Pan-STARRS

PanSTARRSPan-STARRS 1Pan-STARRS 2Pan-STARRS1Panoramic Survey Telescope And Rapid Response System Panoramic Survey Telescope and Rapid Response SystemPan-STARRS surveyPanSTARSS
The Panoramic Survey Telescope and Rapid Response System (Pan-STARRS1; obs. code: F51 and Pan-STARRS2 obs. code: F52) located at Haleakala Observatory, Hawaii, US, consists of astronomical cameras, telescopes and a computing facility that is surveying the sky for moving or variable objects on a continual basis, and also producing accurate astrometry and photometry of already-detected objects.wikipedia
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Haleakala Observatory

HaleakalaHaleakala Obs.Haleakalā Observatory
code: F52) located at Haleakala Observatory, Hawaii, US, consists of astronomical cameras, telescopes and a computing facility that is surveying the sky for moving or variable objects on a continual basis, and also producing accurate astrometry and photometry of already-detected objects.
The Panoramic Survey Telescope and Rapid Response System (Pan-STARRS) is a planned array of telescopes plus a computing facility that will survey the sky on a continual basis, and provide accurate astrometry and photometry of detected objects.

Astronomical survey

surveysurveyssky survey
code: F52) located at Haleakala Observatory, Hawaii, US, consists of astronomical cameras, telescopes and a computing facility that is surveying the sky for moving or variable objects on a continual basis, and also producing accurate astrometry and photometry of already-detected objects.

Asteroid

asteroidsminor bodyMinor Planet
By detecting differences from previous observations of the same areas of the sky, Pan-STARRS is discovering many new asteroids, comets, variable stars, supernovae and other celestial objects.

List of observatory codes

Pla D'ArguinesFountain HillsDauban
code: F52) located at Haleakala Observatory, Hawaii, US, consists of astronomical cameras, telescopes and a computing facility that is surveying the sky for moving or variable objects on a continual basis, and also producing accurate astrometry and photometry of already-detected objects. The Panoramic Survey Telescope and Rapid Response System (Pan-STARRS1; obs. code: F51 and Pan-STARRS2 obs.

ʻOumuamua

Oumuamua1I/ʻOumuamua1I/2017 U1 (ʻOumuamua)
In 2017, Pan-STARRS detected the first known interstellar object, 1I/2017 U1 ‘Oumuamua, passing through the Solar System.
Formally designated 1I/2017 U1, it was discovered by Robert Weryk using the Pan-STARRS telescope at Haleakala Observatory, Hawaii, on 19 October 2017, 40 days after it passed its closest point to the Sun on 9 September.

Nick Kaiser

Nicholas Kaiser
Nick Kaiser, principal investigator of the Pan-STARRS project, summed it up saying “PS1 has been taking science-quality data for six months, but now we are doing it dusk-to-dawn every night.” (quote: June 15, 2010).
Kaiser was the initiator and Principal Investigator of the PanSTARRS imaging survey of most of the sky.

Apparent magnitude

apparent visual magnitudemagnitudevisual magnitude
Its primary mission is now to detect Near-Earth Objects that threaten impact events and it is expected to create a database of all objects visible from Hawaii (three-quarters of the entire sky) down to apparent magnitude 24.

Haleakalā

HaleakalaEast MauiHaleakala Crater
The first Pan-STARRS telescope (PS1) is located at the summit of Haleakalā on Maui, Hawaii, and went online on December 6, 2008, under the administration of the University of Hawaii. Pan-STARRS currently (2018) consists of two 1.8 m Ritchey–Chrétien telescopes located at Haleakala in Hawaii.
Nevertheless, new telescopes are added, such as the Pan-STARRS in 2006.

Ritchey–Chrétien telescope

Ritchey–ChrétienRitchey-ChrétienRitchey-Chrétien telescope
Pan-STARRS currently (2018) consists of two 1.8 m Ritchey–Chrétien telescopes located at Haleakala in Hawaii.

Kuiper belt

Kuiper belt objectKuiper belt objectsKuiper cliff
In addition to the large number of expected discoveries in the asteroid belt, Pan-STARRS is expected to detect at least 100,000 Jupiter trojans (compared to 2900 known as of end-2008); at least 20,000 Kuiper belt objects (compared to 800 known as of mid-2005); thousands of trojan asteroids of Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune (currently eight Neptune trojans are known, none for Saturn, and one for Uranus ); and large numbers of centaurs and comets.
The precise origins of the Kuiper belt and its complex structure are still unclear, and astronomers are awaiting the completion of several wide-field survey telescopes such as Pan-STARRS and the future LSST, which should reveal many currently unknown KBOs.

Mikulski Archive for Space Telescopes

MAST
The data reside in the Mikulski Archive for Space Telescopes (MAST).
The archive contains the data from a number of instruments like Pan-Starrs, Kepler, and TESS, as well as data for the Hubble Space telescope (HST) and soon to launch James Webb Space Telescope (JWST).

C/2011 L4

C/2011 L4 (PANSTARRS)C/2011 L4 Pan-StarrsComet PANSTARRS
It was discovered using the Pan-STARRS telescope located near the summit of Haleakalā, on the island of Maui in Hawaii.

Interstellar object

interstellar cometrogue cometinterstellar
In 2017, Pan-STARRS detected the first known interstellar object, 1I/2017 U1 ‘Oumuamua, passing through the Solar System.
A dim object was discovered on October 19, 2017 by the Pan-STARRS telescope, at an apparent magnitude of 20.

Large Synoptic Survey Telescope

LSSTLarge Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST)
This is more than three times the etendue of best existing telescopes, the Subaru Telescope with its Hyper Suprime Camera, and Pan-STARRS, and more than an order of magnitude better than most large telescopes.

Nemesis (hypothetical star)

Nemesishypothetical companion starNemesis Hypothesis
Also, by identifying stars with large parallax but very small proper motion for follow-up radial velocity measurements, Pan-STARRS may even be able to permit the detection of hypothetical Nemesis-type objects if these actually exist.
If Nemesis exists, it may be detected by Pan-STARRS or the planned LSST astronomical surveys.

Camera

camerasstill cameraplate camera
code: F52) located at Haleakala Observatory, Hawaii, US, consists of astronomical cameras, telescopes and a computing facility that is surveying the sky for moving or variable objects on a continual basis, and also producing accurate astrometry and photometry of already-detected objects.

Telescope

telescopestelescopicspyglass
code: F52) located at Haleakala Observatory, Hawaii, US, consists of astronomical cameras, telescopes and a computing facility that is surveying the sky for moving or variable objects on a continual basis, and also producing accurate astrometry and photometry of already-detected objects.

Astrometry

astrometricastrometristastrometrical
code: F52) located at Haleakala Observatory, Hawaii, US, consists of astronomical cameras, telescopes and a computing facility that is surveying the sky for moving or variable objects on a continual basis, and also producing accurate astrometry and photometry of already-detected objects.

Photometry (astronomy)

photometricphotometryphotometrically
code: F52) located at Haleakala Observatory, Hawaii, US, consists of astronomical cameras, telescopes and a computing facility that is surveying the sky for moving or variable objects on a continual basis, and also producing accurate astrometry and photometry of already-detected objects.

Petabyte

PBpetabytes1PB
At 1.6 petabytes, it is the largest volume of astronomical data ever released.

Institute for Astronomy

IfA
Neo-chart.png detected by various projects:The Pan-STARRS Project is a collaboration between the University of Hawaii Institute for Astronomy, MIT Lincoln Laboratory, Maui High Performance Computing Center and Science Applications International Corporation. Telescope construction was funded by the U.S. Air Force.

Massachusetts Institute of Technology

MITM.I.T.Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)
Neo-chart.png detected by various projects:The Pan-STARRS Project is a collaboration between the University of Hawaii Institute for Astronomy, MIT Lincoln Laboratory, Maui High Performance Computing Center and Science Applications International Corporation. Telescope construction was funded by the U.S. Air Force.

MIT Lincoln Laboratory

Lincoln LaboratoryLincoln Laboratory's Experimental Test SiteLincoln Lab's ETS
Neo-chart.png detected by various projects:The Pan-STARRS Project is a collaboration between the University of Hawaii Institute for Astronomy, MIT Lincoln Laboratory, Maui High Performance Computing Center and Science Applications International Corporation. Telescope construction was funded by the U.S. Air Force.

Air Force Maui Optical and Supercomputing observatory

AMOSAir Force Maui Optical and SupercomputingAir Force Maui Optical Station
Neo-chart.png detected by various projects:The Pan-STARRS Project is a collaboration between the University of Hawaii Institute for Astronomy, MIT Lincoln Laboratory, Maui High Performance Computing Center and Science Applications International Corporation. Telescope construction was funded by the U.S. Air Force.