Pavilion for Japanese Art

The Pavilion for Japanese Art is a part of the Los Angeles County Museum of Art containing the museum's collection of Japanese works that date from approximately 3000 BC through the 20th century.wikipedia
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Los Angeles County Museum of Art

LACMALos Angeles County MuseumLos Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA)
The Pavilion for Japanese Art is a part of the Los Angeles County Museum of Art containing the museum's collection of Japanese works that date from approximately 3000 BC through the 20th century.
The museum's Pavilion for Japanese Art, designed by maverick architect Bruce Goff, opened in 1988, as did the B. Gerald Cantor Sculpture Garden of Rodin bronzes.

Bruce Goff

Bruce A. Goff
The building itself was designed by renowned architect Bruce Goff.

Bart Prince

Goff's original design was translated into working drawings for LACMA by his former associate, Bart Prince.
Prince worked closely with Bruce Goff as associate architects on the Pavilion for Japanese Art in Los Angeles from 1978 to 1988.

Japanese art

Japaneseartarts
The Pavilion for Japanese Art is a part of the Los Angeles County Museum of Art containing the museum's collection of Japanese works that date from approximately 3000 BC through the 20th century.

30th century BC

3000 BC30th3,000 BC
The Pavilion for Japanese Art is a part of the Los Angeles County Museum of Art containing the museum's collection of Japanese works that date from approximately 3000 BC through the 20th century.

20th century

twentieth century20th20th centuries
The Pavilion for Japanese Art is a part of the Los Angeles County Museum of Art containing the museum's collection of Japanese works that date from approximately 3000 BC through the 20th century.

Archaeology

archaeologistarchaeologicalarchaeologists
Archaeological artifacts, Buddhist and Shinto sculpture, ceramics, lacquer ware, textiles, cloisonné, and armor are on display on the second level of the Pavilion's West Wing.

Buddhism

BuddhistBuddhistsBuddhadharma
Archaeological artifacts, Buddhist and Shinto sculpture, ceramics, lacquer ware, textiles, cloisonné, and armor are on display on the second level of the Pavilion's West Wing.

Shinto

ShintoismShintōShintoist
Archaeological artifacts, Buddhist and Shinto sculpture, ceramics, lacquer ware, textiles, cloisonné, and armor are on display on the second level of the Pavilion's West Wing.

Cloisonné

cloisonnecloisonné enamelsenkschmelz
Archaeological artifacts, Buddhist and Shinto sculpture, ceramics, lacquer ware, textiles, cloisonné, and armor are on display on the second level of the Pavilion's West Wing.

Edo period

Tokugawa periodEdo-periodEdo
The museum's collection includes traditional woodblock prints from the Edo period (1615–1868), as well as a large number of prints from the Meiji period (1868–1912), Taishō period (1912–1926), and the Shōwa period (1926–1989).

Meiji (era)

Meiji periodMeiji eraMeiji
The museum's collection includes traditional woodblock prints from the Edo period (1615–1868), as well as a large number of prints from the Meiji period (1868–1912), Taishō period (1912–1926), and the Shōwa period (1926–1989).

Taishō

Taishō periodTaishō eraTaishō democracy
The museum's collection includes traditional woodblock prints from the Edo period (1615–1868), as well as a large number of prints from the Meiji period (1868–1912), Taishō period (1912–1926), and the Shōwa period (1926–1989).

Shōwa (1926–1989)

Shōwa periodShōwaShōwa era
The museum's collection includes traditional woodblock prints from the Edo period (1615–1868), as well as a large number of prints from the Meiji period (1868–1912), Taishō period (1912–1926), and the Shōwa period (1926–1989).

Rinpa school

RimpaRinpaRimpa school
The exhibition space in the Pavilion's East Wing displays a rotating selection of screens and hanging scrolls from the Edo period, including works from the Rimpa, ukiyo-e, and Maruyama-Shijo schools as well as spontaneous creations made by Zen monks.

Ukiyo-e

Japanese printsJapanese woodblock printsUkiyoe
The exhibition space in the Pavilion's East Wing displays a rotating selection of screens and hanging scrolls from the Edo period, including works from the Rimpa, ukiyo-e, and Maruyama-Shijo schools as well as spontaneous creations made by Zen monks.

Shijō school

Maruyama schoolMaruyama-Shijō schoolMaruyama-Shijo school
The exhibition space in the Pavilion's East Wing displays a rotating selection of screens and hanging scrolls from the Edo period, including works from the Rimpa, ukiyo-e, and Maruyama-Shijo schools as well as spontaneous creations made by Zen monks.

Zen

Zen BuddhismZen BuddhistChan
The exhibition space in the Pavilion's East Wing displays a rotating selection of screens and hanging scrolls from the Edo period, including works from the Rimpa, ukiyo-e, and Maruyama-Shijo schools as well as spontaneous creations made by Zen monks.

Netsuke

Japanese Netsukes
This gallery provides visitors with a 360-degree view of the miniature sculptures known as netsuke.

Counterweight

counterbalancecounterbalancedcounterbalancing
In traditional Japan, netsuke were used as toggles and counterweights for suspending tobacco pouches and inro from the sash of men's kimonos.

Tobacco

tobacco leavessnufftobacco leaf
In traditional Japan, netsuke were used as toggles and counterweights for suspending tobacco pouches and inro from the sash of men's kimonos.

Inrō

inro
In traditional Japan, netsuke were used as toggles and counterweights for suspending tobacco pouches and inro from the sash of men's kimonos.

Kimono

kimonosuchikakejinbaori
In traditional Japan, netsuke were used as toggles and counterweights for suspending tobacco pouches and inro from the sash of men's kimonos.

Transparency and translucency

translucenttransparenttransparency
Designed by Bruce Goff, the 32,100-square-foot building is notable for its translucent fiberglass panels, which allow paintings to be lit safely and naturally by soft sunlight.

Fiberglass

fibreglassglass-reinforced plasticGRP
Designed by Bruce Goff, the 32,100-square-foot building is notable for its translucent fiberglass panels, which allow paintings to be lit safely and naturally by soft sunlight.