Paul Steinhardt

Paul J. SteinhardtProf. Paul J. Steinhardt
Paul Joseph Steinhardt (born December 25, 1952) is an American theoretical physicist whose principal research is in cosmology and condensed matter physics.wikipedia
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Quasicrystal

quasicrystalsquasi-crystalquasicrystalline
He is also well known for his exploration of a new form of matter, known as quasicrystals.
On 25 October 2018, Luca Bindi and Paul Steinhardt were awarded the Aspen Institute 2018 Prize for collaboration and scientific research between Italy and the United States.

Andrei Linde

Andrei D. LindeAndrei Linde’sAndreï Linde
Slow-roll inflation and Generation of the seeds for galaxies: In 1982, Steinhardt and Andreas Albrecht (and, independengly, Andrei Linde) constructed the first inflationary models that could speed up the expansion of the universe enough to explain the observed smoothness and flatness of the universe and then "gracefully exit" to the more modest expansion observed today. Despite his criticisms of the idea, Steinhardt's major contributions to the inflationary theory were recognized in 2002 when he shared the Dirac Prize with Alan Guth of M.I.T. and Andrei Linde of Stanford.
Among the various awards he has received for his work on inflation, in 2002 he was awarded the Dirac Medal, along with Alan Guth of MIT and Paul Steinhardt of Princeton University.

Multiverse

parallel universesparallel universemultiversal
Neverending inflation was eventually be shown to be a generic feature of inflationary models that leads to a multiverse, the break-up of space into an infinite multitude of patches spanning an infinite range of outcomes instead of the single smooth and flat universe, as originally hoped when first proposed.
Paul Steinhardt has famously argued that no experiment can rule out a theory if the theory provides for all possible outcomes.

Eternal inflation

chaotic inflation theorychaotic inflationBubble universe theory
Eternal inflation and the multiverse: In 1982, Steinhardt presented the first example of eternal inflation.
Paul Steinhardt, one of the original architects of the inflationary model, introduced the first example of eternal inflation in 1983, and Alexander Vilenkin showed that it is generic.

Andreas Albrecht (cosmologist)

Andreas AlbrechtAndreas J. AlbrechtAndy Albrecht
Slow-roll inflation and Generation of the seeds for galaxies: In 1982, Steinhardt and Andreas Albrecht (and, independengly, Andrei Linde) constructed the first inflationary models that could speed up the expansion of the universe enough to explain the observed smoothness and flatness of the universe and then "gracefully exit" to the more modest expansion observed today.
His thesis advisor was Paul Steinhardt.

Neil Turok

Turok, Neil
Endless Universe: Beyond the Big Bang (2007), co-authored with Neil Turok, describes the early struggles in challenging the widely accepted big bang theory and the subsequent development of the bouncing or cyclic theories of the universe, which are currently being explored and tested.
Together with Justin Khoury, Burt Ovrut and Paul Steinhardt, Turok introduced the notion of the Ekpyrotic Universe, "... a cosmological model in which the hot big bang universe is produced by the collision of a brane in the bulk space with a bounding orbifold plane, beginning from an otherwise cold, vacuous, static universe".

Quintessence (physics)

quintessencedark energy
Quintessence: Working with colleagues, he subsequently introduced the concept of quintessence, a form of dark energy that varies with time.
The concept was expanded to more general types of time-varying dark energy and the term "quintessence" was first introduced in a paper by Robert R. Caldwell, Rahul Dave and Paul Steinhardt.

Alan Guth

Alan H. GuthAlan Harvey GuthGuth
Despite his criticisms of the idea, Steinhardt's major contributions to the inflationary theory were recognized in 2002 when he shared the Dirac Prize with Alan Guth of M.I.T. and Andrei Linde of Stanford.
He has won many awards and medals, including the Medal of the International Center for Theoretical Physics, Trieste, Italy, with Andrei Linde and Paul Steinhardt and the Eddington Medal in 1996, and the 2009 Isaac Newton Medal, awarded by the British Institute of Physics.

Icosahedrite

The International Mineralogical Association accepted the quasicrystal as a new mineral and designated its name, icosahedrite.
Its discovery followed a 10-year-long systematic search by an international team of scientists led by Luca Bindi and Paul J. Steinhardt to find the first natural quasicrystal.

David Spergel

David N. SpergelProf. David Spergel
Self-interacting dark matter: In 2000, David Spergel and Steinhardt first introduced the concept of strongly self-interacting dark matter (SIDM) to explain various anomalies in standard cold dark models based on assuming dark matter consists of weakly interacting massive particles (also referred to as "WIMPs")
In 2000, Spergel and his Princeton colleague Paul Steinhardt introduced the concept of strongly self-interacting dark matter (SIDM).

Peter Lu

Peter J. Lu
Peter J. Lu and Steinhardt discovered a quasicrystalline Islamic tiling on the Darb-e Imam Shrine (1453 A.D.) in Isfahan, Iran constructed from girih tiles.
As an undergraduate physics major, he wrote his fourth-year senior thesis with Prof. Paul J. Steinhardt on the search for natural quasicrystals, later published in Physical Review Letters.

Darb-e Imam

Darb-i ImamDarb-i Imam shrine
Peter J. Lu and Steinhardt discovered a quasicrystalline Islamic tiling on the Darb-e Imam Shrine (1453 A.D.) in Isfahan, Iran constructed from girih tiles.
Peter Lu and Paul Steinhardt have studied Islamic tiling patterns, called girih tiles.

Girih tiles

girihdecorative patternsGirih tilings
Peter J. Lu and Steinhardt discovered a quasicrystalline Islamic tiling on the Darb-e Imam Shrine (1453 A.D.) in Isfahan, Iran constructed from girih tiles.
In 2007, the physicists Peter J. Lu and Paul J. Steinhardt suggested that girih tilings possessed properties consistent with self-similar fractal quasicrystalline tilings such as Penrose tilings, predating them by five centuries.

Khatyrkite

The tiny specimen, a few millimeters across, had been packed away in a box labeled "khatyrkite," which is an ordinary crystal composed of copper and aluminum.
Quasicrystals were first reported in 1984 and named so by Dov Levine and Paul Steinhardt.

Inflation (cosmology)

cosmic inflationinflationcosmological inflation
Beginning in the early 1980s, Steinhardt co-authored seminal papers that helped to lay the foundations of inflationary cosmology.
In 2002, three of the original architects of the theory were recognized for their major contributions; physicists Alan Guth of M.I.T., Andrei Linde of Stanford, and Paul Steinhardt of Princeton shared the prestigious Dirac Prize "for development of the concept of inflation in cosmology".

Ekpyrotic universe

ekpyroticEkpyrotic cosmologyekpyrotic model
The original ekpyrotic model was introduced by Justin Khoury, Burt Ovrut, Paul Steinhardt and Neil Turok in 2001.

Cyclic model

oscillatory universeoscillating universecyclic multiverse
It was proposed in 2001 by Paul Steinhardt of Princeton University and Neil Turok of Cambridge University.

Katie Mack (astrophysicist)

Katie Mack
Her thesis on the early universe was supervised by Paul Steinhardt.

Dirac Medal

Dirac PrizeDirac Medal of the ICTPDirac Medal and Prize

John Scott Medal

John Scott AwardJohn Scott Legacy MedalJohn Scott Legacy Medal and Premium

Sidney Coleman

Sidney R. ColemanColeman
Steinhardt received his Bachelor of Science in Physics at Caltech in 1974, and his Ph.D. in Physics at Harvard University in 1978 where his advisor was Sidney Coleman.

Princeton University

PrincetonPrinceton CollegeCollege of New Jersey
He is currently the Albert Einstein Professor in Science at Princeton University where he is on the faculty of the Departments of Physics and Astrophysical Sciences.