Pamela; or, Virtue Rewarded

PamelaPamela, or Virtue RewardedPamela: or, Virtue RewardedPamela, or, Virtue RewardedPamela schiava combattutaPaméla ou la vertu récompenséeSamuel Richardson's ''Pamela; or, Virtue Rewardedtitle for his 1740 novel
Pamela; or, Virtue Rewarded is an epistolary novel by English writer Samuel Richardson, a novel which was first published in 1740.wikipedia
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Samuel Richardson

RichardsonRichardson, Samuel
Pamela; or, Virtue Rewarded is an epistolary novel by English writer Samuel Richardson, a novel which was first published in 1740.
He is best known for his three epistolary novels: Pamela; or, Virtue Rewarded (1740), Clarissa: Or the History of a Young Lady (1748) and The History of Sir Charles Grandison (1753).

Epistolary novel

epistolaryepistolary formepistolary novels
Pamela; or, Virtue Rewarded is an epistolary novel by English writer Samuel Richardson, a novel which was first published in 1740.
The epistolary novel as a genre became popular in the 18th century in the works of such authors as Samuel Richardson, with his immensely successful novels Pamela (1740) and Clarissa (1749).

The History of Sir Charles Grandison

Sir Charles GrandisonCharles Grandison
He revisited the theme of the rake in his Clarissa (1748), and sought to create a "male Pamela" in Sir Charles Grandison (1753).
The novel incorporates an epistolary format similar to Richardson's previous novels, Clarissa and Pamela.

An Apology for the Life of Mrs. Shamela Andrews

ShamelaShamela, or an Apology for the Life of Miss Shamela Andrews
There were also several satires, the most famous being An Apology for the Life of Mrs. Shamela Andrews by Henry Fielding, published under the pseudonym "Mr. Conny Keyber".
It is a direct attack on the then-popular novel Pamela (1740) by Fielding's contemporary and rival Samuel Richardson and is composed, like Pamela, in epistolary form.

The Anti-Pamela; or Feign’d Innocence Detected

The Anti-Pamela; or Feign'd Innocence Detected
Another important satire was The Anti-Pamela; or Feign’d Innocence Detected (1741) by Eliza Haywood.
The Anti-Pamela; or Feign’d Innocence Detected is a 1741 novel written by Eliza Haywood as a satire of the 1740 novel Pamela; or, Virtue Rewarded by Samuel Richardson.

Pamela (paintings)

Pamelaa series of 12 paintingsa series of twelve paintings
Soon afterwards, in 1743, Joseph Highmore produced a series of twelve paintings as the basis for a set of engravings.
They are free adaptations of scenes from the novel Pamela, or Virtue Rewarded by Samuel Richardson.

Henry Fielding

FieldingHenryFielding, Henry
There were also several satires, the most famous being An Apology for the Life of Mrs. Shamela Andrews by Henry Fielding, published under the pseudonym "Mr. Conny Keyber".
Fielding took to novel writing in 1741, angered by Samuel Richardson's success with Pamela; or, Virtue Rewarded.

Clarissa

Clarissa HarloweClarissa, or, the History of a Young LadyClarissa: A History of a Young Lady
He revisited the theme of the rake in his Clarissa (1748), and sought to create a "male Pamela" in Sir Charles Grandison (1753).

Eliza Haywood

Haywood, Elizabeth
Another important satire was The Anti-Pamela; or Feign’d Innocence Detected (1741) by Eliza Haywood.
The Anti-Pamela; or Feign'd Innocence Detected (1741) is a satirical response to Samuel Richardson's didactic novel Pamela, or, Virtue Rewarded (1740).

Francis Hayman

Around 1742 Francis Hayman also produced two paintings drawing on scenes and themes from the novel for supper boxes 12 and 16 at Vauxhall Gardens.
He also illustrated Pamela, a novel by Samuel Richardson, Milton's Paradise Lost and Paradise Regained, Tobias Smollett's translation of Don Quixote, and other well-known works.

Rake (stock character)

rakerakishcad
He revisited the theme of the rake in his Clarissa (1748), and sought to create a "male Pamela" in Sir Charles Grandison (1753). After various unsuccessful attempts at seduction, a series of sexual assaults, and an extended period of kidnapping, the rakish Mr. B eventually reforms and makes Pamela a sincere proposal of marriage.

Marriage plot

marriageplot
In this way, he made her marriage to Mr. B less scandalous as she appeared to be more his equal in education.
Today, few doubt the ennobling qualities of love, but giving that nobility of soul to anyone but nobles was an innovation to be found foundationally in the marriage plot, perhaps pioneered by Richardson's Pamela, wherein a lowly but virtuous maid is raised beyond her birth through her insistent chastity and her subsequent marriage to the lordly Mr. B.

François de Neufchâteau

Nicolas-Louis François de NeufchâteauNeufchâteauNicolas François de Neufchâteau
In France, Boissy put on a Paméla ou la Vertu mieux éprouvée, a verse comedy in three acts (Comédiens italiens ordinaires du Roi, 4 March 1743), followed Neufchâteau's five-act verse comedy Paméla ou la Vertu récompensée (Comédiens Français, 1 August 1793).
In 1793 he was imprisoned on account of his supposed political sentiments, as they were deduced from his drama Paméla ou la vertu récompensée (Théâtre de la Nation, 1 August 1793), but was released the following year with the start of the Thermidorian Reaction.

Pamela hat

Gipsy hat
Mademoiselle Lange's straw hat from the play launched a trend for Pamela hats and bonnets which were worn well into the second half of the nineteenth century.
It was named after the heroine of Samuel Richardson's 1741 novel Pamela; or, Virtue Rewarded.

La buona figliuola

La CecchinaLa Cecchina, ossia La buona figliuolaBuona Figliuola
Pamela was also the basis for the libretto of Niccolò Piccinni's comic opera La buona figliuola.
The libretto, by Carlo Goldoni, is based on Samuel Richardson's novel Pamela; or, Virtue Rewarded.

Comédie-Française

Comédie FrançaiseThéâtre-FrançaisThéâtre Français
In France, Boissy put on a Paméla ou la Vertu mieux éprouvée, a verse comedy in three acts (Comédiens italiens ordinaires du Roi, 4 March 1743), followed Neufchâteau's five-act verse comedy Paméla ou la Vertu récompensée (Comédiens Français, 1 August 1793).
On 3 September 1793, during the French Revolution, the Théâtre de la Nation was closed by order of the Committee of Public Safety for putting on the allegedly seditious play Pamela, and the actors were imprisoned though gradually released later.

Joseph Highmore

Joseph
Soon afterwards, in 1743, Joseph Highmore produced a series of twelve paintings as the basis for a set of engravings.
In 1744, Highmore painted a series of 12 paintings after scenes from Samuel Richardson's Pamela, or Virtue Rewarded, which were engraved by Benoist and Louis Truchy.

Martin Crimp

When We Have Sufficiently Tortured Each Other
Playwright Martin Crimp uses the text as a "provocation" for his stage play When We Have Sufficiently Tortured Each Other: 12 Variations on Samuel Richardson’s Pamela, opening at the Royal National Theatre in 2019 starring Cate Blanchett and Stephen Dillane directed by Katie Mitchell.

Mistress Pamela

It was loosely based on the 1740 novel Pamela, or Virtue Rewarded by Samuel Richardson.

Dazincourt

Jean Dazincourt
Appearing during the French Revolution, Neufchâteau's adaptation was felt to be too Royalist in its sympathies by the Committee of Public Safety, which imprisoned its author and cast (including Anne Françoise Elisabeth Lange and Dazincourt) in the Madelonnettes and Sainte-Pélagie prisons.
During the night of 2 September 1793, he and 12 other actors of the Théâtre Français also felt to have remained faithful to the monarchy were arrested and imprisoned in the prison des Madelonnettes, for putting on the allegedly seditious play "Pamela".

Psychological fiction

psychological novelpsychologicalpsychological drama
The first rise of the psychological novel as a genre is said to have started with the sentimental novel of which Samuel Richardson's Pamela is a prime example.

Royal National Theatre

National TheatreLyttelton TheatreNational Theatre Company
Playwright Martin Crimp uses the text as a "provocation" for his stage play When We Have Sufficiently Tortured Each Other: 12 Variations on Samuel Richardson’s Pamela, opening at the Royal National Theatre in 2019 starring Cate Blanchett and Stephen Dillane directed by Katie Mitchell.

Robert-Martin Lesuire

It was also imitated by Robert-Martin Lesuire in his own novel la Paméla française, ou Lettres d’une jeune paysanne et d’un jeune ci-devant, contenant leurs aventures.