Patikulamanasikara

paṭikūlamanasikāra32 Body Partsasubhaasubha bhavanaaśubhasaṃjnāaṣubhasaṃjñāsbodily foulnessimpurity of the bodyKāyagatāsatiloathsome
Paikkūlamanasikāra (variant: paikūlamanasikāra) is a Pāli term that is generally translated as "reflections on repulsiveness".wikipedia
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Buddhist meditation

meditationmeditatingmeditative
It refers to a traditional Buddhist meditation whereby thirty-one parts of the body are contemplated in a variety of ways. While the Pali Canon invariably includes this form of contemplation in its various lists of mindfulness meditation techniques, the compendious fifth-century Visuddhimagga identifies this type of contemplation (along with anapanasati) as one of the few body-directed meditations particularly suited to the development of samādhi (Vism.
Buddhists pursue meditation as part of the path toward liberation, awakening and Nirvana, and includes a variety of meditation techniques, most notably asubha bhavana ("reflections on repulsiveness"); reflection on pratityasamutpada (dependent origination); sati (mindfulness) and anussati (recollections), including anapanasati (breath meditation); dhyana (developing an alert and luminous mind); and the Brahma-viharas (loving-kindness and compassion).

Ānanda

AnandaAnanAnandamaya kosha
For instance, in the Girimananda Sutta (AN 10.60), Ananda's recitation of this and other contemplations immediately cures an ailing monk.
The Buddha then taught Prakṛti to reflect on the repulsive qualities of the human body, and eventually Prakṛti was ordained as a bhikkhunī, giving up her attachment for Ānanda.

Kayagatasati Sutta

Mindfulness immersed in the body
The Sutta also outlines the practice of "reflections on repulsiveness of the body" (Patikulamanasikara).

Satipatthana Sutta

Satipaṭṭhāna SuttaMahasatipatthana SuttaMahasatipaṭṭhāna Sutta
In regards to this and other body-centered meditation objects, the Satipatthana Sutta (DN 22) provides the following additional context and expected results:

Pali

PāliPali languagePāḷi
Paikkūlamanasikāra (variant: paikūlamanasikāra) is a Pāli term that is generally translated as "reflections on repulsiveness".

Sati (Buddhism)

mindfulnesssatiMindfulness (Buddhism)
In addition to developing sati (mindfulness) and samādhi (concentration), this form of meditation is considered conducive to overcoming desire and lust.

Samadhi

samādhiconcentrationSamadhi (Buddhism)
In addition to developing sati (mindfulness) and samādhi (concentration), this form of meditation is considered conducive to overcoming desire and lust.

Meditation

meditativemeditatemeditating
In addition to developing sati (mindfulness) and samādhi (concentration), this form of meditation is considered conducive to overcoming desire and lust.

Locative case

locativelocativesL
Manasikāra (Pāli), derived from manasi (locative of mana thus, loosely, "in mind" or "in thought") and karoti ("to make" or "to bring into") and has been translated as "attention" or "pondering" or "fixed thought".

Anussati

recollectEight ''anusmṛtisprevious lives
This is also one of the "four protective meditations", along with anussati (recollection of the Buddha), mettā (benevolence) practice and recollection of death.

Maitrī

mettāmettaloving-kindness
This is also one of the "four protective meditations", along with anussati (recollection of the Buddha), mettā (benevolence) practice and recollection of death.

Sariputta

SariputraSāriputtaŚāriputra
Sariputta declares that meditating on these 31 body parts leads to "the attainment of vision, in four ways", and briefly outlines how this method can be used as a springboard by which one "comes to know the unbroken stream of human consciousness that is not established either in this world or in the next".

Iddhipada

iddhipāda4 Bases of PowerFour bases of magical/mental/supernatural power
In addition, in the Iddhipāda-samyutta s Vibhanga Sutta (SN 51.20), this meditation subject is used to develop the four bases of power (iddhipāda) by which one is able to achieve liberation from suffering.

Visuddhimagga

purificationThe Path of Purification
While the Pali Canon invariably includes this form of contemplation in its various lists of mindfulness meditation techniques, the compendious fifth-century Visuddhimagga identifies this type of contemplation (along with anapanasati) as one of the few body-directed meditations particularly suited to the development of samādhi (Vism.

Anapanasati

ānāpānasatiMindfulness of Breathinganapana
While the Pali Canon invariably includes this form of contemplation in its various lists of mindfulness meditation techniques, the compendious fifth-century Visuddhimagga identifies this type of contemplation (along with anapanasati) as one of the few body-directed meditations particularly suited to the development of samādhi (Vism.

Mahābhūta

Mahabhutaelementselement
In a few discourses, these 31 body parts are contextualized within the framework of the mahābhūta (the elements) so that the earth element is exemplified by the body parts from head hair to feces, and the water element is exemplified by bile through urine.

Khuddakapatha

KhpKhuddakapāṭhaKhp.
The 31 identified body parts in pātikūlamanasikāra contemplation are the same as the first 31 body parts identified in the "Dvattimsakara" ("32 Parts [of the Body]") verse (Khp. 3) regularly recited by monks.

Hair

Tooth

teethdentalmaxillary teeth

Skin

Bone

cortical bonebone tissuecancellous bone