Pat Summerall

2017 Pat Summerall AwardG. A. "Pat" SummerallGeorge "Pat" SummerallSummerall ReportSummerall, Pat
George Allen "Pat" Summerall (May 10, 1930 – April 16, 2013) was an American football player and television sportscaster, having worked at CBS, Fox, and ESPN.wikipedia
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Fox Sports (United States)

Fox SportsFoxsports
George Allen "Pat" Summerall (May 10, 1930 – April 16, 2013) was an American football player and television sportscaster, having worked at CBS, Fox, and ESPN.
Fox also lured commentators Pat Summerall, John Madden, Dick Stockton, Matt Millen, James Brown and Terry Bradshaw as well as many behind-the-scenes production personnel from CBS Sports to staff the network's NFL coverage.

Tom Brookshier

He worked with Tom Brookshier and then John Madden on NFL telecasts for CBS and Fox. The network's #1 NFL crew now consisted of Summerall and analyst Tom Brookshier (with whom he had previously worked on This Week in Pro Football), and the colorful Summerall-Brookshier duo worked three Super Bowls (X, XII, and XIV) together.
He later paired with Pat Summerall on the primary broadcast team for National Football League (NFL) games on CBS during the 1970s.

Sports commentator

play-by-playsportscastercommentator
George Allen "Pat" Summerall (May 10, 1930 – April 16, 2013) was an American football player and television sportscaster, having worked at CBS, Fox, and ESPN.
In the United States, George "Pat" Summerall, a former professional kicker, spent most of his broadcasting career as a play-by-play announcer.

Pete Rozelle Radio-Television Award

Pete Rozelle AwardPete Rozelle Radio & Television Award
That year, he also received the Pete Rozelle Radio-Television Award from the Pro Football Hall of Fame.
1994 – Pat Summerall

1958 NFL Championship Game

1958The Greatest Game Ever PlayedNFL Championship
After that season, he was traded and went on to play for the Chicago Cardinals from 1953 to 1957 and the New York Giants from 1958 to 1961, during which he was a part of The Greatest Game Ever Played.
In the final game of the regular season, the Giants defeated the Cleveland Browns with Pat Summerall's game-winning 49-yard field goal on the final play (the longest field goal made in the entire season among all NFL kickers).

NFL on CBS

CBSNFLCBS Sports
After retiring from football, Summerall was hired by CBS Sports in 1962 to work as a color commentator on the network's NFL coverage.
As Giants players retired to the broadcast booth in the early and 1960s, first Pat Summerall, then Frank Gifford took the color analyst slot next to Schenkel.

1958 New York Giants season

New York GiantsGiants1958
After that season, he was traded and went on to play for the Chicago Cardinals from 1953 to 1957 and the New York Giants from 1958 to 1961, during which he was a part of The Greatest Game Ever Played.
The Giants obtained Lindon Crow and Pat Summerall from the Chicago Cardinals in exchange for Dick Nolan, Bobby Joe Conrad, and the Giants' first round pick.

John Madden

All-MaddenMaddenChip Imitation
He worked with Tom Brookshier and then John Madden on NFL telecasts for CBS and Fox.
After working lower profile contests for CBS during his first two years, he was elevated to the network's top football broadcasting duo with Pat Summerall in 1981, replacing Tom Brookshier.

National Sports Media Association

National Sportscasters and Sportswriters Association Hall of FameNSSAHall of Fame
He was named the National Sportscaster of the Year by the National Sportscasters and Sportswriters Association in 1977, and inducted into their Hall of Fame in 1994.
19. 1977 – Pat Summerall (CBS)

ESPN Sunday Night Football

ESPNSunday Night FootballSunday night
George Allen "Pat" Summerall (May 10, 1930 – April 16, 2013) was an American football player and television sportscaster, having worked at CBS, Fox, and ESPN.
In 2004, Pat Summerall replaced Patrick for the preseason and for several regular season weeks following Patrick's recovery from open-heart surgery.

1952 NFL Draft

19521952 National Football League draftNFL Draft
The Detroit Lions drafted Summerall as a fourth-round draft choice in the 1952 NFL Draft.

NFL on NBC

NBCNFLNBC Sports
For the postgame coverage of the very first Super Bowl at the end of the 1967 season (which was simulcast by CBS and NBC), the trophy presentation ceremony was handled by CBS' Summerall (who worked as a reporter, while CBS' game coverage was called by Ray Scott, Jack Whitaker and Frank Gifford) and NBC's George Ratterman.
Also helping with NBC's coverage were Jim Simpson (reporting from the sidelines) and Pat Summerall (helping conduct player interviews for the pregame show, along with Rote).

NFL Films

NFL FilmNFL Films Presents: One-game WondersNFL Films Top 10 Shows
He also co-hosted the syndicated NFL Films series This Week in Pro Football in the late 1960s and early 1970s.
Former Giant Frank Gifford periodically narrated New York Giants season reviews (notably the company's throwback-themed 2013 season recap) until his death in 2015, and ex-Giants teammate Pat Summerall narrated highlight films for many teams until his death in 2013.

Ray Scott (sportscaster)

Ray Scott
In 1968, after CBS abandoned the practice of assigning dedicated announcing crews to particular NFL teams, Summerall ascended to the network's lead national crew, pairing with Jack Buck and then Ray Scott.
In 1968, CBS ended its practice of assigning dedicated announcing crews to particular teams, and Scott was appointed to the network's lead NFL crew, teaming with Paul Christman (1968–69) and Pat Summerall (1970–73).

CBS Sports

CBSCBSSports.comCBSSportsline.com
George Allen "Pat" Summerall (May 10, 1930 – April 16, 2013) was an American football player and television sportscaster, having worked at CBS, Fox, and ESPN. After retiring from football, Summerall was hired by CBS Sports in 1962 to work as a color commentator on the network's NFL coverage.
NFL on CBS – Marv Albert, Brian Anderson, Gary Bender, Jack Buck, Don Criqui, Irv Cross, Mike Emrick, Dick Enberg, Frank Glieber, Gus Johnson, Verne Lundquist, Bill Macatee, Sean McDonough, Jim McKay, Tim Ryan, Ray Scott, Chris Schenkel, Vin Scully, Dick Stockton, Pat Summerall

Arkansas Razorbacks

ArkansasUniversity of ArkansasRazorbacks
Summerall played football for the Arkansas Razorbacks and then in the National Football League (NFL) from 1952 through 1961.
Pat Summerall – played ten years in the NFL, primarily as a kicker; best known as a broadcaster, gaining prominence with his partner John Madden.

Columbia High School (Lake City, Florida)

Columbia High SchoolColumbiaColumbia (Lake City)
At Columbia High School, Lake City, Florida, Summerall played football, tennis, baseball, and basketball.
Pat Summerall, an All-State selection in football and basketball for Columbia High School in the 1940s and the 1946 individual state tennis runner-up. Went on to play 10 seasons in the NFL for the then-Chicago Cardinals and the New York Giants, before starting his career as a broadcaster.

1958 NFL season

19581958 seasonNov 27, 1958
Summerall's most memorable professional moment may well have been at the very end of the December 14, 1958 regular season finale between his Giants and the Cleveland Browns at Yankee Stadium.
The Giants' Pat Summerall missed a 31-yard field goal with 4½ minutes left.

Vin Scully

The Vin Scully ShowVincent Edward Scully
Instead, CBS' #2 broadcast team of Vin Scully and Hank Stram handled the broadcast while Madden was given the weekend off to travel to Pontiac, Michigan for the game and to prepare for the broadcast.
Scully also contributed to the network's tennis and PGA Tour golf coverage in the late 1970s and early 1980s, usually working the golf events with Pat Summerall, Ken Venturi, and Ben Wright.

Super Bowl X

X1975Super Bowl
The network's #1 NFL crew now consisted of Summerall and analyst Tom Brookshier (with whom he had previously worked on This Week in Pro Football), and the colorful Summerall-Brookshier duo worked three Super Bowls (X, XII, and XIV) together.
CBS televised the game in the United States with play-by-play announcer Pat Summerall (calling his first Super Bowl in that role) and color commentator Tom Brookshier.

Super Bowl XIV

XIVSuper Bowl1979
The network's #1 NFL crew now consisted of Summerall and analyst Tom Brookshier (with whom he had previously worked on This Week in Pro Football), and the colorful Summerall-Brookshier duo worked three Super Bowls (X, XII, and XIV) together.
CBS televised the game in the United States with play-by-play announcer Pat Summerall and color commentator Tom Brookshier.

Jack Buck

BuckJackJack Buck Statue
In 1968, after CBS abandoned the practice of assigning dedicated announcing crews to particular NFL teams, Summerall ascended to the network's lead national crew, pairing with Jack Buck and then Ray Scott.
Late in the 1990 NFL season, Buck's onetime CBS broadcasting partner, Pat Summerall, was hospitalized with a bleeding ulcer after vomiting on a plane during a flight after a game, and was out for a considerable amount of time.

Super Bowl XXI

XXI1986Super Bowl
While the two were paired on CBS, they called Super Bowls XVI, XVIII, XXI, XXIV, and XXVI together.
The game was broadcast in the United States by CBS and featured the broadcast team of play-by-play announcer Pat Summerall and color commentator John Madden.

Super Bowl XVIII

XVIII19831984
While the two were paired on CBS, they called Super Bowls XVI, XVIII, XXI, XXIV, and XXVI together.
The game was broadcast in the United States by CBS and featured the broadcast team of play-by-play announcer Pat Summerall and color commentator John Madden.

Super Bowl XXIV

XXIV19891990
While the two were paired on CBS, they called Super Bowls XVI, XVIII, XXI, XXIV, and XXVI together.
The game was broadcast in the United States by CBS and featured the broadcast team of play-by-play announcer Pat Summerall and color commentator John Madden.