1840s (fanciful) illustration of a Patagon chief from near the Strait of Magellan, bedecked in costume of war; from Voyage au pole sud et dans l'Oceanie... by French explorer Jules Dumont d'Urville
Robert Boyle
1840s illustration of Patagon encampment; from account by French explorer Jules Dumont d'Urville
Henry Home, Lord Kames
Homo monstrosus, or Patagonian giants, from Voyage au pole sud et dans l'Océanie (Voyage to the South Pole, and in Oceania), by Jules Dumont d'Urville
John Hunter. Painted by John Jackson in 1813, after an original by Sir Joshua Reynolds, who exhibited his painting at the Royal Academy in 1786.
Charles White
Johann Friedrich Blumenbach
Christoph Meiners
Georges Cuvier
Arthur Schopenhauer
A late-19th-century illustration by H. Strickland Constable shows an alleged similarity between "Irish Iberian" and "Negro" features in contrast to the higher "Anglo-Teutonic".
Portrait of Arthur de Gobineau by the Comtesse de la Tour, 1876
Charles Darwin in 1868
Herbert Hope Risley
Ernst Haeckel
Pieter Camper
Racialist differences: "a Negro head ... a Caucasian skull ... a Mongol head", Samuel George Morton, 1839
Illustration from Types of Mankind (1854), whose authors Josiah Clark Nott and George Robins Gliddon implied that "Negroes" were a creational rank between "Greeks" and chimpanzees
Cephalic Index. William Z. Ripley's European cephalic index map, The Races of Europe (1899).
Joseph Deniker
Madison Grant, creator of the "Nordic race" term
Samuel Cartwright, M.D.
Francis Galton in his later years
The Swedish State Institute for Racial Biology, founded in 1922, was the world's first government-funded institute performing research into racial biology. It was housed in what is now the Dean's house at Uppsala and was closed down in 1958.
Nazi poster promoting eugenics
Lothrop Stoddard (1883–1950)

The Patagones or Patagonian giants were a race of giant humans rumoured to be living in Patagonia and described in early European accounts.

- Patagon

The Monstrosus were mythologic humans which did not appear in the first editions of Systema Naturae. The sub-species included: the “four-footed, mute, hairy” Homo feralis (Feral man); the animal-reared Juvenis lupinus hessensis (Hessian wolf boy); the Juvenis hannoveranus (Hannoverian boy); the Puella campanica (Wild-girl of Champagne); the agile, but faint-hearted Homo monstrosus (Monstrous man); the Patagonian giant; the Dwarf of the Alps; and the monorchid Khoikhoi (Hottentot). In Amoenitates academicae (1763), Linnaeus presented the mythologic Homo anthropomorpha (Anthropomorphic man), or humanoid creatures, such as the troglodyte, the satyr, the hydra, and the phoenix, incorrectly identified as simian creatures.

- Scientific racism
1840s (fanciful) illustration of a Patagon chief from near the Strait of Magellan, bedecked in costume of war; from Voyage au pole sud et dans l'Oceanie... by French explorer Jules Dumont d'Urville

0 related topics

Alpha