Patronymic

patronymibnbinpatronymicspatronymic nameibnipatronymspatronymic suffixbintipatronyme
A patronymic, or patronym, is a component of a personal name based on the given name of one's father, grandfather (i.e., an avonymic), or an earlier male ancestor.wikipedia
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Matronymic

matronymmatronymic surnamematronymic name
A component of a name based on the name of one's mother or a female ancestor is a matronymic. In medieval times, an illegitimate child of unknown parentage would sometimes be termed "ibn Abihi", "son of his father" (notably Ziyad ibn Abihi.) In the Qur'an, Jesus (Isa in Arabic) is consistently termed "`Isa ibn Maryam" - a matronymic (in the Qur'an, Jesus has no father; see Islamic view of Jesus).
It is the female equivalent of a patronymic.

Personal name

birth namefull namepersonal names
A patronymic, or patronym, is a component of a personal name based on the given name of one's father, grandfather (i.e., an avonymic), or an earlier male ancestor.
Some cultures, including Western ones, also add (or once added) patronymics or matronymics.

Johnson

Johnson Master
Examples of such transformations include common English surnames such as Johnson (son of John).
The name itself is a patronym of the given name John, literally meaning "son of John".

Rodríguez (surname)

RodríguezRodriguez
Family names in many Celtic, Germanic, Iberian, Scandinavian, Armenian and Slavic languages originate from patronyms, e.g. Wilson (son of William), FitzGerald (son of Gerald), Powell (from "ap Hywel"), Fernández (son of Fernando), Rodríguez (son of Rodrigo), Anderson or Andersen (son of Anders, Scandinavian form of Andrew), Carlson or Carlsen (son of Carl), Ilyin (of Ilya), Petrov (of Peter), Grigorovich (son of Grigory, Russian form of Gregory), Stefanović (son of Stefan, little Stefan), MacAllister (from "mac Alistair", meaning son of Alistair, anglicized Scottish form of Alexander) and O'Conor (from "Ó Conchobhair", meaning grandson/descendant of Conchobhar).
Rodríguez is a Spanish patronymic (meaning Son of Rodrigo; archaic: Rodericksson) and a common surname in Spain, Latin America and the Philippines.

Anderson (surname)

AndersonAndersson
Family names in many Celtic, Germanic, Iberian, Scandinavian, Armenian and Slavic languages originate from patronyms, e.g. Wilson (son of William), FitzGerald (son of Gerald), Powell (from "ap Hywel"), Fernández (son of Fernando), Rodríguez (son of Rodrigo), Anderson or Andersen (son of Anders, Scandinavian form of Andrew), Carlson or Carlsen (son of Carl), Ilyin (of Ilya), Petrov (of Peter), Grigorovich (son of Grigory, Russian form of Gregory), Stefanović (son of Stefan, little Stefan), MacAllister (from "mac Alistair", meaning son of Alistair, anglicized Scottish form of Alexander) and O'Conor (from "Ó Conchobhair", meaning grandson/descendant of Conchobhar).
Anderson is a surname deriving from a patronymic meaning "son of Anders/Andrew" (itself derived from the Greek name "Andreas", meaning "man" or "manly").

Carlson (name)

Carlson
Family names in many Celtic, Germanic, Iberian, Scandinavian, Armenian and Slavic languages originate from patronyms, e.g. Wilson (son of William), FitzGerald (son of Gerald), Powell (from "ap Hywel"), Fernández (son of Fernando), Rodríguez (son of Rodrigo), Anderson or Andersen (son of Anders, Scandinavian form of Andrew), Carlson or Carlsen (son of Carl), Ilyin (of Ilya), Petrov (of Peter), Grigorovich (son of Grigory, Russian form of Gregory), Stefanović (son of Stefan, little Stefan), MacAllister (from "mac Alistair", meaning son of Alistair, anglicized Scottish form of Alexander) and O'Conor (from "Ó Conchobhair", meaning grandson/descendant of Conchobhar).
Carlson is a patronymic surname meaning "son of Carl".

Andersen

Family names in many Celtic, Germanic, Iberian, Scandinavian, Armenian and Slavic languages originate from patronyms, e.g. Wilson (son of William), FitzGerald (son of Gerald), Powell (from "ap Hywel"), Fernández (son of Fernando), Rodríguez (son of Rodrigo), Anderson or Andersen (son of Anders, Scandinavian form of Andrew), Carlson or Carlsen (son of Carl), Ilyin (of Ilya), Petrov (of Peter), Grigorovich (son of Grigory, Russian form of Gregory), Stefanović (son of Stefan, little Stefan), MacAllister (from "mac Alistair", meaning son of Alistair, anglicized Scottish form of Alexander) and O'Conor (from "Ó Conchobhair", meaning grandson/descendant of Conchobhar).
Andersen is a Danish-Norwegian patronymic surname meaning "son of Anders" (itself derived from the Greek name "Ανδρέας/Andreas", cf. English Andrew).

Wilson (name)

WilsonWilsons
Family names in many Celtic, Germanic, Iberian, Scandinavian, Armenian and Slavic languages originate from patronyms, e.g. Wilson (son of William), FitzGerald (son of Gerald), Powell (from "ap Hywel"), Fernández (son of Fernando), Rodríguez (son of Rodrigo), Anderson or Andersen (son of Anders, Scandinavian form of Andrew), Carlson or Carlsen (son of Carl), Ilyin (of Ilya), Petrov (of Peter), Grigorovich (son of Grigory, Russian form of Gregory), Stefanović (son of Stefan, little Stefan), MacAllister (from "mac Alistair", meaning son of Alistair, anglicized Scottish form of Alexander) and O'Conor (from "Ó Conchobhair", meaning grandson/descendant of Conchobhar).
The name is derived from a patronymic form of Will, a popular medieval name.

Anders

Family names in many Celtic, Germanic, Iberian, Scandinavian, Armenian and Slavic languages originate from patronyms, e.g. Wilson (son of William), FitzGerald (son of Gerald), Powell (from "ap Hywel"), Fernández (son of Fernando), Rodríguez (son of Rodrigo), Anderson or Andersen (son of Anders, Scandinavian form of Andrew), Carlson or Carlsen (son of Carl), Ilyin (of Ilya), Petrov (of Peter), Grigorovich (son of Grigory, Russian form of Gregory), Stefanović (son of Stefan, little Stefan), MacAllister (from "mac Alistair", meaning son of Alistair, anglicized Scottish form of Alexander) and O'Conor (from "Ó Conchobhair", meaning grandson/descendant of Conchobhar).
The great frequency of this name at the point in time (around 1900) when patronymics were converted into family names is the reason why 1 out of every 30 Swedes today is called Andersson.

Carlsen (name)

Carlsen
Family names in many Celtic, Germanic, Iberian, Scandinavian, Armenian and Slavic languages originate from patronyms, e.g. Wilson (son of William), FitzGerald (son of Gerald), Powell (from "ap Hywel"), Fernández (son of Fernando), Rodríguez (son of Rodrigo), Anderson or Andersen (son of Anders, Scandinavian form of Andrew), Carlson or Carlsen (son of Carl), Ilyin (of Ilya), Petrov (of Peter), Grigorovich (son of Grigory, Russian form of Gregory), Stefanović (son of Stefan, little Stefan), MacAllister (from "mac Alistair", meaning son of Alistair, anglicized Scottish form of Alexander) and O'Conor (from "Ó Conchobhair", meaning grandson/descendant of Conchobhar).
Carlsen is a Danish-Norwegian patronymic surname meaning "son of Carl".

Ilya

IliyaIllyaIlya / Illia / Illia
Family names in many Celtic, Germanic, Iberian, Scandinavian, Armenian and Slavic languages originate from patronyms, e.g. Wilson (son of William), FitzGerald (son of Gerald), Powell (from "ap Hywel"), Fernández (son of Fernando), Rodríguez (son of Rodrigo), Anderson or Andersen (son of Anders, Scandinavian form of Andrew), Carlson or Carlsen (son of Carl), Ilyin (of Ilya), Petrov (of Peter), Grigorovich (son of Grigory, Russian form of Gregory), Stefanović (son of Stefan, little Stefan), MacAllister (from "mac Alistair", meaning son of Alistair, anglicized Scottish form of Alexander) and O'Conor (from "Ó Conchobhair", meaning grandson/descendant of Conchobhar).
Ilya, Illia, Illya, Iliya, Il'ja, Ilija, or Ilia (Илья́ or Илия́ ; Ілля́ ) is the East Slavic form of the male Hebrew name Eliyahu (Elijah), meaning "My God is Yahu/Jah" ". It comes from the Byzantine Greek pronunciation of the vocative (Elia) of the Greek Elias . It is pronounced with stress on the second syllable. The diminutive form is Ilyusha or Ilyushenka. The Russian patronymic for a son of Ilya is "Ilyich", and a daughter is "Ilyinichna".

Patronymic surname

patronymicpatronympatriname
Patronymics are still in use, including mandatory use, in many countries worldwide, although their use has largely been replaced by or transformed into patronymic surnames.
Different cultures have different ways of producing patronymic surnames.

Surname

family nameoccupational surnamelast name
In many areas around the world, patronyms predate the use of family names.
At other times clan names and patronymics ("son of") were also common, as in Aristides Lysimachu.

IBN

In Arabic, the word "ibn" (ابن or بن: "bin", "ben" and sometimes "ibni" and "ibnu" to show the grammatical case of the noun) is the equivalent of the "-son" suffix discussed above.
ibn, patronymic ("son of") in Arabic personal names (e.g. Ibn Battuta)

Jesus

ChristJesus ChristJesus of Nazareth
In medieval times, an illegitimate child of unknown parentage would sometimes be termed "ibn Abihi", "son of his father" (notably Ziyad ibn Abihi.) In the Qur'an, Jesus (Isa in Arabic) is consistently termed "`Isa ibn Maryam" - a matronymic (in the Qur'an, Jesus has no father; see Islamic view of Jesus).
A typical Jew in Jesus' time had only one name, sometimes followed by the phrase "son of

Hebraization of surnames

HebraizedHebraizechanged his last name
There is a strong cultural pressure for immigrants to modern Israel to Hebraize their names.
This phenomenon was especially common among Ashkenazi Jews, because many such families only acquired permanent surnames (rather than patronyms) when surnames were made compulsory by the November 12, 1787 decree by the Habsburg emperor Joseph II.

Iceland

🇮🇸IcelandicISL
In Iceland, family names are unusual; Icelandic law favours the use of patronyms (and more recently, matronyms) over family names.
Rather than using family names, as is the usual custom in most Western nations, Icelanders carry patronymic or matronymic surnames, patronyms being far more commonly practiced.

Middle name

middlesecond namemiddle initial
Patronyms were sometimes employed within the English names as well by using the father's personal name as the sons' middle name.
a patronymic (e.g. Sergeyevich),

Cornish surnames

Cornish surnamesurnameCornish
Perhaps because Cornwall was legally incorporated into England earlier than Wales was, patronyms (e.g.[m]ap Ros>Rouse, [m]ap Richard>Pritchard, Davies, Evans) are less common there than toponyms (e.g. Tresillian, Trevithick, Nanskeval/Nankeville) and occupational surnames (e.g. An Gof, [An] Gove, (Blacksmith); Helyer (Cornish dialect - possibly a slater or huntsman (helgher)).
The most common surnames in Cornwall are derived from patronymics, the father’s first name being taken either without alteration, for example 'John', or with the addition of genitive '-s' or, typically Cornish, '-o', e.g. 'Bennetto' or '-y' as in 'Pawley'.

Hernández

Hernandez
Spanish patronyms follow a similar pattern to the Portuguese (e.g., López: of Lope; Hernández: of Hernán; Álvarez: of Álvaro).
Originally a patronymic, it means son of Hernando, Hernando or Fernando being the Spanish version of Germanic Ferdinand.

López

Lopez
Spanish patronyms follow a similar pattern to the Portuguese (e.g., López: of Lope; Hernández: of Hernán; Álvarez: of Álvaro).
It was originally a patronymic, meaning "Son of Lope", Lope itself being a Spanish given name deriving from Latin lupus, meaning "wolf".

Pires

For instance, Pires/Peres and Pérez are the modern forms of "Peterson" in Portuguese and Spanish.
It was originally a patronymic, meaning Son of Pedro or Son of Pero (Peter).

Yi people

YiLoloLô Lô
Yi people's sons' given names are based on the last one or two syllables of father's name.
Yi people's son's given name is patronymic, based on the last one or two syllable of father's name.

Ashkenazi Jews

AshkenaziAshkenazi JewishJewish
Permanent family surnames exist today, first by Sephardic Jews in 10th or 11th century Iberia and by Ashkenazi Jews in the late 18th century, when Austria passed the first law requiring Jews adopt surnames.
Laws were passed to integrate Jews into their host countries, forcing Ashkenazi Jews to adopt family names (they had formerly used patronymics).

Scottish Gaelic name

ScottishScottish namesGaelic name
Colloquial Scottish Gaelic also has other patronymics of a slightly different form for individuals, still in use (for more information please see: Scottish Gaelic personal naming system).
The majority of Gaelic surnames in the Highlands and western parts are patronymic in nature and of Goidelic extraction, although epithets, geography or occupation and borrowings also occur in some surnames.