Palo Duro Canyon

Palo Duro Canyon Geologic map
The Lighthouse
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Georgia O'Keeffe, Red Landscape, oil on board, 1916–1917, Panhandle–Plains Historical Museum, West Texas A&M University

Canyon system of the Caprock Escarpment located in the Texas Panhandle near the cities of Amarillo and Canyon.

- Palo Duro Canyon
Palo Duro Canyon Geologic map

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Palo Duro Canyon

Adam Paine

Black Seminole who served as a United States Army Indian Scout and received America's highest military decoration—the Medal of Honor—for his actions in the Indian Wars of the western United States.

Black Seminole who served as a United States Army Indian Scout and received America's highest military decoration—the Medal of Honor—for his actions in the Indian Wars of the western United States.

Palo Duro Canyon

From September 26, to September 27, 1874, near Palo Duro Canyon, a tributary of the Red River, Payne participated in the Battle of Palo Duro Canyon.

Palo Duro Canyon, Texas

Herbert Maier

American architect and public administrator, most notable as an architect for his work at Yosemite, Grand Canyon and Yellowstone National Parks.

American architect and public administrator, most notable as an architect for his work at Yosemite, Grand Canyon and Yellowstone National Parks.

Palo Duro Canyon, Texas
Fishing Bridge Museum at Yellowstone.
The NPS arrowhead symbol, 1952

Lodge, Palo Duro Canyon State Park, Texas

A map showing the Comanche lands (Comancheria) during the 1800s.

Texas–Indian wars

The Texas–Indian wars were a series conflicts between settlers in Texas and the Southern Plains Indians during the 19th-century.

The Texas–Indian wars were a series conflicts between settlers in Texas and the Southern Plains Indians during the 19th-century.

A map showing the Comanche lands (Comancheria) during the 1800s.
A map showing Texas and areas in the Americas claimed or permanently settled by Europeans in the mid-1700s.
A map showing the range of the Plains Indians near the time of European contact
Tonkawa lands
Comanche territory c.1850
New Spain in 1819
Stephen F. Austin, known as the "Father of Texas"
Comanche braves, c. 1867–1874.
Comanches of West Texas in war regalia, c. 1830.
Capt. John "Rip" Ford was made captain and commander of the Texas Ranger, Militia, and Allied Indian Forces
A Kiowa ledger drawing depicting a battle between Southern Plains Indians and the U.S. Army during the Red River War (Battle of Buffalo Wallow September 1874).
Satanta, Kiowa chief
Quanah Parker, the last major chief of the Comanche Indians
Guipago, Kiowa chief

There were not enough Rangers to battle the Comanche at Palo Duro Canyon, for instance, where they could catch them during winter.

Estimated accepted genus totals by kingdom - based on Rees et al., 2020

Colognathus

Genus of extinct reptile from Late Triassic rocks of the southwestern United States.

Genus of extinct reptile from Late Triassic rocks of the southwestern United States.

Estimated accepted genus totals by kingdom - based on Rees et al., 2020

Other finds of Colognathus were from places such as the Palo Duro Canyon (in western Texas) and the Santa Rosa Formation (in New Mexico).

Tierra Blanca Creek

Ephemeral stream about 75 mi long, heading in Curry County, New Mexico, flowing east-northeast across northern portions of the Llano Estacado to join Palo Duro Creek to form the Prairie Dog Town Fork Red River southeast of Amarillo, Texas.

Ephemeral stream about 75 mi long, heading in Curry County, New Mexico, flowing east-northeast across northern portions of the Llano Estacado to join Palo Duro Creek to form the Prairie Dog Town Fork Red River southeast of Amarillo, Texas.

Overall, Tierra Blanca Creek descends 1050 ft from its headwaters in Eastern New Mexico to its confluence with Palo Duro Creek at the head of Palo Duro Canyon.

A group of images by Eadweard Muybridge, set to motion to illustrate the animal's movement

Bison hunting

Activity fundamental to the economy and society of the Plains Indians peoples who inhabited the vast grasslands on the Interior Plains of North America, prior to the animal's near-extinction in the late 19th century following US expansion into the West.

Activity fundamental to the economy and society of the Plains Indians peoples who inhabited the vast grasslands on the Interior Plains of North America, prior to the animal's near-extinction in the late 19th century following US expansion into the West.

A group of images by Eadweard Muybridge, set to motion to illustrate the animal's movement
A bison hunt depicted by George Catlin
Bison and Indians of De Bry, 1595. Pedro Castaneda, a soldier with Coronado on the Southern Plains in 1542, compared the bison with "fish in the sea".
Ulm Pishkun. Buffalo jump, SW of Great Falls, Montana. The Blackfoot drove bison over cliffs in the autumn to secure the winter supply. Animals not killed in the fall were trapped and killed in a corral at the foot of the cliffs. The Blackfoot used pishkuns as late as the 1850s.
Illustration of Indians hunting the bison by Karl Bodmer
Lakota winter count of American Horse, 1817–1818. "The Oglalas had an abundance of buffalo meat and shared it with the Brulés, who were short of food". A bison skin on a frame designates plenty of meat.
Ration Day at the Standing Rock Agency, 1883.
The scarcity of buffalo led Plains Indians to become dependent on US government rations as source of food.
Massacre Canyon battlefield (1873), Nebraska. Pawnee reservation and relevant territories. The last major battle was between two big hunting parties, Lakota and Pawnee. It cost the lives of a minimum of ten children, 20 men and 39 women from the Pawnee tribe, counting Chief Sky Chief. The battle was fought on U.S. ground more than 180 miles outside both reservations.
1892: bison skulls await industrial processing at Michigan Carbon Works in Rogueville (a suburb of Detroit). Bones were processed to be used for glue, fertilizer, dye/tint/ink, or were burned to create "bone char" which was an important component for sugar refining. In the 16th century, North America contained 25–30 million buffalo.
Map of the extermination of the bison to 1889. This map based on William Temple Hornaday's late-19th century research.
Rath & Wright's buffalo hide yard in Dodge City, Kansas, showing 40,000 buffalo hides.
The last tribal hunt of the Omaha, December 1876 to March 1877. After more than 30 camp moves, the hunters finally found a herd 400 miles outside the Omaha Reservation (Nebraska). In 1912, Gilmore secured the account of the hunting expedition into Kansas from Francis La Flesche. La Flesche was one of the Omaha scouts looking for game. (Route approximately).
Skin effigy of a Buffalo used in the Lakota Sun Dance
The reverse of the buffalo nickel paid numismatic tribute, starting in 1913, to the American bison and its rescue from extinction

By saving these few plains bison, she was able to establish an impressive buffalo herd near the Palo Duro Canyon.

Georgia O'Keeffe, Sunrise, watercolor, 1916

Light Coming on the Plains

Name of three watercolor paintings made by Georgia O'Keeffe in 1917.

Name of three watercolor paintings made by Georgia O'Keeffe in 1917.

Georgia O'Keeffe, Sunrise, watercolor, 1916

She began a series of watercolor paintings based upon the scenery and expansive views during her walks, which often included Palo Duro Canyon.

Note: -HU=(1) is a particular affix which adds the meaning 'to accomplish a goal'

Big Red Meat

Nokoni Comanche chief and a leader of Native American resistance against White invasion during the second half of the 19th century.

Nokoni Comanche chief and a leader of Native American resistance against White invasion during the second half of the 19th century.

Note: -HU=(1) is a particular affix which adds the meaning 'to accomplish a goal'

He was also in the battle of Palo Duro Canyon, where the Army destroyed five Native American villages on September 28, 1874.

Mow-way

Mow-way (ca.

Mow-way (ca.

After the attack, Mow-way and the Kotsotekas hid in the Palo Duro Canyon, with their Kwahadi and Nokoni kinsmen and their Kiowa and Southern Cheyenne allies.

List of Park Roads in Texas

Park Roads represent a subset of public roads designated and maintained by the Texas Department of Transportation (TxDOT).

Park Roads represent a subset of public roads designated and maintained by the Texas Department of Transportation (TxDOT).

5) Palo Duro Canyon State Park