Path (computing)

pathUNCpathnamepathsfile pathUniform Naming Conventionrelative pathUNC pathabsolute pathdirectory separator
A path, the general form of the name of a file or directory, specifies a unique location in a file system.wikipedia
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Slash (punctuation)

slash/solidus
The delimiting character is most commonly the slash, the backslash character, or colon, though some operating systems may use a different delimiter.
The slash is used as the path component separator in many computer operating systems (e.g., Unix's pictures/image.png).

Working directory

current working directorycurrent directorycurrent drive
An absolute or full path points to the same location in a file system, regardless of the current working directory.
When the process refers to a file using a simple file name or relative path (as opposed to a file designated by a full path from a root directory), the reference is interpreted relative to the current working directory of the process.

File system

filesystemfile systemsfilesystems
A path, the general form of the name of a file or directory, specifies a unique location in a file system.
In non-Unix-like systems, such as TOPS-10 and other operating systems influenced by it, where the full filename or pathname of a file can include a device prefix, devices other than those containing file systems are referred to by a device prefix specifying the device, without anything following it.

Directory (computing)

directorydirectoriesfolder
A path, the general form of the name of a file or directory, specifies a unique location in a file system.
A reference to a location in a directory system is called a path.

Backslash

\(back)slashback slash
The delimiting character is most commonly the slash, the backslash character, or colon, though some operating systems may use a different delimiter.
Except for COMMAND.COM, all other parts of the operating system accept both characters in a path, but the Microsoft convention remains to use a backslash, and APIs that return paths use backslashes.

URL

URLsUniform Resource Locatorweb address
Paths are used extensively in computer science to represent the directory/file relationships common in modern operating systems, and are essential in the construction of Uniform Resource Locators (URLs).
The format combines the pre-existing system of domain names (created in 1985) with file path syntax, where slashes are used to separate directory and filenames.

Won sign

won currency symbolWon sign (₩)
Japanese and Korean versions of Windows may often display the '¥' character or the '₩' character instead of the directory separator.
The directory separator character also appears on Korean versions of Microsoft Windows as ₩, because position x5C is used both for the won sign on code page 949 and also for backslash in ASCII.

PowerShell

Windows PowerShellcmdletCmdlets
Note that many other shells available for Windows, such as tcsh and Windows PowerShell, allow the slash.
Cmdlets can use .NET data access APIs directly or use the PowerShell infrastructure of PowerShell Providers, which make data stores addressable using unique paths.

Yen sign

¥CN¥1Yen symbol
Japanese and Korean versions of Windows may often display the '¥' character or the '₩' character instead of the directory separator.
It is nonetheless used wherever a backslash is used, such as the directory separator character (for example, in ) and as the general escape character.

CP/M

CP/M-80CP/M operating systemBDOS
However, files stored in the USER 0 area were accessible to all other users; their location was specified with a prefatory path, since the files of USER 0 were only visible to someone logged in as USER 0.

Cd (command)

cdCHDIR
cd bobapples
The command has been implemented in operating systems such as Unix, DOS, IBM OS/2, MetaComCo TRIPOS, AmigaOS (where if a bare path is given, cd is implied), Microsoft Windows, ReactOS, and Linux.

Leaning toothpick syndrome

Since UNCs start with two backslashes, and the backslash is also used for string escaping and in regular expressions, this can result in extreme cases of leaning toothpick syndrome: an escaped string for a regular expression matching a UNC begins with 8 backslashes – – because the string and regular expression both require escaping.
A similar phenomenon occurs for DOS/Windows paths, where the backslash is used as a path separator, requiring a doubled backslash – this can then be re-escaped for a regular expression inside an escaped string, requiring to match a single backslash.

DIGITAL Command Language

DCL.DCLDCL command prompt
Unlike other systems which use paths for locating commands, DCL requires commands to be defined explicitly, either via CLD (Command Language Definition) definitions or a foreign symbol.

AmigaOS

Amiga OSAmigaWorkbench
In the case of filesystem, the specifier usually consists of a path to a file in the filesystem; for other handlers, specifiers usually set characteristics of the desired input/output channel (for the SER: serial port driver, for example, the specifier will contain bit rate, start and stop bits, etc.).

Basename

When basename is given a pathname, it will delete any prefix up to the last slash character and return the result.

Dirname

When dirname is given a pathname, it will delete any suffix beginning with the last slash character and return the result.

String literal

stringraw stringliteral string
This can be simplified by using raw strings, as in C#'s or Python's, or regular expression literals, as in Perl's.
Raw strings are particularly useful when a common character needs to be escaped, notably in regular expressions (nested as string literals), where backslash is widely used, and in DOS/Windows paths, where backslash is used as a path separator.

Fully qualified name

fully qualified file namefully qualified class namefully (database, schema, and table) qualified

Filename

file namename6.3 filename
A path, the general form of the name of a file or directory, specifies a unique location in a file system.

Computer file

filefilescomputer files
A path, the general form of the name of a file or directory, specifies a unique location in a file system.

String (computer science)

stringstringscharacter string
A path points to a file system location by following the directory tree hierarchy expressed in a string of characters in which path components, separated by a delimiting character, represent each directory.

Character (computing)

charactercharacterstext
A path points to a file system location by following the directory tree hierarchy expressed in a string of characters in which path components, separated by a delimiting character, represent each directory.

Operating system

operating systemsOScomputer operating system
The delimiting character is most commonly the slash, the backslash character, or colon, though some operating systems may use a different delimiter.

Delimiter

delimiter collisiondelimiteddelimit
The delimiting character is most commonly the slash, the backslash character, or colon, though some operating systems may use a different delimiter.

Computer science

computer scientistcomputer sciencescomputer scientists
Paths are used extensively in computer science to represent the directory/file relationships common in modern operating systems, and are essential in the construction of Uniform Resource Locators (URLs).