Passerine

Passeriformespasserinesperching birdpasserine birdpasserine birdspasseriformsongbirdperching birdssongbirdsPasserides
A passerine is any bird of the order Passeriformes, which includes more than half of all bird species.wikipedia
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Bird

birdsAvesavian
A passerine is any bird of the order Passeriformes, which includes more than half of all bird species.
They rank as the world's most numerically successful class of tetrapods, with approximately ten thousand living species, more than half of these being passerine, or "perching" birds.

Songbird

songbirdssong birdoscine
Sometimes known as perching birds or – less accurately – as songbirds, passerines are distinguished from other orders of birds by the arrangement of their toes (three pointing forward and one back), which facilitates perching, amongst other features specific to their evolutionary history in Australaves. Passerines are divided into three suborders: Acanthisitti (New Zealand wrens), Tyranni (suboscines) and Passeri (oscines).
A songbird is a bird belonging to the clade Passeri of the perching birds (Passeriformes).

Cuckoo-finch

Parasitic weaverAnomalospizaAnomalospiza imberbis
The passerines contain several groups of brood parasites such as the viduas, cuckoo-finches, and the cowbirds.
The cuckoo-finch (Anomalospiza imberbis), also known as the parasitic weaver or cuckoo weaver, is a small passerine bird now placed in the family Viduidae with the indigobirds and whydahs.

Tyranni

suboscinesub-oscinesuboscines
Passerines are divided into three suborders: Acanthisitti (New Zealand wrens), Tyranni (suboscines) and Passeri (oscines).
The Tyranni (suboscines) are a clade of passerine birds that includes more than 1,000 species, the large majority of which are South American.

Viduidae

indigobirdwhydahsindigo bird
The passerines contain several groups of brood parasites such as the viduas, cuckoo-finches, and the cowbirds.
The indigobirds and whydahs, together with the Cuckoo-finch make up the family Viduidae; they are small passerine birds native to Africa.

Common raven

ravenCorvus coraxravens
The heaviest and altogether largest passerines are the thick-billed raven and the larger races of common raven, each exceeding 1.5 kg and 70 cm.
The common raven (Corvus corax), also known as the northern raven, is a large all-black passerine bird.

Bird vocalization

songcallcalls
Oscines have the best control of their syrinx muscles among birds, producing a wide range of songs and other vocalizations (though some of them, such as the crows, do not sound musical to human beings); some such as the lyrebird are accomplished imitators.
Bird song is best developed in the order Passeriformes.

Des Murs's wiretail

SylviorthorhynchusSylviorthorhynchus desmursii
Most passerine birds have 12 tail feathers but the superb lyrebird has 16, and several spinetails in the family Furnariidae have 10, 8, or even 6, as is the case of Des Murs's wiretail.
Des Murs's wiretail (Sylviorthorhynchus desmursii) is a small passerine bird of southern South America which belongs to the ovenbird family Furnariidae.

Woodcreeper

DendrocolaptinaeDendrocolaptidae
Species adapted to tree trunk climbing such as woodcreeper and treecreepers have stiff tail feathers that are used as props during climbing.
The woodcreepers (Dendrocolaptinae) comprise a subfamily of suboscine passerine birds endemic to the Neotropics.

Australaves

australavians
Sometimes known as perching birds or – less accurately – as songbirds, passerines are distinguished from other orders of birds by the arrangement of their toes (three pointing forward and one back), which facilitates perching, amongst other features specific to their evolutionary history in Australaves.
Australaves is a recently defined clade of birds, consisting of the Eufalconimorphae (passerines, parrots and falcons) as well as the Cariamiformes (including seriemas and the extinct "terror birds").

Superb lyrebird

Menura novaehollandiaelyrebirdlyrebirds
Most passerine birds have 12 tail feathers but the superb lyrebird has 16, and several spinetails in the family Furnariidae have 10, 8, or even 6, as is the case of Des Murs's wiretail. The superb lyrebird and some birds-of-paradise, due to very long tails or tail coverts, are longer overall.
Superb lyrebirds are passerine birds within the Menuridae family, being one of the two species of lyrebirds forming the genus Menura, with the other being the much rarer Albert's lyrebird.

Short-tailed pygmy tyrant

Short-tailed pygmy-tyrantMyiornis ecaudatus
The smallest passerine is the short-tailed pygmy tyrant, at 6.5 cm and 4.2 g.
The species is one of the smallest birds on Earth and the smallest passerine.

New Zealand wren

AcanthisittidaeAcanthisittiacanthisittids
Passerines are divided into three suborders: Acanthisitti (New Zealand wrens), Tyranni (suboscines) and Passeri (oscines). For example, the wrens of the Americas and Eurasia; those of Australia; and those of New Zealand look superficially similar and behave in similar ways, and yet belong to three far-flung branches of the passerine family tree; they are as unrelated as it is possible to be while remaining Passeriformes.
The New Zealand wrens are a family (Acanthisittidae) of tiny passerines endemic to New Zealand.

Thick-billed raven

Corvus crassirostris
The heaviest and altogether largest passerines are the thick-billed raven and the larger races of common raven, each exceeding 1.5 kg and 70 cm.
The thick-billed raven (Corvus crassirostris), a corvid from the Horn of Africa, shares with the common raven the distinction of being the largest bird in the corvid family, and indeed the largest of the most diverse bird order with well over 5,000 identified species, the passerines.

Australasian wren

Maluridaefairy-wrensfairy-wren
For example, the wrens of the Americas and Eurasia; those of Australia; and those of New Zealand look superficially similar and behave in similar ways, and yet belong to three far-flung branches of the passerine family tree; they are as unrelated as it is possible to be while remaining Passeriformes.
The Australasian wrens are a family, Maluridae, of small, insectivorous passerine birds endemic to Australia and New Guinea.

Tui (bird)

tuitūīProsthemadera
From the Bathans Formation at the Manuherikia River in Otago, New Zealand, MNZ S42815 (a distal right tarsometatarsus of a tui-sized bird) and several bones of at least one species of saddleback-sized bird have recently been described.
The tui (tūī; Prosthemadera novaeseelandiae) is an endemic passerine bird of New Zealand, and the only species in the genus Prosthemadera.

Eurylaimidae

broadbillsBroadbill
That suboscines expanded much beyond their region of origin is proven by several fossil from Germany such as a broadbill (Eurylaimidae) humerus fragment from the Early Miocene (roughly 20 mya) of Wintershof, Germany, the Late Oligocene carpometacarpus from France listed above, and Wieslochia, among others.
The Eurylaimidae are a family of passerine birds that occur from the eastern Himalayas to Indonesia and the Philippines.

Wieslochia

That suboscines expanded much beyond their region of origin is proven by several fossil from Germany such as a broadbill (Eurylaimidae) humerus fragment from the Early Miocene (roughly 20 mya) of Wintershof, Germany, the Late Oligocene carpometacarpus from France listed above, and Wieslochia, among others. Several more recent fossils from the Oligocene of Europe, such as Wieslochia, Jamna, and Resoviaornis, are more complete and definitely represent early passeriforms, although their exact position in the evolutionary tree is not known.
Wieslochia weissi is an extinct species of passerine bird from the early Oligocene (27.8 - 33.9 Ma) of Germany.

Sylvioidea

The Passeri has been traditionally subdivided into two major groups recognized now as Corvida and Passerida respectively containing the large superfamilies Corvoidea and Meliphagoidea, as well as minor lineages, and the superfamilies Sylvioidea, Muscicapoidea, and Passeroidea but this arrangement has been found to be oversimplified.
Sylvioidea is a superfamily of passerine birds, one of at least three major clades within the Passerida along with the Muscicapoidea and Passeroidea.

Sylviidae

Old World warblersSylvidae
Sylviidae is a family of passerine birds that includes the typical warblers, parrotbills, the wrentit, and a number of babblers formerly placed within the Old World babbler family.

Altriciality

altricialsemi-altricialaltricially
The chicks of passerines are altricial: blind, featherless, and helpless when hatched from their eggs.
Among birds, these include herons, hawks, woodpeckers, owls, cuckoos and most passerines.

Corvoidea

corvoid
The Passeri has been traditionally subdivided into two major groups recognized now as Corvida and Passerida respectively containing the large superfamilies Corvoidea and Meliphagoidea, as well as minor lineages, and the superfamilies Sylvioidea, Muscicapoidea, and Passeroidea but this arrangement has been found to be oversimplified.

Saddleback (bird)

saddlebacktieketieke (saddleback)
From the Bathans Formation at the Manuherikia River in Otago, New Zealand, MNZ S42815 (a distal right tarsometatarsus of a tui-sized bird) and several bones of at least one species of saddleback-sized bird have recently been described.
The saddlebacks appear to be a remnant of an early expansion of passerines in New Zealand and are two of five New Zealand wattlebirds of the family Callaeidae, the others being the extinct huia, the endangered North Island kōkako, and the probably extinct South Island kōkako.

Resoviaornis

Resoviaornis jamrozi
Several more recent fossils from the Oligocene of Europe, such as Wieslochia, Jamna, and Resoviaornis, are more complete and definitely represent early passeriforms, although their exact position in the evolutionary tree is not known.
Resoviaornis is an extinct genus of passerine bird from the Early Oligocene (28.5-29 Ma) of southern Poland.

Meliphagoidea

The Passeri has been traditionally subdivided into two major groups recognized now as Corvida and Passerida respectively containing the large superfamilies Corvoidea and Meliphagoidea, as well as minor lineages, and the superfamilies Sylvioidea, Muscicapoidea, and Passeroidea but this arrangement has been found to be oversimplified.
Meliphagoidea is a superfamily of passerine birds.