be a Paleosiberian language, although it is not, strictly speaking, a language of Siberia.
Ainu is sometimes grouped with the Paleosiberian languages, but this is only a geographic blanket term for several unrelated language families that were present in Siberia before the advances of Turkic and Tungusic languages there.

Linguistics

linguistlinguisticlinguists
Paleosiberian (or Paleo-Siberian) languages or Paleoasian (Paleo-Asiatic) (from Greek παλαιός palaios, "ancient") are terms of convenience used in linguistics to classify a disparate group of linguistic isolates as well as a few small families of languages spoken in parts both of northeastern Siberia and of the Russian Far East.

Language isolate

isolateisolateslanguage isolates
Paleosiberian (or Paleo-Siberian) languages or Paleoasian (Paleo-Asiatic) (from Greek παλαιός palaios, "ancient") are terms of convenience used in linguistics to classify a disparate group of linguistic isolates as well as a few small families of languages spoken in parts both of northeastern Siberia and of the Russian Far East.

Russian Far East

Soviet Far EastFar EastFar East Russia
Paleosiberian (or Paleo-Siberian) languages or Paleoasian (Paleo-Asiatic) (from Greek παλαιός palaios, "ancient") are terms of convenience used in linguistics to classify a disparate group of linguistic isolates as well as a few small families of languages spoken in parts both of northeastern Siberia and of the Russian Far East.

Tungusic languages

TungusicTungusic languageTungus
They are not known to have any linguistic relationship to each other; their only common link is that they are held to have antedated the more dominant languages, particularly Tungusic and latterly Turkic languages, that have largely displaced them.

Turkic languages

TurkicTurkic languageTurkic-speaking
They are not known to have any linguistic relationship to each other; their only common link is that they are held to have antedated the more dominant languages, particularly Tungusic and latterly Turkic languages, that have largely displaced them.

Russian language

RussianRussian-languageRussian:
Even more recently, Turkic (at least in Siberia) and especially Tungusic have been displaced in their turn by Russian.

Language family

language familiesfamilyLanguage families and languages
Paleosiberian (or Paleo-Siberian) languages or Paleoasian (Paleo-Asiatic) (from Greek παλαιός palaios, "ancient") are terms of convenience used in linguistics to classify a disparate group of linguistic isolates as well as a few small families of languages spoken in parts both of northeastern Siberia and of the Russian Far East.

Michael Fortescue

Fortescue, Michael
Michael Fortescue (2011) suggests that Chukotko-Kamchatkan and Nivkh (Gilyak) are related to each other on the basis of morphological, typological, and lexical evidence.

Yeniseian languages

YeniseianYeniseian languageYeniseian language family
Fortescue does not consider Yukaghir and Yeniseian to be genetically related to Chukotko-Kamchatkan-Amuric.