Papal coronation

crownedcoronationsolemnly crownedconsecratedcoronation ceremonycoronationsceremonycoronation ceremoniescoronation of a popecrown
A papal coronation was the ceremony of the placing of the papal tiara on a newly elected pope.wikipedia
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Papal tiara

tiaraTriple Tiaratriregnum
A papal coronation was the ceremony of the placing of the papal tiara on a newly elected pope.
From 1143 to 1963, the papal tiara was solemnly placed on the pope's head during a papal coronation.

Papal Mass

It began with a solemn Papal Mass.
It is celebrated on such occasions as a papal coronation, an ex cathedra pronouncement, the canonization of a saint, on Easter or Christmas or other major feast days.

Enthronement

installedenthronedascended
The episcopal enthronement of the pope takes place in his cathedral, the Archbasilica of St. John Lateran.
Popes were traditionally enthroned and crowned with the papal tiara in the Archbasilica of Saint John Lateran.

Sic transit gloria mundi

Finis Gloriae MundiEnd of worldly glorySic Transit Gloria
Three times, the procession was stopped, and a bundle of flax lashed to a gilded staff was burnt before the newly elected pontiff, while a master of ceremonies said: Pater Sancte, sic transit gloria mundi (Holy Father, thus passes the glory of the world) as a symbolic reminder to set aside materialism and vanity.
The phrase was used in the ritual of papal coronation ceremonies between 1409 (when it was used at the coronation of Alexander V) and 1963.

List of papal tiaras in existence

papier-mâché tiaraPalatine TiaraBelgian Tiara
Since the French seized the tiara along with the previous pope, he was crowned with a papier-mâché tiara, for which the ladies of Venice gave up their jewels.
The papal tiara is the crown worn by popes of the Catholic Church for centuries, until 1978 when Pope John Paul I declined a coronation, opting instead for an inauguration.

Sedia gestatoria

ceremonial chair
Following this, at least from the beginning of the 16th century, the newly elected pope was carried in state through St. Peter's Basilica on the sedia gestatoria, under a white canopy, with the papal flabella (ceremonial fans) to either side.
It was used in the solemn ceremonies of the coronation of a new pope until the enthronement ceremony was abandoned altogether.

Papal inauguration

inaugurationa solemn ceremony of the inauguration of the pontificateenthroned
None of his successors have used the tiara, and their papal inauguration celebrations have included no coronation ceremony. Nevertheless, his successor, John Paul I, opted not to be crowned and to have a less formal "solemn Mass to mark the start of his ministry as Supreme Pastor" in September 1978.
Since the inauguration of Pope John Paul I, it has not included the 820-year-old (1143–1963) papal coronation ceremony.

Pope Pius VI

Pius VIGiovanni Angelo BraschiPope
In 1800 Pope Pius VII was crowned in the crowded church of the Benedictine island monastery of San Giorgio, Venice, after his late predecessor, Pope Pius VI, had been forced into temporary exile during Napoleon Bonaparte's capture of Rome.
He was consecrated into the episcopate on 22 February 1775 by Cardinal Gian Francesco Albani and was crowned that same day by the Cardinal Protodeacon Alessandro Albani.

Prisoner in the Vatican

prisoner of the Vaticanprisoners in the Vaticanprisoners of the Vatican
During the "prisoner in the Vatican" period, the enthronement did not take place.
During this period, popes granted the Urbi et Orbi blessings from a balcony facing a courtyard, or from inside the basilica, and papal coronations were instead held at the Sistine Chapel.

Pope Pius VII

Pius VIIBarnaba Chiaramontia supreme pope
In 1800 Pope Pius VII was crowned in the crowded church of the Benedictine island monastery of San Giorgio, Venice, after his late predecessor, Pope Pius VI, had been forced into temporary exile during Napoleon Bonaparte's capture of Rome.
He was crowned on 21 March in a rather unusual ceremony, wearing a papier-mâché papal tiara as the French had seized the tiaras held by the Holy See when occupying Rome and forcing Pius VI into exile.

Pope John Paul II

John Paul IIKarol WojtyłaKarol Wojtyla
After John Paul I's sudden death following a thirty-three-day reign, the new pope, John Paul II, opted to copy his predecessor's ceremony without coronation.
Like his predecessor, John Paul II dispensed with the traditional Papal coronation and instead received ecclesiastical investiture with a simplified Papal inauguration on 22 October 1978.

Pope Paul VI

Paul VIGiovanni Battista MontiniGiovanni Montini
The last was the 1963 coronation of Paul VI, who soon afterwards abandoned the practice of wearing the tiara.
He was the last pope to date to be crowned on 30 June 1963 ; his successor Pope John Paul I substituted an inauguration for the papal coronation (which Paul had substantially modified, but which he left mandatory in his 1975 apostolic constitution Romano Pontifici Eligendo).

Pope Pius XII

Pius XIIEugenio PacelliCardinal Pacelli
Popes Pius IX, Pius XII, and John XXIII, all were crowned in public on the balcony of the basilica, facing crowds assembled below in St. Peter's Square.
His coronation took place on 12 March 1939.

1154 papal election

papal election, 1154December 1154papal election of 1154
He took the name Adrian IV and was crowned on 5 December 1154 in the Vatican Basilica.

Pope

PapacypapalBishop of Rome
A papal coronation was the ceremony of the placing of the papal tiara on a newly elected pope.
Until 1978 the pope's election was followed in a few days by the Papal coronation, which started with a procession with great pomp and circumstance from the Sistine Chapel to St. Peter's Basilica, with the newly elected pope borne in the sedia gestatoria.

Cope

cappa magnamantumcappa
In the 11th and 12th centuries, the immantatio, or bestowal of the mantum (a papal vestment consisting of a very long red cope fastened with an elaborate morse) on the newly elected pope was regarded as especially symbolic of investiture with papal authority, and was conferred with the words: "I invest thee with the Roman papacy, that thou rule over the city and the world."
In the eleventh and twelfth centuries the immantatio, or bestowal of the mantum on the newly elected pope, was regarded as specially symbolical of investiture with papal authority: Investio te de papatu romano ut praesis urbi et orbi, "I invest you with the Roman papacy, that you may rule over the city and the world" were the words used in conferring it at the papal coronation.

Papal conclave

conclaveconclavespapal election
When a conclave elects a new pope, he assumes all of the rights and authority of the papacy immediately upon his acceptance of election; however, popes traditionally numbered their regnal years from the date of their coronation.
Formerly, the pope would later be crowned by the triregnum or Triple Tiara at the Papal Coronation.

Pope John XXIII

John XXIIIAngelo RoncalliAngelo Giuseppe Roncalli
Popes Pius IX, Pius XII, and John XXIII, all were crowned in public on the balcony of the basilica, facing crowds assembled below in St. Peter's Square.
His papal coronation ran for the traditional five hours (Pope Paul VI, by contrast, opted for a shorter ceremony, while later popes declined to be crowned).

Urbi et Orbi

Apostolic BlessingUrbi et orb
Following his coronation, the pope imparted the solemn papal blessing Urbi et Orbi.

Pope Clement V

Clement VBertrand de GotBertrand de Goth
At Bordeaux, Bertrand was formally notified of his election and urged to come to Italy, but he selected Lyon for his coronation on 14 November 1305, which was celebrated with magnificence and attended by Philip IV.

Pope John Paul I

John Paul IPopes John Paul IAlbino Luciani
Nevertheless, his successor, John Paul I, opted not to be crowned and to have a less formal "solemn Mass to mark the start of his ministry as Supreme Pastor" in September 1978.
He refused to have the millennium-old traditional papal coronation or wear the papal tiara.

Universi Dominici gregis

John Paul II's 1996 Apostolic Constitution, Universi Dominici gregis, now in force, does not specify the form that the "solemn ceremony of the inauguration of the pontificate" of a new pope should take, whether with or without a coronation.

Romano Pontifici eligendo

Though he decided to cease wearing a papal tiara within weeks of his coronation, and laid his own on the altar of St. Peter's Basilica in a gesture of humility, his 1975 Apostolic Constitution, Romano Pontifici Eligendo, still prescribed that "the new pontiff is to be crowned by the senior cardinal deacon".
Nevertheless, in this apostolic constitution he wrote that a coronation would follow the election.

Pope Clement X

Clement XEmilio Bonaventura AltieriEmilio Altieri
He persisted in refusing, protesting that he no longer had strength or memory; eventually, with tears he accepted, and out of gratitude to his benefactor, by ten years his junior, he assumed the name of Clement X. He was crowned on 11 May.

Pope Pius III

Pius IIIFrancesco PiccolominiFrancesco Todeschini-Piccolomini
He participated in the conclave of 1484 which resulted in the election of Pope Innocent VIII and as the protodeacon announced the election and performed the coronation of the new pope.