Panic (play)

PanicPanic'' (play)
Panic is a 1935 verse play by Archibald MacLeish.wikipedia
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Orson Welles

WellesWellesianWelles, Orson
First presented March 14–16, 1935, at the Imperial Theatre in Manhattan, the production featured Orson Welles's first leading performance on the American stage. Paul Muni was approached but then, to the exasperation of MacLeish, Houseman offered the part to a young actor he had seen playing Tybalt in Katherine Cornell's production of Romeo and Juliet—19-year-old Orson Welles.
The Broadway production brought the 19-year-old Welles (now playing Tybalt) to the notice of John Houseman, a theatrical producer who was casting the lead role in the debut production of Archibald MacLeish's verse play, Panic.

Archibald MacLeish

MacLeishArchibaldArchibald McLeish
Panic is a 1935 verse play by Archibald MacLeish.
By the 1930s, he considered Capitalism to be "symbolically dead" and wrote the verse play Panic (1935) in response.

John Houseman

Houseman, JohnJohn Houseman ProductionsJohn Houseman Studio Theater
Panic was produced by John Houseman and Nathan Zarkin as the first project of their new Phoenix Theatre. Rejected by the Theatre Guild, Jed Harris and others, MacLeish took the play to producer John Houseman, who was setting himself apart by perversely cultivating a reputation for taking on noncommercial or difficult-to-stage plays.
In 1934, Houseman was looking to cast Panic, a play he was producing based on a drama by Archibald MacLeish concerning a Wall Street financier whose world crumbles about him when consumed by the crash of 1929.

Imperial Theatre

Imperial TheaterImperial TheatImperial Theatres
First presented March 14–16, 1935, at the Imperial Theatre in Manhattan, the production featured Orson Welles's first leading performance on the American stage.
1935: Panic

Bank run

runrun on the bankbanking crisis
The drama is set during the bank panic of 1933 and concerns the fall of the world's richest man, a banker named McGafferty.
The bank panic of 1933 is the setting of Archibald MacLeish's 1935 play, Panic.

Great Depression

Depressionthe Great DepressionDepression-era
A tragedy that is one of the author's least-known works, it was written during the sixth year of the Great Depression.

Emergency Banking Act

bank holidayMarch Bank Holidaybanking holiday
The drama is set during the bank panic of 1933 and concerns the fall of the world's richest man, a banker named McGafferty.

Jo Mielziner

Sets and lighting were designed by Jo Mielziner; Martha Graham directed the movements of the chorus.

Martha Graham

GrahamMartha Graham Dance CompanyGraham technique
Sets and lighting were designed by Jo Mielziner; Martha Graham directed the movements of the chorus.

Fortune (magazine)

FortuneFortune MagazineFortune'' magazine
He was happy to find a job at Fortune magazine, one that was flexible enough to allow him to continue his writing.

Theatre Guild

New York Theatre GuildThe Theatre GuildTheatre Guild of New York
Rejected by the Theatre Guild, Jed Harris and others, MacLeish took the play to producer John Houseman, who was setting himself apart by perversely cultivating a reputation for taking on noncommercial or difficult-to-stage plays.

Jed Harris

Rejected by the Theatre Guild, Jed Harris and others, MacLeish took the play to producer John Houseman, who was setting himself apart by perversely cultivating a reputation for taking on noncommercial or difficult-to-stage plays.

J. P. Morgan

J.P. MorganJ. Pierpont MorganJohn Pierpont Morgan
Casting the leading role of McGafferty, a 60-year-old financier modeled on J. P. Morgan, was difficult.

Paul Muni

Moony Weisenfreund
Paul Muni was approached but then, to the exasperation of MacLeish, Houseman offered the part to a young actor he had seen playing Tybalt in Katherine Cornell's production of Romeo and Juliet—19-year-old Orson Welles.

Provincetown Players

The Provincetown Players
James Light of the Provincetown Players was director.

The New Masses

New MassesThe ''New MassesThe Liberator
A third performance was scheduled March 16 when the magazines New Theatre and The New Masses bought out the house at a cost of $1,000 and offered a panel discussion on the stage after the show.

CBS Radio

CBSCBS Radio NetworkInfinity Broadcasting
On March 22, 1935, Welles made his debut on the CBS Radio series The March of Time, performing a scene from Panic for a news report on the stage production He continued to work as a member of the radio show's repertory cast for three years.

The March of Time (radio program)

The March of TimeMarch of Timeradio
On March 22, 1935, Welles made his debut on the CBS Radio series The March of Time, performing a scene from Panic for a news report on the stage production He continued to work as a member of the radio show's repertory cast for three years.

The Fall of the City

In April 1937 Welles was the Voice of the Announcer in the CBS broadcast of MacLeish's The Fall of the City, the first American verse play written for radio.