Passion of Jesus

PassionPassion of Christthe PassionChrist's PassionPassion of Jesus ChristPassion (Christianity)Passion of the ChristPassionscrucifixionPassion music
In Christianity, the Passion (from the Latin verb: patior, passus sum ("to suffer, bear, endure", from which also "patience, patient", etc.) is the short final period in the life of Jesus.wikipedia
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Christianity

ChristianChristiansChristian faith
In Christianity, the Passion (from the Latin verb: patior, passus sum ("to suffer, bear, endure", from which also "patience, patient", etc.) is the short final period in the life of Jesus.
Their creeds generally hold in common Jesus as the Son of God—the logos incarnated—who ministred, suffered, and died on a cross, but rose from the dead for the salvation of mankind; as referred to as the gospel, meaning the "good news", in the Bible (scripture).

Triumphal entry into Jerusalem

Entry into JerusalemChrist's entry into JerusalemEntry of Christ into Jerusalem
Depending on one's views, the 'Passion' may include, among other events, Jesus' triumphal entry into Jerusalem, his cleansing of the Temple, his anointing, the Last Supper, Jesus' agony in the Garden, his arrest, his Sanhedrin trial, his trial before Pontius Pilate, his crucifixion and his death on Good Friday, his burial, and the alleged resurrection of Jesus.
In the accounts of the four canonical Gospels, Jesus' triumphal entry takes place in the days before the Last Supper, marking the beginning of his Passion.

Crucifixion of Jesus

CrucifixiondeathCrucifixion of Christ
Depending on one's views, the 'Passion' may include, among other events, Jesus' triumphal entry into Jerusalem, his cleansing of the Temple, his anointing, the Last Supper, Jesus' agony in the Garden, his arrest, his Sanhedrin trial, his trial before Pontius Pilate, his crucifixion and his death on Good Friday, his burial, and the alleged resurrection of Jesus. The Stations of the Cross are a series of religious reflections describing or depicting, Christ Carrying the Cross to his crucifixion.
Collectively referred to as the Passion, Jesus' suffering and redemptive death by crucifixion are the central aspects of Christian theology concerning the doctrines of salvation and atonement.

Jesus

Jesus ChristChristJesus of Nazareth
In Christianity, the Passion (from the Latin verb: patior, passus sum ("to suffer, bear, endure", from which also "patience, patient", etc.) is the short final period in the life of Jesus.
In this respect, it is noteworthy that the Gospels devote about one third of their text to the last week of the life of Jesus in Jerusalem, referred to as the Passion.

Good Friday

Great FridayHoly FridayGreat and Holy Friday
Depending on one's views, the 'Passion' may include, among other events, Jesus' triumphal entry into Jerusalem, his cleansing of the Temple, his anointing, the Last Supper, Jesus' agony in the Garden, his arrest, his Sanhedrin trial, his trial before Pontius Pilate, his crucifixion and his death on Good Friday, his burial, and the alleged resurrection of Jesus. Most Christian denominations will read one or more narratives of the Passion during Holy Week, especially on Good Friday.
Scattered throughout this Matins service are twelve readings from all four of the Gospels which recount the events of the Passion from the Last Supper through the Crucifixion and burial of Jesus.

Gospel of Luke

LukeLuke's GospelBook of Luke
Accounts of the Passion are found in the four canonical gospels, Matthew, Mark, Luke and John.
It divides the history of first-century Christianity into three stages, with the gospel making up the first two of these – the arrival among men of Jesus the Messiah, from his birth to the beginning of his earthly mission in the meeting with John the Baptist followed by his earthly ministry, Passion, death, and resurrection (concluding the gospel story per se).

Stations of the Cross

Via CrucisWay of the CrossStation of the Cross
In the Roman Catholic Church (and some Anglo-Catholic and Western Rite Orthodox churches), the Passion story is depicted in the Stations of the Cross (via crucis, also translated more literally as "Way of the Cross").
The object of the stations is to help the Christian faithful to make a spiritual pilgrimage through contemplation of the Passion of Christ.

Mocking of Jesus

Mocking of Christmockedmock
Herod then mocks him and sends him back to Pilate after giving him an "elegant" robe to wear.
It is considered part of Jesus' passion.

Friday of Sorrows

Friday of Sorrows (Friday before Palm Sunday)
In some Christian communities, commemoration of the Passion also includes remembrance of the sorrow of Mary, the mother of Jesus, on the Friday of Sorrows.
It takes place exactly one week before Good Friday, and concentrates on the emotional pain that the Passion of Jesus Christ caused to his mother, the Blessed Virgin Mary, who is venerated under the title Our Lady of Sorrows.

Flagellation of Christ

FlagellationScourging at the Pillarflogged
Once condemned by Pilate, he was flogged before execution.
The Flagellation of Christ, sometimes known as Christ at the Column or the Scourging at the Pillar, is a scene from the Passion of Christ very frequently shown in Christian art, in cycles of the Passion or the larger subject of the Life of Christ.

Arrest of Jesus

arrestArrest of Christarrested
Depending on one's views, the 'Passion' may include, among other events, Jesus' triumphal entry into Jerusalem, his cleansing of the Temple, his anointing, the Last Supper, Jesus' agony in the Garden, his arrest, his Sanhedrin trial, his trial before Pontius Pilate, his crucifixion and his death on Good Friday, his burial, and the alleged resurrection of Jesus.
In Christian theology, the events from the Last Supper until the crucifixion and resurrection of Jesus are referred to as the Passion.

Gospel of Mark

MarkMark's GospelGospel according to Mark
Accounts of the Passion are found in the four canonical gospels, Matthew, Mark, Luke and John.
More fundamentally, some scholars believe Mark's reason for writing was to counter believers who saw Jesus in a Greek way, as wonder-worker (the Greek term is "divine man"); Mark saw the suffering of the messiah as essential, so that the "Son of God" title (the Hellenistic "divine man") had to be corrected and amplified with the "Son of Man" title, which conveyed Christ's suffering.

Descent from the Cross

Deposition of ChristDepositionDeposition from the Cross
Sometimes there will be a reenactment of the Descent from the Cross; for instance, at Vespers in the Byzantine (Eastern Orthodox and Greek-Catholic) tradition.
The scene was usually included in medieval cycles of the Life or the Passion of Christ, between the Crucifixion and the Entombment of Christ.

Ecce homo

Behold the ManBehold the BridegroomEcce homo'' in Eastern Orthodoxy
According to the Gospel of John, Pilate has Jesus brought out a second time, wearing the purple robe and the crown of thorns, in order to appeal his innocence before the crowd, saying Ecce homo, ("Behold the man").
A scene of the Ecce Homo is a standard component of cycles illustrating the Passion and Life of Christ in art.

Jesus, King of the Jews

INRIKing of the JewsI.N.R.I.
In all the Gospels, Pilate asks Jesus if he is King of the Jews and Jesus replies "So you say".
Towards the end of the accounts of all four canonical Gospels, in the narrative of the Passion of Jesus, the title "King of the Judeans" leads to charges against Jesus that result in his crucifixion.

Gospel of Peter

Peterof PeterPeter's Gospel
Another passion narrative is found in the fragmentary Gospel of Peter, long known to scholars through references, and of which a fragment was discovered in Cairo in 1884.
A major focus of the surviving fragment of the Gospel of Peter is the passion narrative, which ascribes responsibility for the crucifixion of Jesus to Herod Antipas rather than to Pontius Pilate.

Church of the Holy Sepulchre

Holy SepulchreChurch of the Holy Sepulchertomb
In the Eastern Orthodox and Greek-Catholic Churches, the Matins service for Good Friday is called Matins of the Twelve Passion Gospels, and is remarkable for the interspersing of twelve readings from the Gospel Book detailing chronologically the events of the Passion—from the Last Supper to the burial in the tomb—during the course of the service.
Within the church proper are the last four (or, by some definitions, five) stations of the Via Dolorosa, representing the final episodes of the Passion of Jesus.

Holy Week

Passion WeekSemana Santalast week of the life of Jesus in Jerusalem
Most Christian denominations will read one or more narratives of the Passion during Holy Week, especially on Good Friday.
The Mass or service of worship itself includes a reading of the Passion, the narrative of Jesus' capture, sufferings and death, as recounted in one of the Synoptic Gospels.

Resurrection of Jesus

resurrectionResurrection of Christresurrection of Jesus Christ
Depending on one's views, the 'Passion' may include, among other events, Jesus' triumphal entry into Jerusalem, his cleansing of the Temple, his anointing, the Last Supper, Jesus' agony in the Garden, his arrest, his Sanhedrin trial, his trial before Pontius Pilate, his crucifixion and his death on Good Friday, his burial, and the alleged resurrection of Jesus.
Easter is linked to the Passover and Exodus from Egypt recorded in the Old Testament through the Last Supper and crucifixion that preceded the resurrection.

Christ Carrying the Cross

Carrying of the Crosscarrying his crossWay to Calvary
The Stations of the Cross are a series of religious reflections describing or depicting, Christ Carrying the Cross to his crucifixion.
However, the subject occurs in many other contexts, including single works and cycles of the Life of Christ or the Passion of Christ.

Judas Iscariot

JudasIscariotJudases
Judas is given some role in virtually all literature telling the Passion story, and appears in numerous modern novels and movies.

Eastern Orthodox Church

Eastern OrthodoxOrthodoxOrthodox Church
Protestant Christians place it in the Apocrypha, Roman Catholics and Eastern Orthodox among the deuterocanonical books.
In the liturgical commemorations of the Passion of Christ during Holy Week there are frequent allusions to the ultimate victory at its completion.

Life of Christ in art

Life of ChristLife of Christ'' in artLife of Jesus Christ
For a full list of the subjects forming narrative works of art on the Passion, or episodes from it, see Life of Christ in art.
The most common subjects were grouped around the birth and childhood of Jesus, and the Passion of Christ, leading to his Crucifixion and Resurrection.

Francis of Assisi

St. FrancisSaint FrancisSaint Francis of Assisi
The tradition of moving around the Stations to commemorate the Passion of Christ began with Francis of Assisi and extended throughout the Roman Catholic Church in the medieval period.
According to Christian tradition, in 1224 he received the stigmata during the apparition of Seraphic angels in a religious ecstasy, which would make him the second person in Christian tradition after St. Paul (Galatians 6:17) to bear the wounds of Christ's Passion.

Acts of Reparation to Jesus Christ

Act of Reparation to Jesus ChristAct of ReparationActs of Reparation
These Acts of Reparation to Jesus Christ do not involve a petition for a living or deceased beneficiary, but aim to repair the sins against Jesus.
These include the sufferings during the Passion of Jesus.