Patagon

1840s (fanciful) illustration of a Patagon chief from near the Strait of Magellan, bedecked in costume of war; from Voyage au pole sud et dans l'Oceanie... by French explorer Jules Dumont d'Urville
1840s illustration of Patagon encampment; from account by French explorer Jules Dumont d'Urville

The Patagones or Patagonian giants were a race of giant humans rumoured to be living in Patagonia and described in early European accounts.

- Patagon
1840s (fanciful) illustration of a Patagon chief from near the Strait of Magellan, bedecked in costume of war; from Voyage au pole sud et dans l'Oceanie... by French explorer Jules Dumont d'Urville

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Patagonia

Patagonia refers to a geographical region that encompasses the southern end of South America, governed by Argentina and Chile.

Patagonia refers to a geographical region that encompasses the southern end of South America, governed by Argentina and Chile.

Río Negro Province, Argentina.
Ainsworth Bay and Marinelli Glacier, Chile.
View of Punta Arenas, Chile, in winter
Santa Cruz Province
Black-browed albatross, near Ushuaia
Map of the indigenous peoples of Southern Patagonia
Cueva de las Manos site in Santa Cruz, Argentina
Nao Victoria, the replica of the first ship to pass through the Strait of Magellan
An 1840s illustration of indigenous Patagonians from near the Straits of Magellan, from Voyage au pole sud et dans l'Océanie by French explorer Jules Dumont d'Urville
Tehuelche warriors in Patagonia
Map of the advance of the Argentine frontier until the establishment of zanja de Alsina
Under General Roca, the Conquest of the Desert extended Argentine power into Patagonia
Tierra del Fuego sheep ranch, 1942: The region's primary activity then, it has been eclipsed by the decline in the global wool market as much as by petroleum and gas extraction.
Gauchos mustering sheep in Patagonia
Whale watching off the Valdes Peninsula
La Trochita on its Chubut Province route: Formerly the sole rapid transport means in the province, La Trochita is now a tourist attraction.

The name Patagonia comes from the word patagón.

Mulato, a Tehuelche Chief.

Tehuelche people

Indigenous people from Patagonia in South America, with existing members of the group currently residing in the southern Argentina-Chile borders.

Indigenous people from Patagonia in South America, with existing members of the group currently residing in the southern Argentina-Chile borders.

Mulato, a Tehuelche Chief.
The approximate distribution of languages in the southernmost regions of South America during the years of the Spanish conquest.
Tehuelche chiefs, located in Santa Cruz Province in the south of Argentina.
Grupo de patagones en puerto Peckett. An 1832 drawing made during the voyage of Jules Dumont d'Urville.
Distribution of pre-Hispanic peoples in Southern Patagonia
Tehuelche Cloak. Museo de La Plata.
The classification of Chonan languages, according to Roberto Lehmann-Nitsche.
Rock art at Cueva de las Manos, Santa Cruz Province.
Portrait of Chief Junchar by José del Pozo in Puerto Deseado, in 1789, during the Malaspina Expedition (1789–1794).
Tehuelches in Río Gallegos.
Under General Roca, the Conquest of the Desert extended Argentine power into Patagonia
Elderly Tehuelche woman smoking a tobacco pipe.
Rosa Chiquichano, of Tehuelche descent. A past member of the Argentine Chamber of Deputies, representing the Chubut Province.
The Tehuelche flag: The blue of the sea, the brown of the mountains, the black arrow pointing north and the Southern Cross.

Pigaffetta described these people as a mythical tribe of Patagonian giants.

Page de titre "Relation d'un voyage fait en 1695, 1696 et 1697."

A Relation of a Voyage

Nineteen years old at the date of departure.

Nineteen years old at the date of departure.

Page de titre "Relation d'un voyage fait en 1695, 1696 et 1697."
p. 14
p. 16
p. 41
p. 57
p. 73
p. 94
p. 127

During the journey, they meet Patagones, and Froger describes their habits and customs.

"Tulor" settlement near San Pedro de Atacama, a Pre-Columbian Atacameño culture

History of Chile

Colony between 1540 and 1818, when it gained independence from Spain.

Colony between 1540 and 1818, when it gained independence from Spain.

"Tulor" settlement near San Pedro de Atacama, a Pre-Columbian Atacameño culture
The Mapuche were the original inhabitants of central and southern Chile
Pedro de Valdivia
Picture "The young Lautaro" of Pedro Subercaseaux that show to genius military and hero of the Arauco war after the arrival of the Spanish to Chilean territory
Bernardo O'Higgins
Chilean and Argentinean troops going to the Battle of Chacabuco (February 12, 1817) led by José de San Martín
Chilean patriots, by Johann Moritz Rugendas
The Arauco War. The painting depicts a woman being kidnapped during a malón
Diego Portales
Fiestas Patrias of Chile, 1854
Map showing changes of territory due to the War of the Pacific
José Manuel Balmaceda
Picture of the 1915 presidential election in Chile
Arturo Alessandri Palma
Marchers for Salvador Allende
Augusto Pinochet
Chilean (orange) and average Latin American (blue) rates of growth of GDP (1971–2007)
Five presidents of Chile since Transition to democracy (1990–2022), celebrating the Bicentennial of Chile

The name Patagonia comes from the word patagón used by Magellan to describe the native people whom his expedition thought to be giants.

Robert Boyle

Scientific racism

Pseudoscientific belief that empirical evidence exists to support or justify racism , racial inferiority, or racial superiority.

Pseudoscientific belief that empirical evidence exists to support or justify racism , racial inferiority, or racial superiority.

Robert Boyle
Henry Home, Lord Kames
Homo monstrosus, or Patagonian giants, from Voyage au pole sud et dans l'Océanie (Voyage to the South Pole, and in Oceania), by Jules Dumont d'Urville
John Hunter. Painted by John Jackson in 1813, after an original by Sir Joshua Reynolds, who exhibited his painting at the Royal Academy in 1786.
Charles White
Johann Friedrich Blumenbach
Christoph Meiners
Georges Cuvier
Arthur Schopenhauer
A late-19th-century illustration by H. Strickland Constable shows an alleged similarity between "Irish Iberian" and "Negro" features in contrast to the higher "Anglo-Teutonic".
Portrait of Arthur de Gobineau by the Comtesse de la Tour, 1876
Charles Darwin in 1868
Herbert Hope Risley
Ernst Haeckel
Pieter Camper
Racialist differences: "a Negro head ... a Caucasian skull ... a Mongol head", Samuel George Morton, 1839
Illustration from Types of Mankind (1854), whose authors Josiah Clark Nott and George Robins Gliddon implied that "Negroes" were a creational rank between "Greeks" and chimpanzees
Cephalic Index. William Z. Ripley's European cephalic index map, The Races of Europe (1899).
Joseph Deniker
Madison Grant, creator of the "Nordic race" term
Samuel Cartwright, M.D.
Francis Galton in his later years
The Swedish State Institute for Racial Biology, founded in 1922, was the world's first government-funded institute performing research into racial biology. It was housed in what is now the Dean's house at Uppsala and was closed down in 1958.
Nazi poster promoting eugenics
Lothrop Stoddard (1883–1950)

The Monstrosus were mythologic humans which did not appear in the first editions of Systema Naturae. The sub-species included: the “four-footed, mute, hairy” Homo feralis (Feral man); the animal-reared Juvenis lupinus hessensis (Hessian wolf boy); the Juvenis hannoveranus (Hannoverian boy); the Puella campanica (Wild-girl of Champagne); the agile, but faint-hearted Homo monstrosus (Monstrous man); the Patagonian giant; the Dwarf of the Alps; and the monorchid Khoikhoi (Hottentot). In Amoenitates academicae (1763), Linnaeus presented the mythologic Homo anthropomorpha (Anthropomorphic man), or humanoid creatures, such as the troglodyte, the satyr, the hydra, and the phoenix, incorrectly identified as simian creatures.

The Strait of Magellan at the southern tip of South America

Strait of Magellan

Navigable sea route in southern Chile separating mainland South America to the north and Tierra del Fuego to the south.

Navigable sea route in southern Chile separating mainland South America to the north and Tierra del Fuego to the south.

The Strait of Magellan at the southern tip of South America
Strait of Magellan
A replica of Victoria, one of Magellan's ships, in the Museo Nao Victoria, Punta Arenas, Chile
View of the capitulaciones granted by Charles V, Holy Roman Emperor in 1534
Map showing the extent of the Patagonian Ice Sheet in the Strait of Magellan area during the Last Glacial Period. Selected modern settlements are shown with yellow dots.
The County of Peebles and Cavenga are used as a breakwater for the harbour at Punta Arenas.
Port of Punta Arenas in winter
Barcaza Melinka at Porvenir port, providing a ferry service across the strait between Punta Arenas and Porvenir
The Strait of Magellan at dawn
U.S. Navy carrier USS Ronald Reagan in the strait

Magellan also gave the name Patagones to the mainland Indians, and their land was subsequently known as Patagonia.

The location of the Argentine Republic

Index of Argentina-related articles

Alphabetical list of topics related to the Argentine Republic.

Alphabetical list of topics related to the Argentine Republic.

The location of the Argentine Republic
A map of Argentina
The Coat of arms of Argentina
The Flag of Argentina

Patagon

City of the Caesars

Mythical city of South America.

Mythical city of South America.

Its purported founders include survivors of a Spanish shipwreck in the Strait of Magellan, survivors in exile of the Destruction of the Seven Cities, ghosts, Patagonian giants and survivors of the Inca Empire; indeed, one explanation of the legend is that it derived from stories told to sailors by aborigines describing the Empire of Peru.

List of Chile-related topics

Outline of topics related to the Republic of Chile.

Outline of topics related to the Republic of Chile.

Patagon

Ranquel

Indigenous tribe from the northern part of La Pampa Province, Argentina, in South America.

Indigenous tribe from the northern part of La Pampa Province, Argentina, in South America.

With Puelche, Pehuenche and also Patagones from the Günün-a-Küna group origins, they were conquered by the Mapuche.