Patagium

uropatagiumpatagiaflight membranesinterfemoral membranepropatagiumwing membranesplagiopatagiummembranesuropatagiacruropatagium
The patagium (plural: patagia) is a membranous structure that assists an animal in gliding or flight.wikipedia
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Bat

batsChiropterachiropteran
The structure is found in living and extinct groups of animals including bats, birds, some dromaeosaurs, pterosaurs, gliding mammals, some flying lizards, and flying frogs.
Bats are more manoeuvrable than birds, flying with their very long spread-out digits covered with a thin membrane or patagium.

Draco (genus)

Dracoflying lizardDraco taeniopterus
The structure is found in living and extinct groups of animals including bats, birds, some dromaeosaurs, pterosaurs, gliding mammals, some flying lizards, and flying frogs.
These lizards are capable of gliding flight; their ribs and their connecting membrane may be extended to create "wings" (patagia), the hindlimbs are flattened and wing-like in cross-section, and a flap on the neck (the gular flag) serves as a horizontal stabilizer.

Pterosaur

pterosaursPterosauriapterodactyl
The structure is found in living and extinct groups of animals including bats, birds, some dromaeosaurs, pterosaurs, gliding mammals, some flying lizards, and flying frogs.
The brachiopatagium ("arm membrane") was the primary component of the wing, stretching from the highly elongated fourth finger of the hand to the hindlimbs.

Flying squirrel

Pteromyiniflying squirrelsflying-squirrel
Flying squirrels, sugar gliders, colugos, anomalures and other mammals also have patagia that extends between the limbs; as in bats and pterosaurs, they also possess propatagia and uropatagia.
They are not capable of flight in the same way as birds or bats but are able to glide from one tree to another with the aid of a patagium, a furry, parachute-like membrane that stretches from wrist to ankle.

Sugar glider

Petaurus brevicepssugar gliderssugar
Flying squirrels, sugar gliders, colugos, anomalures and other mammals also have patagia that extends between the limbs; as in bats and pterosaurs, they also possess propatagia and uropatagia.
The sugar glider is characterised by its gliding membrane, known as the patagium, which extends from its forelegs to its hindlegs, one on each side of its body.

Colugo

DermopteraCynocephalidaecolugos
Flying squirrels, sugar gliders, colugos, anomalures and other mammals also have patagia that extends between the limbs; as in bats and pterosaurs, they also possess propatagia and uropatagia. Various species have styliform bones to support the membranes, either on the elbow (colugos, anomalures, greater glider, Eomys) or on the wrist (flying squirrels).
This gliding membrane, or patagium, runs from the shoulder blades to the fore paws, from the tip of the rear-most fingers to the tip of the toes, and from the hind legs to the tip of the tail.

Greater glider

PetauroidesPetauroides volansgreater gliders
Various species have styliform bones to support the membranes, either on the elbow (colugos, anomalures, greater glider, Eomys) or on the wrist (flying squirrels).
Each side of the body bears membranes stretching between the elbow and the ankle that give the animal the ability to perform controlled glides.

Flying and gliding animals

glideflyingvolant
In gliding species, such as some lizards and flying frogs, it is the flat parachute-like extension of skin that catches the air, which allows gliding flight.
They had large wings formed by a patagium stretching from the torso to a dramatically lengthened fourth finger.

Gliding flight

glidingglideglide ratio
In gliding species, such as some lizards and flying frogs, it is the flat parachute-like extension of skin that catches the air, which allows gliding flight.
As with sustained flight, gliding generally requires the application of an airfoil, such as the wings on aircraft or birds, or the gliding membrane of a gliding possum.

Psittacosaurus

PsittacosauridaePsittacosaurus mongoliensispsittacosaurid
A patagium has been found in the dinosaur Psittacosaurus, and ran from the animal's ankle to the base of the tail.
The specimen also had dense clusters of pigment on its shoulders, face (possibly for display), and cloaca (which may have had an antimicrobial function), as well as large patagia on its hind legs that connected to the base of the tail.

Scansoriopterygidae

scansoriopterygidscansoriopterygids
Other scansoriopterygids might have had similar patagia, based on their long third fingers.
At least two species, Yi qi and Ambopteryx longibrachium, developed a patagium, supporting it with the elongated third finger as well as a unique styliform wrist bone akin to similar structures in flying squirrels, bats, pterosaurs and anomalures.

Flight

flyingflyflies
The patagium (plural: patagia) is a membranous structure that assists an animal in gliding or flight.

Dromaeosauridae

dromaeosauriddromaeosaurdromaeosaurids
The structure is found in living and extinct groups of animals including bats, birds, some dromaeosaurs, pterosaurs, gliding mammals, some flying lizards, and flying frogs.

Flying frog

flying frogsflying' frogsgliding
The structure is found in living and extinct groups of animals including bats, birds, some dromaeosaurs, pterosaurs, gliding mammals, some flying lizards, and flying frogs. In gliding species, such as some lizards and flying frogs, it is the flat parachute-like extension of skin that catches the air, which allows gliding flight.

Skin

cutaneousskin cellanimal skin
In bats, the skin forming the surface of the wing is an extension of the skin of the abdomen that runs to the tip of each digit, uniting the forelimb with the body.

Anomalure

Anomaluridaeanomaluroidscaly-tailed squirrel
Flying squirrels, sugar gliders, colugos, anomalures and other mammals also have patagia that extends between the limbs; as in bats and pterosaurs, they also possess propatagia and uropatagia. Various species have styliform bones to support the membranes, either on the elbow (colugos, anomalures, greater glider, Eomys) or on the wrist (flying squirrels).

Eomys

Eomys quercyiEomys helveticus
Various species have styliform bones to support the membranes, either on the elbow (colugos, anomalures, greater glider, Eomys) or on the wrist (flying squirrels).

Lizard

lizardsLacertiliaLacertilia indet.
In gliding species, such as some lizards and flying frogs, it is the flat parachute-like extension of skin that catches the air, which allows gliding flight.

Parachute

bail outbailed outparachuting
In gliding species, such as some lizards and flying frogs, it is the flat parachute-like extension of skin that catches the air, which allows gliding flight.

Lepidoptera

lepidopteranbutterflies and mothslepidopterans
In some lepidoptera insect species, it is one of a pair of small sensory organs situated at the bases of the anterior wings.

Bird

birdsAvesavian
The structure is found in living and extinct groups of animals including bats, birds, some dromaeosaurs, pterosaurs, gliding mammals, some flying lizards, and flying frogs. In birds, the propatagium is the elastic fold of skin extending from the shoulder to the carpal joint, making up the leading edge of the inner wing.

Carpal bones

carpuscarpalcarpal bone
In birds, the propatagium is the elastic fold of skin extending from the shoulder to the carpal joint, making up the leading edge of the inner wing.

Yi (dinosaur)

Yi qiYiYi'' (dinosaur)
Yi qi has a rather elaborate, superficially bat-like patagium in the forelimbs, unique among dinosaurs.

Megabat

Pteropodidaefruit batfruit bats
They can be differentiated from other bats due to their dog-like faces, clawed second digits, and reduced uropatagium.