Passamaquoddy

Passamaquoddy peoplePassamaquoddy TribePassamaquoddy Tribe of MaineIndian Township Indian ReservationPassamaquaddyPassamaquoddiesPassamaquoddy IndiansPassamaquoddy NationPassamaquoddy Trust LandPeskotomuhkati (Passamaquoddy) Nation
The Passamaquoddy (Peskotomuhkati or Pestomuhkati in the Passamaquoddy language) are an American Indian/First Nations people who live in northeastern North America, primarily in Maine, United States, and New Brunswick, Canada.wikipedia
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New Brunswick

NBProvince of New BrunswickNew Brunswick, Canada
The Passamaquoddy (Peskotomuhkati or Pestomuhkati in the Passamaquoddy language) are an American Indian/First Nations people who live in northeastern North America, primarily in Maine, United States, and New Brunswick, Canada.
Being relatively close to Europe, New Brunswick was among the first places in North America to be explored and settled by Europeans, starting with the French in the early 1600s, who displaced the indigenous Mi'kmaq, Maliseet, and the Passamaquoddy peoples.

Maine

MEState of MaineMaine, United States
The Passamaquoddy (Peskotomuhkati or Pestomuhkati in the Passamaquoddy language) are an American Indian/First Nations people who live in northeastern North America, primarily in Maine, United States, and New Brunswick, Canada. The Passamaquoddy, along with the neighboring Penobscot, are given special political status in the U.S. state of Maine.
The original inhabitants of the territory that is now Maine were Algonquian-speaking Wabanaki peoples, including the Passamaquoddy, Maliseet, Penobscot, Androscoggin and Kennebec.

Wabanaki Confederacy

WabanakiWabenakiIndigenous peoples
Among the Algonquian-speaking tribes of the loose Wabanaki Confederacy, they occupied coastal regions along the Bay of Fundy, Passamaquoddy Bay, and Gulf of Maine, and along the St. Croix River and its tributaries.
The Wabanaki Confederacy (Wabenaki, Wobanaki, translated to "People of the Dawn" or "Easterner") are a First Nations and Native American confederation of five principal nations: the Mi'kmaq, Maliseet, Passamaquoddy, Abenaki, and Penobscot.

Passamaquoddy Indian Township Reservation

Indian Township ReservationIndian Township, MainePassamaquoddy Indian Township Reservation, Maine
After the United States achieved independence from Great Britain, these people were eventually officially limited to the current Indian Township Reservation, at 45.26583°N, -67.61194°W, in eastern Washington County, Maine.
Passamaquoddy Indian Township Reservation is one of two Indian reservations of the federally recognized Passamaquoddy tribe in Washington County, Maine, United States.

Passamaquoddy Pleasant Point Reservation

Pleasant PointPleasant Point ReservationPassamaquoddy
They also control the small Passamaquoddy Pleasant Point Reservation in eastern Washington County, which has 0.5 mi 2 (1.2 km 2 ), all land.
Passamaquoddy Pleasant Point Reservation, in Malecite-Passamaquoddy Sipayik, is one of two Indian reservations of the federally recognized Passamaquoddy tribe in Washington County, Maine, United States.

St. Andrews, New Brunswick

St. AndrewsSaint AndrewsSaint Andrews, New Brunswick
Some Passamaquoddy continue to seek the return of territory now within present-day St. Andrews, New Brunswick, which they claim as Qonasqamkuk, a Passamaquoddy ancestral capital and burial ground.
It is also known as "Qonasqamkuk" by the Peskotomuhkati (Passamaquoddy) Nation.

Malecite-Passamaquoddy language

Malecite-PassamaquoddyMaliseetMalecite
The Passamaquoddy (Peskotomuhkati or Pestomuhkati in the Passamaquoddy language) are an American Indian/First Nations people who live in northeastern North America, primarily in Maine, United States, and New Brunswick, Canada. About 500 people, most if not all over the age of 50, speak the Malecite-Passamaquoddy language, shared (other than minor differences in dialect) with the neighboring and related Maliseet people.
Malecite–Passamaquoddy (also known as Maliseet–Passamaquoddy) is an endangered Algonquian language spoken by the Maliseet and Passamaquoddy peoples along both sides of the border between Maine in the United States and New Brunswick, Canada.

Maliseet

WolastoqiyikMaleciteMaliseet people
About 500 people, most if not all over the age of 50, speak the Malecite-Passamaquoddy language, shared (other than minor differences in dialect) with the neighboring and related Maliseet people.
Their lands and resources are bounded on the east by the Mi'kmaw people, on the west by the Penobscot people, and on the south by the Passamaquoddy people, who also still speak related Algonquian languages.

Saint Croix Island, Maine

Saint Croix IslandSt. Croix IslandÎle Sainte-Croix
In 2004, Chief Akagi was authorized to represent the Passamaquoddy at events marking the 400th anniversary of French settlement of St Croix Island (the first French effort at permanent settlement in the New World).
The island is in the heart of the traditional lands of the Passamaquoddy people who, according to oral tradition, used it to store food away from the dangers of mainland animals.

Maine House of Representatives

House of RepresentativesState RepresentativeMaine State Representative
Both groups are allowed to send a nonvoting representative to the Maine House of Representatives.
The three nonvoting members within the House represent the Penobscot Nation, the Passamaquoddy Tribe and the Maliseet Tribe.

Penobscot

Penobscot NationPenobscot peoplePenobscot Indian Nation
The Passamaquoddy, along with the neighboring Penobscot, are given special political status in the U.S. state of Maine.
They are part of the Wabanaki Confederacy, along with the Abenaki, Passamaquoddy, Maliseet, and Mi'kmaq nations, all of whom historically spoke Algonquian languages.

Francis Joseph Neptune

Concouguash, christian name Francis Joseph Neptune, (1735–1834) was chief of the Passamaquoddy tribe during the American Revolutionary War.

Geo Soctomah Neptune

Geo Neptune
Geo Soctomah Neptune is a Passamaquoddy Two-Spirit, master basket maker, activist, storyteller, model, and educator from Indian Township, Maine.

Joint Tribal Council of the Passamaquoddy Tribe v. Morton

Maine Indian Claims Settlement Act1980 Maine Indian land claim settlementMaine Indian Claims Settlement Act of 1980
* Joint Tribal Council of the Passamaquoddy Tribe v. Morton (1st Cir.
The United States Court of Appeals for the First Circuit held that the Nonintercourse Act applied to the Passamaquoddy and Penobscot, non-federally-recognized Indian tribes, and established a trust relationship between those tribes and the federal government that the state of Maine could not terminate.

Rena Newell

Rena D. Newell is a Passamaquoddy politician who serves as a non-voting member of the Maine House of Representatives.

Donald Soctomah

He serves as the tribal historic preservation officer for the Passamaquoddy tribe, where he works with both the U.S. and Canadian governments on the protection of culturally significant sites, artifacts and knowledge.

Madonna Soctomah

Madonna M. Soctomah is a Passamaquoddy politician from Maine.

Jesse Walter Fewkes

J. Walter FewkesFewkesDr. J. Walter Fewkes
He tested its use among the Passamaquoddy in Maine, before traveling to the Southwest to make his recordings of the Zuni (1890) and Hopi (1891).

Native Americans in the United States

Native AmericanNative AmericansAmerican Indian
The Passamaquoddy (Peskotomuhkati or Pestomuhkati in the Passamaquoddy language) are an American Indian/First Nations people who live in northeastern North America, primarily in Maine, United States, and New Brunswick, Canada.

Prenoun

The name "Passamaquoddy" is an anglicization of the Passamaquoddy word peskotomuhkati, the prenoun form (prenouns being a linguistic feature of Algonquian languages) of Peskotomuhkat (pestəmohkat), their autonym or name they used for themselves.

Algonquian languages

AlgonquianAlgonquian languageAlgonquin
Among the Algonquian-speaking tribes of the loose Wabanaki Confederacy, they occupied coastal regions along the Bay of Fundy, Passamaquoddy Bay, and Gulf of Maine, and along the St. Croix River and its tributaries. The name "Passamaquoddy" is an anglicization of the Passamaquoddy word peskotomuhkati, the prenoun form (prenouns being a linguistic feature of Algonquian languages) of Peskotomuhkat (pestəmohkat), their autonym or name they used for themselves.

Pollock

pollackPollachiusAlaskan pollock
Peskotomuhkat literally means "pollock-spearer" or "those of the place where pollock are plentiful", reflecting the importance of this fish in their culture.

Fishing

fishfishermenfished
Their method of fishing was spear-fishing rather than angling or using nets.

Passamaquoddy Bay

PassamaquoddyPassamaquaddy BayPassamaquoddy Bay tidal power
Among the Algonquian-speaking tribes of the loose Wabanaki Confederacy, they occupied coastal regions along the Bay of Fundy, Passamaquoddy Bay, and Gulf of Maine, and along the St. Croix River and its tributaries. Passamaquoddy Bay is shared by both New Brunswick and Maine; its name was derived by English settlers from the Passamaquoddy people.