Paradise Lost

epic poemsame nameAwake, arise, or be forever fall'n.book by the same nameepic poem of the same namehis old adversaryJohn Milton's Paradise LostLucifer's fallPair o' dice LostParadise Los
Paradise Lost is an epic poem in blank verse by the 17th-century English poet John Milton (1608–1674).wikipedia
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John Milton

MiltonMiltonicMiltonian
Paradise Lost is an epic poem in blank verse by the 17th-century English poet John Milton (1608–1674).
He wrote at a time of religious flux and political upheaval, and is best known for his epic poem Paradise Lost (1667), written in blank verse.

Satan

the DevilDevilLucifer
The poem concerns the biblical story of the Fall of Man: the temptation of Adam and Eve by the fallen angel Satan and their expulsion from the Garden of Eden. Milton's story has two narrative arcs, one about Satan (Lucifer) and the other following Adam and Eve.
Satan appears frequently in Christian literature, most notably in Dante Alighieri's Inferno, variants of the Faust legend, John Milton's Paradise Lost and Paradise Regained, and the poems of William Blake.

Blank verse

blank-verserhyme is not employed at allShi'r musal
Paradise Lost is an epic poem in blank verse by the 17th-century English poet John Milton (1608–1674).
The major achievements in English blank verse were made by William Shakespeare, who wrote much of the content of his plays in unrhymed iambic pentameter, and John Milton, whose Paradise Lost is written in blank verse.

Moloch

MolechMilcomDelivering one's child to Moloch
Belial and Moloch are also present.
Moloch has been used figuratively in English literature from John Milton's Paradise Lost (1667) to Allen Ginsberg's "Howl" (1955), to refer to a person or thing demanding or requiring a very costly sacrifice.

Pandæmonium (Paradise Lost)

PandæmoniumPandemoniumPandaemonium
In Pandæmonium, the capital city of Hell, Satan employs his rhetorical skill to organize his followers; he is aided by Mammon and Beelzebub.
Pandæmonium is the capital of Hell in John Milton's epic poem Paradise Lost.

War in Heaven

Fall of the AngelsAnd war broke out in HeavenWar of Heaven
At several points in the poem, an Angelic War over Heaven is recounted from different perspectives.
Several modern Bible-commentators view the "war in heaven" in Revelation 12:7–13 as an eschatological vision of the end of time or as a reference to spiritual warfare within the church, rather than (as in Milton's Paradise Lost) "the story of the origin of Satan/Lucifer as an angel who rebelled against God in primeval times."

In medias res

in media resbegins in the middle of the actionimmediately before a final battle over Paradise Falls
The poem follows the epic tradition of starting in medias res (Latin for in the midst of things), the background story being recounted later.
14th century), the Italian Divine Comedy (1320) by Dante Alighieri, the Portuguese The Lusiads (1572) by Luís de Camões, Jerusalem Delivered (1581) by Torquato Tasso, Paradise Lost (1667) by John Milton, and generally in Modernist literature.

Aeneid

The AeneidÆneidAEneis
A second edition followed in 1674, arranged into twelve books (in the manner of Virgil's Aeneid) with minor revisions throughout.
The strong influence of the Aeneid has been identified in the development of European vernacular literatures—some English works that show its influence being Beowulf, Layamon's Brut (through the source text Historia Regum Britanniae), The Faerie Queene and Milton's Paradise Lost.

Adam and Eve

AdamEveAdam & Eve
The poem concerns the biblical story of the Fall of Man: the temptation of Adam and Eve by the fallen angel Satan and their expulsion from the Garden of Eden. Milton's story has two narrative arcs, one about Satan (Lucifer) and the other following Adam and Eve.
John Milton's Paradise Lost, a famous 17th-century epic poem written in blank verse, explores and elaborates upon the story of Adam and Eve in great detail.

Lucifer

Angel LuciferDevilHelel
Milton's story has two narrative arcs, one about Satan (Lucifer) and the other following Adam and Eve.
As a result, "Lucifer has become a byword for Satan or the devil in the church and in popular literature", as in Dante Alighieri's Inferno, Joost van den Vondel's Lucifer, and John Milton's Paradise Lost.

Belial

BeliarBeliallof the same name
Belial and Moloch are also present.
*John Milton, Paradise Lost, Book I

Beelzebub

BeelzebulBelzebuthBaalzebul
In Pandæmonium, the capital city of Hell, Satan employs his rhetorical skill to organize his followers; he is aided by Mammon and Beelzebub.
John Milton, in his epic poem Paradise Lost, first published in 1667, identified an unholy trinity consisting of Beelzebub, Lucifer, and Astaroth, with Beelzebub as the second-ranking of the many fallen angels.

Garden of Eden

EdenThe Garden of EdenEarthly Paradise
The poem concerns the biblical story of the Fall of Man: the temptation of Adam and Eve by the fallen angel Satan and their expulsion from the Garden of Eden.
Much of Milton's Paradise Lost occurs in the Garden of Eden.

Mammon

mammonismMamonaMamony
In Pandæmonium, the capital city of Hell, Satan employs his rhetorical skill to organize his followers; he is aided by Mammon and Beelzebub.
Milton's Paradise Lost describes a fallen angel who values earthly treasure over all other things.

Milton's divorce tracts

divorce tractsJohn Milton's divorce tractsa series of pamphlets
Although Milton does not directly mention divorce, critics posit theories on Milton's view of divorce based upon their inferences from the poem and from his tracts on divorce written earlier in his life.
Although the tracts were met with nothing but hostility and he later rued publishing them in English at all, they are important for analysing the relationship between Adam and Eve in his epic Paradise Lost.

Fallen angel

fallen angelsFallenfall
The poem concerns the biblical story of the Fall of Man: the temptation of Adam and Eve by the fallen angel Satan and their expulsion from the Garden of Eden. It begins after Satan and the other rebel angels have been defeated and banished to Hell, or, as it is also called in the poem, Tartarus.
In John Milton's 17th-century epic poem Paradise Lost, both obedient and fallen angels play an important role.

Fall of man

Fallthe FallThe Fall of Man
The poem concerns the biblical story of the Fall of Man: the temptation of Adam and Eve by the fallen angel Satan and their expulsion from the Garden of Eden.

Hell

eternal punishmentinfernoinfernal
It begins after Satan and the other rebel angels have been defeated and banished to Hell, or, as it is also called in the poem, Tartarus.
John Milton's Paradise Lost (1667) opens with the fallen angels, including their leader Satan, waking up in Hell after having been defeated in the war in heaven and the action returns there at several points throughout the poem.

John Baptist Medina

Sir John Baptist MedinaSir John Baptiste de MedinaSir John Medina
The first illustrations to accompany the text of Paradise Lost were added to the fourth edition of 1688, with one engraving prefacing each book, of which up to eight of the twelve were by Sir John Baptist Medina, one by Bernard Lens II, and perhaps up to four (including Books I and XII, perhaps the most memorable) by another hand.
Sir John Baptist Medina or John Baptiste de Medina (1659 – 5 October 1710) was an artist of Flemish-Spanish origin who worked in England and Scotland, mostly as a portrait painter, though he was also the first illustrator of Paradise Lost by John Milton in 1688.

Paradise Lost in popular culture

Paradise Lost'' in popular culture
Paradise Lost has had a profound impact on writers, artists and illustrators, and, in the twentieth century, filmmakers.

Michael (archangel)

Saint MichaelArchangel MichaelMichael
In a vision shown to him by the Archangel Michael, Adam witnesses everything that will happen to Mankind until the Great Flood.
In the English epic poem Paradise Lost by John Milton, Michael commands the army of angels loyal to God against the rebel forces of Satan.

John Milton's poetic style

Although Milton wrote earlier poetry, his influence is largely grounded in his later poems: Paradise Lost, Paradise Regained, and Samson Agonistes.

Adam

the first humanAadam Safiyullaahabove
Adam is the first human being created by God.

Christian mythology

ChristianBiblical mythologyChristian folklore
Multiple commentators have classified John Milton's epic poem Paradise Lost as a work of Christian mythology.

Prince of Darkness (Satan)

Prince of DarknessSatan
The Prince of Darkness is a term used in John Milton's poem Paradise Lost referring to Satan as the embodiment of evil.