Pat Dobson

Dobson
Patrick Edward Dobson, Jr. (February 12, 1942 – November 22, 2006) was an American right-handed starting pitcher in Major League Baseball who played for the Detroit Tigers (1967–69), San Diego Padres (1970), Baltimore Orioles (1971–72), Atlanta Braves (1973), New York Yankees (1973–75) and Cleveland Indians (1976–77).wikipedia
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Baltimore Orioles

OriolesBaltimoreSt. Louis Browns
Patrick Edward Dobson, Jr. (February 12, 1942 – November 22, 2006) was an American right-handed starting pitcher in Major League Baseball who played for the Detroit Tigers (1967–69), San Diego Padres (1970), Baltimore Orioles (1971–72), Atlanta Braves (1973), New York Yankees (1973–75) and Cleveland Indians (1976–77).
In 1971, the Orioles won another division title thanks to four 20-game winners on their pitching staff (Cuellar, Jim Palmer, Pat Dobson, and Dave McNally).

Joe Niekro

NiekroJ. NiekroJoe
Unable to claim a spot in the Tigers' rotation of Mickey Lolich, Denny McLain, Earl Wilson, and Joe Sparma, Dobson was traded to San Diego in along with Dave Campbell for a young Joe Niekro.
He was traded by the Padres on December 4 to the Detroit Tigers for Dave Campbell and Pat Dobson.

Dave McNally

McNallya baseball star
Dobson posted a 20–8, 187, 2.90 season record, and was part of the Orioles' "Big Four" pitching staff along with Dave McNally (21–5), Mike Cuellar (20–9), and Jim Palmer (20–10).
McNally won more than 20 games for four consecutive seasons (1968–1971) and was one of four 20-game winners for the 1971 Orioles (Pat Dobson, Jim Palmer, and Mike Cuellar were the other three).

Fort Myers Sun Sox

From 1989 to 1990, he was the manager of the Fort Myers Sun Sox of the Senior Professional Baseball Association, leading the team to a 37–35 record and a playoff berth in his first season and an 11–14 record at the time of the league's demise on December 26, 1990.
The club was managed by Pat Dobson, while Joe Coleman, Dyar Miller, Jerry Terrell and Tony Torchia served as coaches.

Jim Palmer

PalmerJames Alvin Palmer
Dobson posted a 20–8, 187, 2.90 season record, and was part of the Orioles' "Big Four" pitching staff along with Dave McNally (21–5), Mike Cuellar (20–9), and Jim Palmer (20–10).
In, Cuellar went 24–8, McNally 24–9, Palmer 20–10; in the trio went 20–9, 21–5 and 20–9, respectively, with Pat Dobson going 20–8.

Davey Johnson

Davey Johnson (M)Johnson
On November 30, 1972, he was traded to the Braves along with Davey Johnson in a five-player trade for Earl Williams.
Following the 1972 season, one in which Johnson would hit only .221 in 118 games, he was traded along with starting pitchers Pat Dobson and Roric Harrison, and catcher Johnny Oates to the Atlanta Braves for minor league infielder Taylor Duncan and former National League Rookie of the Year catcher Earl Williams.

1968 Detroit Tigers season

Detroit Tigers19681968 Detroit Tigers
* 1968 Detroit Tigers season
The Tigers bullpen in 1968 included Pat Dobson, Daryl Patterson, Fred Lasher, and John Hiller (who also made 12 starts during the season).

Mike Cuellar

CuellarMike Cuéllar
Dobson posted a 20–8, 187, 2.90 season record, and was part of the Orioles' "Big Four" pitching staff along with Dave McNally (21–5), Mike Cuellar (20–9), and Jim Palmer (20–10).
In 1971, Pat Dobson joined the Orioles, and he posted a 20–8 record as a starting pitcher, forming the Orioles' one-year-only "Big Four" of 20-game winners.

Earl Williams (1970s catcher)

Earl WilliamsEarl Williams (1970s C)Earl Williams (C/1B)
On November 30, 1972, he was traded to the Braves along with Davey Johnson in a five-player trade for Earl Williams.
Following the season, he and infield prospect Taylor Duncan were traded to the Baltimore Orioles for Pat Dobson, Roric Harrison, Davey Johnson and Johnny Oates.

Starting pitcher

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Patrick Edward Dobson, Jr. (February 12, 1942 – November 22, 2006) was an American right-handed starting pitcher in Major League Baseball who played for the Detroit Tigers (1967–69), San Diego Padres (1970), Baltimore Orioles (1971–72), Atlanta Braves (1973), New York Yankees (1973–75) and Cleveland Indians (1976–77).

Major League Baseball

MLBMajor LeagueMajor Leagues
Patrick Edward Dobson, Jr. (February 12, 1942 – November 22, 2006) was an American right-handed starting pitcher in Major League Baseball who played for the Detroit Tigers (1967–69), San Diego Padres (1970), Baltimore Orioles (1971–72), Atlanta Braves (1973), New York Yankees (1973–75) and Cleveland Indians (1976–77).

Detroit Tigers

TigersDetroitDET
Patrick Edward Dobson, Jr. (February 12, 1942 – November 22, 2006) was an American right-handed starting pitcher in Major League Baseball who played for the Detroit Tigers (1967–69), San Diego Padres (1970), Baltimore Orioles (1971–72), Atlanta Braves (1973), New York Yankees (1973–75) and Cleveland Indians (1976–77).

San Diego Padres

PadresSan DiegoSD
Patrick Edward Dobson, Jr. (February 12, 1942 – November 22, 2006) was an American right-handed starting pitcher in Major League Baseball who played for the Detroit Tigers (1967–69), San Diego Padres (1970), Baltimore Orioles (1971–72), Atlanta Braves (1973), New York Yankees (1973–75) and Cleveland Indians (1976–77).

Atlanta Braves

Milwaukee BravesBravesAtlanta
Patrick Edward Dobson, Jr. (February 12, 1942 – November 22, 2006) was an American right-handed starting pitcher in Major League Baseball who played for the Detroit Tigers (1967–69), San Diego Padres (1970), Baltimore Orioles (1971–72), Atlanta Braves (1973), New York Yankees (1973–75) and Cleveland Indians (1976–77).

New York Yankees

YankeesNew York HighlandersNew York Yankee
Patrick Edward Dobson, Jr. (February 12, 1942 – November 22, 2006) was an American right-handed starting pitcher in Major League Baseball who played for the Detroit Tigers (1967–69), San Diego Padres (1970), Baltimore Orioles (1971–72), Atlanta Braves (1973), New York Yankees (1973–75) and Cleveland Indians (1976–77).

Cleveland Indians

Cleveland NapsIndiansCleveland
Patrick Edward Dobson, Jr. (February 12, 1942 – November 22, 2006) was an American right-handed starting pitcher in Major League Baseball who played for the Detroit Tigers (1967–69), San Diego Padres (1970), Baltimore Orioles (1971–72), Atlanta Braves (1973), New York Yankees (1973–75) and Cleveland Indians (1976–77).

Minor League Baseball

minor leagueClass AClass A-Advanced
After spending seven years in the minor leagues and winter ball, pitching both in relief and starting, he made his debut with the big team in the season after starting the season 4–1 with a 1.47 ERA in six starts for the AAA Toledo Mud Hens.

Relief pitcher

reliefrelieverrelieved
After spending seven years in the minor leagues and winter ball, pitching both in relief and starting, he made his debut with the big team in the season after starting the season 4–1 with a 1.47 ERA in six starts for the AAA Toledo Mud Hens.

Toledo Mud Hens

ToledoMud HensToledo Iron Men
After spending seven years in the minor leagues and winter ball, pitching both in relief and starting, he made his debut with the big team in the season after starting the season 4–1 with a 1.47 ERA in six starts for the AAA Toledo Mud Hens.

St. Louis Cardinals

St. Louis BrownsCardinalsSt. Louis
Dobson would spend the next 2 1/2 years as a reliever and spot starter for the Tigers including pitching 4 2/3 innings of relief in the team's 1968 World Series victory over the St. Louis Cardinals.

Mickey Lolich

Lolich
Unable to claim a spot in the Tigers' rotation of Mickey Lolich, Denny McLain, Earl Wilson, and Joe Sparma, Dobson was traded to San Diego in along with Dave Campbell for a young Joe Niekro.

Denny McLain

McLain
Unable to claim a spot in the Tigers' rotation of Mickey Lolich, Denny McLain, Earl Wilson, and Joe Sparma, Dobson was traded to San Diego in along with Dave Campbell for a young Joe Niekro.

Earl Wilson (baseball)

Earl WilsonEarl Wilson (pitcher)Wilson
Unable to claim a spot in the Tigers' rotation of Mickey Lolich, Denny McLain, Earl Wilson, and Joe Sparma, Dobson was traded to San Diego in along with Dave Campbell for a young Joe Niekro.