Paperback

trade paperbackSoftcovermass market paperbackmass-market paperbackpaperback originalpaperback booktrade paperbackspaperback bookspaperbackssoftback
A paperback, also known as a softcover or softback, is a type of book characterized by a thick paper or paperboard cover, and often held together with glue rather than stitches or staples.wikipedia
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Airport novel

airport paperbacks
Inexpensive books bound in paper have existed since at least the 19th century in such forms as pamphlets, yellowbacks, dime novels, and airport novels.
Airport novels are typically mass-market paperback books.

Penguin Books

PenguinPenguin IndiaPenguin Canada
It proved an immediate financial success in the United Kingdom in 1935 when Penguin Books adopted many of Albatross' innovations, including a conspicuous logo and color-coded covers for different genres.
Penguin revolutionised publishing in the 1930s through its inexpensive paperbacks, sold through Woolworths and other high street stores for sixpence, bringing high-quality paperback fiction and non-fiction to the mass market.

Tauchnitz publishers

TauchnitzBernhard TauchnitzTauchnitz Editions
Bernhard Tauchnitz started the Collection of British and American Authors in 1841.
These inexpensive paperbound editions, a direct precursor to mass-market paperbacks, were begun in 1841, and eventually ran to over 5,000 volumes.

Book

booksmonographbiblio
A paperback, also known as a softcover or softback, is a type of book characterized by a thick paper or paperboard cover, and often held together with glue rather than stitches or staples.
If the book is a hardback its path through the bindery will involve more points of activity than if it is a paperback.

Allen Lane

Sir Allen LaneAllen Lane Williams Lane
British publisher Allen Lane invested his own financial capital to launch the Penguin Books imprint in 1935, initiating the paperback revolution in the English-language book market by releasing ten reprint titles.
Sir Allen Lane (born Allen Lane Williams; 21 September 1902 – 7 July 1970) was a British publisher who together with his brothers Richard and John Lane founded Penguin Books in 1935, bringing high-quality paperback fiction and non-fiction to the mass market.

Albatross Books

AlbatrosAlbatross
The German publisher Albatross Books revised the 20th-century mass-market paperback format in 1931, but the approach of World War II cut the experiment short.
Albatross Books was a German publishing house based in Hamburg that produced the first modern mass-market paperback books.

Pocket Books

Wanderer BooksPocket StarJuno Books
In 1939, Robert de Graaf issued a similar line in the United States, partnering with Simon & Schuster to create the Pocket Books label.
Pocket Books is a division of Simon & Schuster that primarily publishes paperback books.

Armed Services Editions

Armed Services Edition
In World War II, the U.S. military distributed some 122 million "Armed Services Editions" paperback novels to the troops, which helped popularize the format after the war.
Armed Services Editions (ASEs) were small paperback books of fiction and nonfiction that were distributed in the American military during World War II.

Avon (publisher)

Avon BooksAvonAvon Comics
In the United States, many companies entered the paperback publishing field in the years after Pocket Books' inception, including Ace, Dell, Bantam, Avon and dozens of other smaller publishers.
At Avon's initial stages, it was an American paperback book and comic book publisher.

Gold Medal Books

Fawcett Gold MedalGold MedalGold Meda
At first, paperbacks consisted entirely of reprints, but in 1950, Fawcett Publications' Gold Medal Books began publishing original works in paperback.
Gold Medal Books, launched by Fawcett Publications in 1950, was a U.S. book publisher known for introducing paperback originals, a publishing innovation at the time.

Bantam Books

BantamBantam PublishingBantam Dell
In the United States, many companies entered the paperback publishing field in the years after Pocket Books' inception, including Ace, Dell, Bantam, Avon and dozens of other smaller publishers.
By that time Bantam was the largest publisher of paperbacks, had over 15% of the market, and exceeded US$100 million in sales.

New American Library

Signet BooksSignetSignet/New American Library
Fawcett was also an independent newsstand distributor, and in 1945, the company negotiated a contract with New American Library to distribute their Mentor and Signet titles.
Its initial focus was affordable paperback reprints of classics and scholarly works, as well as popular and pulp fiction but now publishes trade and hardcover titles.

Dell Publishing

Delacorte PressDellDell Books
In the United States, many companies entered the paperback publishing field in the years after Pocket Books' inception, including Ace, Dell, Bantam, Avon and dozens of other smaller publishers.
In 1943, Dell entered into paperback book publishing with Dell Paperbacks.

Fawcett Publications

FawcettFawcett BooksFawcett Crest
At first, paperbacks consisted entirely of reprints, but in 1950, Fawcett Publications' Gold Medal Books began publishing original works in paperback.
His bawdy cartoon and joke magazine, Captain Billy's Whiz Bang, became the launch pad for a vast publishing empire embracing magazines, comic books and paperback books.

Lost Horizon

novelnovel of the same name
Because of its number-one position in what became a very long list of pocket editions, James Hilton's Lost Horizon is often cited as the first American paperback book.
What made Pocket Book #1 of revolutionary importance was that it was the first "mass-market" paperback; mass market paperbacks allowed people of modest means not only to own books they otherwise could not afford, but also to slip the paperback into their pocket for casual reading on the go, hence the name "Pocket Book".

Stripped book

book missing its front coverpulp
The copyright page often carries a warning that anyone who buys a book missing its front cover should assume that the publisher has received no payment and the author has received no royalties for that copy.
A stripped book is a mass market paperback that has been stripped of its cover in order to be pulped and recycled as a result of lack of sales.

Harlequin Enterprises

HarlequinHarlequin RomanceHarlequin Enterprises Ltd
Canadian mass-market paperback initiatives in the 1940s included White Circle Books, a subsidiary of Collins (U.K.); it was fairly successful but was soon outstripped by the success of Harlequin which began in 1949 and, after a few years of publishing undistinguished novels, focused on the romance genre and became one of the world's largest publishers.
North American booksellers were reluctant to stock mass market paperbacks, and Harlequin chose to sell their books "where the women are", distributing them in supermarkets and other retail stores.

Edition (book)

first editionprint runedition
He purchased paperback rights from publishers, ordered large print runs (such as 20,000 copies—large for the time) to keep unit prices low, and looked to non-traditional book-selling retail locations.
Publishers often use the same typesetting for the hardcover and trade paperback versions of a book.

Hardcover

Hardbacktrade hardcoverHardbound
In contrast, hardcover or hardback books are bound with cardboard covered with cloth, plastic or leather.
Hardcover books are often printed on acid-free paper, and they are much more durable than paperbacks, which have flexible, easily damaged paper covers.

Bunkobon

bunkovolumescompilation
In Japan, bunkobon are small-format paperback books, designed to be affordable and space saving.

Romance novel

Romanceromance novelsRomantic novel
In 1982, romance novels accounted for at least 25% of all paperback sales.
Aside from its content, the book was revolutionary in that it was one of the first single-title romance novels to be published as an original paperback, rather than being first published in hardcover, and, like the category romances, was distributed in drug stores and other mass-market merchandising outlets.

Bookbinding

bookbinderbindingbound
A mass-market paperback is a small, usually non-illustrated, inexpensive bookbinding format.
Library binding refers to the hardcover binding of books intended for the rigors of library use and are largely serials and paperback publications.

Earle K. Bergey

Earle Bergey
The leading paperback publishers often hired experienced pulp magazine cover artists, including Rudolph Belarski and Earle K. Bergey, who helped create the look and feel of paperbacks and set an appealing visual standard that continues to this day.

DC Comics

DCDC EntertainmentDC Comic
Examples include Marvel Comics' Secret War and DC Comics' Watchmen among many others.
These titles helped pave the way for comics to be more widely accepted in literary-criticism circles and to make inroads into the book industry, with collected editions of these series as commercially successful trade paperbacks.

Kenneth C. Davis

Davis, Kenneth C.Kenneth Davis
Davis's first book, Two-Bit Culture: The Paperbacking of America, offers an overview of the history of paperback books, although some publishers, such as Walter Zacharius and Irwin Stein's Lancer Books, were given little coverage.