Park Chung-hee

Park Chung HeePark Jung-HeeChung Hee ParkParkPark Chung-hee (acting)Pak Chung HeePark ChungheePark Jeong-heePresident ParkPresident Park Chung-hee
Park Chung-hee (14 November 1917 – 26 October 1979) was a South Korean politician and general who served as the President of South Korea from 1963 until his assassination in 1979, assuming that office after first ruling the country as head of a military dictatorship installed by the May 16 military coup d'état in 1961.wikipedia
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Assassination of Park Chung-hee

assassinatedassassinationhis assassination
Park Chung-hee (14 November 1917 – 26 October 1979) was a South Korean politician and general who served as the President of South Korea from 1963 until his assassination in 1979, assuming that office after first ruling the country as head of a military dictatorship installed by the May 16 military coup d'état in 1961.
Park Chung-hee, the third President of South Korea, was assassinated on October 26, 1979, during a dinner at the Korean Central Intelligence Agency (KCIA) safehouse inside the Blue House presidential compound in Gangjeong-dong, Seoul, South Korea.

Third Republic of Korea

South KoreaThird RepublicSouth Korea (Republic of Korea)
Park's coup brought an end to the interim government of the Second Republic and his election and inauguration in 1963 ushered in the Third Republic.
Park Chung-hee, the Chairman of the Supreme Council, was elected President of South Korea in the 1963 presidential election.

1971 South Korean presidential election

19711971 presidential electionPresidential election
Although popular during the 60s, by the 1970s, as growth began to slow, Park's popularity started to wane, resulting in a close victory during the 1971 South Korean presidential election.
The result was a victory for incumbent president and military dictator Park Chung-hee, who won 53.2% of the vote.

South Korea

Republic of KoreaKoreaKOR
Park Chung-hee (14 November 1917 – 26 October 1979) was a South Korean politician and general who served as the President of South Korea from 1963 until his assassination in 1979, assuming that office after first ruling the country as head of a military dictatorship installed by the May 16 military coup d'état in 1961.
This instability was broken by the May 16, 1961, coup led by General Park Chung-hee.

Second Republic of Korea

Second RepublicSecond Republic of South KoreaSouth Korea
Park's coup brought an end to the interim government of the Second Republic and his election and inauguration in 1963 ushered in the Third Republic.
The Second Republic's failure to improve South Korea's political and economic issues led to instability, and after thirteen months it was overthrown by the South Korean Army in the May 16 coup led by Park Chung-hee.

1963 South Korean presidential election

1963electionOctober 1963 presidential election
Park's coup brought an end to the interim government of the Second Republic and his election and inauguration in 1963 ushered in the Third Republic. In 1963, he was elected president in his own right as the candidate of the newly created Democratic Republican Party.
The result was a narrow victory for the acting incumbent and leader of the governing military Supreme Council for National Reconstruction, Park Chung Hee, who won 46.6% of the vote, securing a transition to civilian rule under his Democratic Republican Party.

Kim Jae-gyu

Kim Jae-kyuKim Jaegyufriend
Following the student uprising later known as the Bu-Ma Democratic Protests, Park was assassinated on 26 October 1979 by his close friend Kim Jae-gyu, the director of the Korean Central Intelligence Agency, at a safe house in Seoul.
He assassinated South Korean President Park Chung-hee—who had been one of his closest friends—on October 26, 1979, and was subsequently executed by hanging on May 24, 1980.

Supreme Council for National Reconstruction

Supreme Council of National Reconstructionmilitary junta1961–1963
Before his presidency, he was the chairman of the Supreme Council for National Reconstruction from 1961 to 1963 after a career as a military leader in the South Korean army.
Park Chung-hee served as Chairman of the Supreme Council from July 1961 until his victory in the 1963 South Korean presidential election, and the Supreme Council was dissolved upon the inauguration of the Third Republic of Korea in December 1963.

Park Geun-hye

Park Geun HyeParkGeun-hye Park
On 25 February 2013, his eldest daughter, Park Geun-hye, became the first female president of South Korea.
Her father, Park Chung-hee, was the President of South Korea from 1963 to 1979, serving five consecutive terms after he seized power in 1961.

Kim Dae-jung

Kim Dae JungPresident Kim Dae-jungKim Dae-jung administration
Later presidents included political activist Kim Dae-jung, who was arrested under Park's regime and later received a death-sentence which was quickly revoked, in part thanks to the urging of United States officials.
Although he was elected as a representative for the National Assembly in 1961, a military coup led by Park Chung-hee, who later assumed dictatorial powers, voided the elections.

Bu-Ma Democratic Protests

Bu-Ma Democratic Protest
Following the student uprising later known as the Bu-Ma Democratic Protests, Park was assassinated on 26 October 1979 by his close friend Kim Jae-gyu, the director of the Korean Central Intelligence Agency, at a safe house in Seoul.
President Park Chung-hee declared martial law on 18 October and referred 66 people to military court.

Choi Kyu-hah

Choi Kyu-haHong Gi Choi Kyu-hah
Kim and his many accomplices were captured, tortured, tried, convicted and executed as Choi Kyu-hah became Acting President pursuant to the Yushin Constitution's Article 48.
After the assassination of Park Chung-hee in 1979, Choi became acting president; the prime minister stood next in line for the presidency under Article 48 of the Yushin Constitution.

Chun Doo-hwan

Chun Doo HwanChunJeon Doo-Hwan
Major General Chun Doo-hwan quickly amassed sweeping powers after his Defense Security Command was charged with investigating the assassination, first taking control of the military and the KCIA before installing another military junta and finally assuming the presidency in 1980.
Chun, then a captain, led a demonstration at the KMA to show support for the May 16 coup led by Park Chung-hee.

Daegu

Daegu, South KoreaTaeguDaegu Metropolitan City
As a youth, he won admission to a teaching school in Daegu and worked as a teacher in Mungyeong-eup after graduating in high school, but was reportedly a very mediocre student.
The city was politically favored during the 18-year-long rule of Park Chung-hee, when it and the surrounding area served as his political base.

May 16 coup

coup d'étatA military coupcoup in May that year
While working in the Army as an unpaid civilian assistant, he came across the 8th class of the Korea Military Academy (graduated in 1950), among whom was Kim Jong-pil, and this particular class would later serve as the backbone of the May 16 coup. It led a military coup on 16 May 1961, which was nominally led by Army Chief of Staff Chang Do-yong after his defection on the day it started.
The May 16 military coup d'état was a military coup d'état in South Korea in 1961, organized and carried out by Park Chung-hee and his allies who formed the Military Revolutionary Committee, nominally led by Army Chief of Staff Chang Do-yong after the latter's acquiescence on the day of the coup.

Presidential Security Service

Secret Service
Cha Ji-chul, chief of the Presidential Security Service, was also fatally shot by Kim.
Its name soon changed in 1960 to the Blue House Presidential Police with a Security Force raised in 1961 to closely guard Park Chung Hee.

Miracle on the Han River

Miracle of the Han Rivereconomic developmentboost in the South Korean economy
Seeking to bring South Korea into the developed world, Park began a series of economic policies that brought rapid economic growth and industrialization to the nation that eventually became known as the Miracle on the Han River.
When a military coup in 1961 led by general Park Chung-hee overthrew the Democratic Party, the result was a military junta under the SCNR.

Gumi, North Gyeongsang

GumiGumi, Gyeongsangbuk-doGumi, South Korea
Park was born on 14 November 1917, in Gumi, North Gyeongsang in Korea under Japanese rule, to parents Park Sung-bin and Bek Nam-eui.
The former President of South Korea, Park Chung-hee, was born in the city.

Kim Jong-pil

Kim Jong PilJong-pilJongpil Kim
While working in the Army as an unpaid civilian assistant, he came across the 8th class of the Korea Military Academy (graduated in 1950), among whom was Kim Jong-pil, and this particular class would later serve as the backbone of the May 16 coup.
Kim Jong-pil (January 7, 1926 – June 23, 2018) was a South Korean politician and founder of the Korean Central Intelligence Agency (the KCIA, now the National Intelligence Service), who served as Prime Minister twice, from 1971–1975 during president Park Chung-hee (1961–1979) and from 1998–2000 during president Kim Dae-jung (1998–2002).

National Intelligence Service (South Korea)

National Intelligence ServiceKorean Central Intelligence AgencyKCIA
Following the student uprising later known as the Bu-Ma Democratic Protests, Park was assassinated on 26 October 1979 by his close friend Kim Jae-gyu, the director of the Korean Central Intelligence Agency, at a safe house in Seoul.
The agency was officially established in 1961 as the Korean Central Intelligence Agency (KCIA), during the rule of President Park Chung-hee's military Supreme Council for National Reconstruction, which displaced the Second Republic of Korea.

Korea under Japanese rule

KoreaJapanese KoreaJapanese occupation
Park was born on 14 November 1917, in Gumi, North Gyeongsang in Korea under Japanese rule, to parents Park Sung-bin and Bek Nam-eui.
Examples include Park Chung-hee, who became president of South Korea, Chung Il-kwon, prime minister from 1964 to 1970, and Paik Sun-yup, South Korea's youngest general, famous for his defense during the Battle of Pusan Perimeter during the Korean War.

1967 South Korean presidential election

19671967 presidential electionSouth Korean presidential election
Park would be re-elected president in 1967, defeating Yun with somewhat less difficulty.
The result was a victory for Park Chung-hee, who won 51.4% of the vote.

Chang Do-yong

Chang Do YungJang Do-young
It led a military coup on 16 May 1961, which was nominally led by Army Chief of Staff Chang Do-yong after his defection on the day it started.
Change first learned of the coup from Park Chung-hee on 10 April 1961, who wanted him to lead the new government so that the entire military would support it.

Chang Myon

John M. ChangJohn ChangJohn Myun Chang
Yun Bo-seon was a figurehead president, with the real power vested in Prime Minister Chang Myon.
Chang Myon's government ended when Park Chung-hee led a successful military coup on May 16, 1961, which marked the end of the Second Republic and the nation's brief experimentation with the cabinet form of government.

Democratic Republican Party (South Korea)

Democratic Republican PartyDemocratic RepublicanRepublican Party
In 1963, he was elected president in his own right as the candidate of the newly created Democratic Republican Party.
Under the control of Park Chung Hee, President of South Korea from his military coup d'état of 1961 until his assassination in 1979, the party oversaw a period of accelerated, state-directed industrialization and socio-economic modernization known as the "Miracle of the Han River", where a predominantly poor and agrarian country was transformed into an industrial "tiger economy".