Partition of Bengal (1947)

partition of BengalPartitionpartitionedPartition of Bengal in 1947Second Partition of Bengal1947 Bengal partition1947 Partition1947 Partition of BengalBangladeshBangladesh (British India)
The Partition of Bengal in 1947, part of the Partition of India, divided the British Indian province of Bengal based on the Radcliffe Line between India and Pakistan.wikipedia
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Bangladesh

People's Republic of BangladeshBangladeshiBangla Desh
Predominantly Hindu West Bengal became a state of India, and predominantly Muslim East Bengal (now Bangladesh) became a province of Pakistan.
The borders of modern Bangladesh were established with the separation of Bengal and India in August 1947, when the region became East Pakistan as a part of the newly formed State of Pakistan, demarcated by the Boundary of the Partition of India.

West Bengal

West Bengal, IndiaBengalWestern Bengal
Predominantly Hindu West Bengal became a state of India, and predominantly Muslim East Bengal (now Bangladesh) became a province of Pakistan.
In 1947, the Bengal Legislative Council and the Bengal Legislative Assembly voted on the Partition of Bengal along religious lines into two separate entities: West Bengal, a state of India, and East Bengal, a province of Pakistan which later became the independent Bangladesh.

East Bengal

Eastern BengalEastGovernment of East Bengal
Predominantly Hindu West Bengal became a state of India, and predominantly Muslim East Bengal (now Bangladesh) became a province of Pakistan.
The Partition of British India, which divided Bengal along religious lines, established the borders of Muslim majority East Bengal.

Bengal Legislative Assembly

On 20 June 1947, the Bengal Legislative Assembly meet to decide the future of the Bengal Presidency, on whether it would be a United Bengal within India or Pakistan; or be divided into East and West Bengal.
The assembly's lifespan covered the anti-feudal movement of the Krishak Praja Party, the period of World War II, the Lahore Resolution, the Quit India movement, suggestions for a United Bengal and the partition of Bengal and partition of British India.

Bengal Presidency

BengalBengal ProvincePresidency of Bengal
On 20 June 1947, the Bengal Legislative Assembly meet to decide the future of the Bengal Presidency, on whether it would be a United Bengal within India or Pakistan; or be divided into East and West Bengal.
The Partition of British India in 1947 resulted in Bengal's division on religious grounds, between the Indian state of West Bengal and the Pakistani province of East Bengal, which first became East Pakistan in 1955 under Pakistani rule and finally the nation of Bangladesh in 1971.

Huseyn Shaheed Suhrawardy

H. S. SuhrawardyHuseyn SuhrawardySuhrawardy
After it became apparent that the division of India on the basis of the Two-nation theory would almost certainly result in the partition of the Bengal province along religious lines, Bengal provincial Muslim League leader Suhrawardy came up with a new plan to create an independent Bengal state that would join neither Pakistan nor India and remain unpartitioned.
As the Partition of India loomed in 1947, Suhrawardy championed an alternative to the Partition of Bengal, the idea of an independent united Bengal not federated with either India or Pakistan.

United Bengal

united but independent BengalBengalnation-state of Bengal
On 20 June 1947, the Bengal Legislative Assembly meet to decide the future of the Bengal Presidency, on whether it would be a United Bengal within India or Pakistan; or be divided into East and West Bengal.
The proposal was floated as an secular alternative to the partition of Bengal on communal lines.

1950 East Pakistan riots

1950 Barisal Riots1950 East Pakistan genocidegenocide of 1950
In 1950 severe riots occurred in Barisal and other places in East Pakistan, causing a further exodus of Hindus.
The province of Bengal with a marginal Muslim majority was also partitioned with the Muslim majority East Bengal going to Pakistan and Hindu majority West Bengal going to India.

Partition of Bengal (1905)

Partition of Bengal1905 Partition of Bengalfirst partition of Bengal
In 1905, the first partition in Bengal was implemented as an administrative preference, making governing the two provinces, West and East Bengal, easier.
In 1947, Bengal was partitioned for the second time, solely on religious grounds, as part of the Partition of India following the formation of the nations India and Pakistan.

All-India Muslim League

Muslim LeagueAll India Muslim LeaguePresident
However, the plan directly ran counter to that of the Muslim League's, which demanded the creation of a separate Muslim homeland on the basis of the two-nation theory.
The Muslim League formed its government in East Bengal immediately after the partition of Bengal, with Nurul Amin becoming the first Chief Minister.

Bengal

Bengal regionBengal, IndiaBengali
Radcliffe's line split Bengal, which historically was always a single economic zone, single cultural and ethnic (Bengali-Hindu or Bengali-Muslim) zone, into two-halves.
The United Kingdom Cabinet Mission of 1946 split the region between India and Pakistan, an action popularly known as the partition of Bengal (1947).

History of Bengal

ancient BengalBengalBangla, Bengali: বাংলা/বঙ্গ
Radcliffe's line split Bengal, which historically was always a single economic zone, single cultural and ethnic (Bengali-Hindu or Bengali-Muslim) zone, into two-halves.
A hotbed of the Indian independence movement through the early 20th century, Bengal was divided during India's independence in 1947 along religious lines into two separate entities: West Bengal—a state of India—and East Bengal—a part of the newly created Dominion of Pakistan that later became the independent nation of Bangladesh in 1971.

Direct Action Day

Great Calcutta KillingsCalcutta riots1946 Calcutta riots
Muslim League's continuous propaganda on the two-nation theory for the previous six years combined with the marginalisation of Hindus in the Suhrawardy ministry and the vicious riots of 1946, which many Hindus believed was state sponsored, left little room for trust in Muslim League among Bengali Hindus. But in Bengal, violence was limited only to Kolkata and Noakhali.

Noakhali riots

Noakhali genocideNoakhaliNoakhali riot
But in Bengal, violence was limited only to Kolkata and Noakhali.

Port of Kolkata

Kolkata PortKolkata Port TrustPort of Calcutta
But now the Tea chests from Assam's gardens would have to be carried over a much longer distance to reach the Kolkata port.
After independence, the port's importance decreased because of factors including the Partition of Bengal (1947), reduction in size of the port hinterland, and economic stagnation in eastern India.

Siliguri Corridor

Chicken's Neckeastern bottleneck of India
By 1950, India reconnected Assam to the rest of the country's rail network by building a 229 km meter gauge rail link through the Siliguri Corridor.
The Siliguri Corridor was created in 1947 after the partition of Bengal.

Ritwik Ghatak

Bagalar Banga DarshanRitwik Kumar GhatakRitwik Ghatak-directed
This was followed by Ritwik Ghatak's trilogy, Meghe Dhaka Tara (Cloud-covered stars) (1960), Komal Gandhar (1961), and Subarnarekha (1962), all dealing with the aftermath of the partition.
He and his family moved to Berhampore, Murshidabad and then to Calcutta (now Kolkata) just before millions of other refugees from East Bengal began to flood into the city, fleeing the catastrophic Bengal famine of 1943 and the partition of Bengal in 1947.

Dhaka

DaccaDhaka, BangladeshDhaka City
Dhaka at that time was only a district headquarters.
With the Partition of British India in 1947, Dhaka became the capital of East Bengal (1947-1955) and East Pakistan (1955-1971).

Rajkahini

The film Rajkahini directed by Srijit Mukherji is also based on the theme of partition of Bengal 1947.
In August 1947, the British passed a bill regarding the partition of Bengal.

Meghe Dhaka Tara

The Cloud-Capped StarMegha Dhaka Tara
This was followed by Ritwik Ghatak's trilogy, Meghe Dhaka Tara (Cloud-covered stars) (1960), Komal Gandhar (1961), and Subarnarekha (1962), all dealing with the aftermath of the partition.
It was part of a trilogy consisting of Meghe Dhaka Tara (1960), Komal Gandhar (1961), and Subarnarekha (1962), all dealing with the aftermath of the Partition of Bengal during the Partition of India in 1947 and the refugees coping with it.

Nemai Ghosh (director)

Nemai GhoshNimai Ghosh
Chinnamul (The Uprooted) a 1950 Bengali film directed by Nemai Ghosh, first dealt with the theme of partition of Bengal.
In addition to photography, he directed the highly acclaimed and neo-realistic Chinnamul (1950), that dealt with partition of Bengal during the partition of India in 1947.

Chinnamul

Chinnamul (The Uprooted) a 1950 Bengali film directed by Nemai Ghosh, first dealt with the theme of partition of Bengal.
The story revolved around a group of farmers from East Pakistan (now Bangladesh) who were forced to migrate to Calcutta because of the partition of Bengal in 1947.

Komal Gandhar

This was followed by Ritwik Ghatak's trilogy, Meghe Dhaka Tara (Cloud-covered stars) (1960), Komal Gandhar (1961), and Subarnarekha (1962), all dealing with the aftermath of the partition.
Through the microcosmic perspectivising of a group of devoted and uncompromising IPTA workers, Ghatak with his signature style touches on varied issues of partition, idealism, corruption, the interdependence of art and life, the scope of art, and class-struggle.

British Raj

British IndiaIndiaBritish rule
The Partition of Bengal in 1947, part of the Partition of India, divided the British Indian province of Bengal based on the Radcliffe Line between India and Pakistan.