A report on Pectoral cross

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Cardinal Patabendige Don of Colombo wearing a pectoral cross suspended by a cord while in choir dress
Pectoral Cross of Archbishop Paciano Aniceto of the Philippines made from Philippine Native Bamboo.
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Cross that is worn on the chest, usually suspended from the neck by a cord or chain.

- Pectoral cross
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Bishop in choir dress with train

Choir dress

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Traditional vesture of the clerics, seminarians and religious of Christian churches worn for public prayer and the administration of the sacraments except when celebrating or concelebrating the Eucharist.

Traditional vesture of the clerics, seminarians and religious of Christian churches worn for public prayer and the administration of the sacraments except when celebrating or concelebrating the Eucharist.

Bishop in choir dress with train
Choir dress of a Cistercian nun: a long white cowl
Norbertine abbot in white prelate choir dress, 18th century
Monsingnor Herrincx in Franciscan brown prelate choir dress
Benedictine Abbot Schober in black prelate choir dress and black fur cappa magna
Roman Catholic secular canons in choir dress: cassock, rochet, mozzetta, and pectoral cross on chain.
Monsignor Gilles Wach in the blue choir dress of the ICKSP
Saint John (Maximovich) wearing choir dress of an Orthodox bishop: klobuk, outer riassa, Panagia, and episcopal mandyas; holding his paterissa (crozier).
Syriac Orthodox Patriarch of Antioch, Ignatius Zakka I Iwas (in red cassock) and a priest (in black).
An Anglican priest delivers a homily, dressed in choir habit with Canterbury cap
An Anglican priest in choir dress: cassock, surplice and tippet. The dark red of his academic hood can be seen on his shoulders.
An Anglican bishop in choir dress: purple cassock, rochet, red chimere and cuffs, tippet, and pectoral cross.

Bishops wear the above-mentioned purple cassock with scarlet piping, and add a pectoral cross suspended from a green and gold cord, a mozzetta over the rochet, and a purple zucchetto under the biretta.

Clergy of various ranks in vestments at a Mass according to the Neo-Gallican Rite of Versailles Elevation of the chalice.

Vestment

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Vestments are liturgical garments and articles associated primarily with the Christian religion, especially by Eastern Churches, Catholics (of all rites), Anglicans, and Lutherans.

Vestments are liturgical garments and articles associated primarily with the Christian religion, especially by Eastern Churches, Catholics (of all rites), Anglicans, and Lutherans.

Clergy of various ranks in vestments at a Mass according to the Neo-Gallican Rite of Versailles Elevation of the chalice.
Illustration of liturgical garments from Acta Eruditorum, 1713
Renaissance styled vestments which is used by the Catholic clergy: A chasuble, dalmatic, cope, and a biretta
Gold-embroidered epitrachilion (stole) dating from 1600, in the Benaki Museum, Athens
Gold pectoral cross from Italy or subalpine regions, late 6th century–7th century
This Lutheran pastor is wearing a Geneva gown and Preaching Bands
A bishop blessing with dikirion and trikirion upon being vested
A priest between two deacons praying the Cherubikon
Archbishop John (Maximovich) wearing an episcopal mantle.
An Eastern Catholic bishop of the Syro-Malabar Church along with other priests
An Armenian priest (at the right)

Pectoral cross : A large cross worn on a chain or necklace around the neck by clergy of many Christian denominations. In some traditions it is associated with bishops. In the Roman Catholic tradition it is only worn by bishops, abbots, and certain canons who are granted the use of the pectoral cross by special indult. In choir dress the cross is gold with a green rope, red for cardinals. In house dress, it is silver with a silver chain.

On the right, an example of the full collar shirt and cassock; on the left, a clerical shirt that could have a tab collar inserted.

Clerical clothing

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Non-liturgical clothing worn exclusively by clergy.

Non-liturgical clothing worn exclusively by clergy.

On the right, an example of the full collar shirt and cassock; on the left, a clerical shirt that could have a tab collar inserted.
The rabat, worn until the early 20th century.
The ruff, as worn by a Danish Lutheran bishop

Along with the pectoral cross and episcopal ring, this marks them off from other clergy in appearance.

Crucifixion of Christ at the winged triptych at the Church of the Teutonic Order in Vienna, Austria. Woodcarvings by an anonymous master; polychromy by Jan van Wavere, Mechelen, signed 1520. This altarpiece was originally made for St. Mary's Church, Gdańsk, and came to Vienna in 1864.

Crucifix

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Cross with an image of Jesus on it, as distinct from a bare cross.

Cross with an image of Jesus on it, as distinct from a bare cross.

Crucifixion of Christ at the winged triptych at the Church of the Teutonic Order in Vienna, Austria. Woodcarvings by an anonymous master; polychromy by Jan van Wavere, Mechelen, signed 1520. This altarpiece was originally made for St. Mary's Church, Gdańsk, and came to Vienna in 1864.
A crucifix in the chancel of a Lutheran church.
Lutherans retained the use of the crucifix; depicted is Martin Luther Church in Oberwiesenthal, Germany
A handheld crucifix
A crucifix in a church, with votive candles.
Russian Orthodox crucifix, brass
Russian Orthodox crucifix, 19th - early 20th century
Orthodox crucifix in Vilnius
Crucifix, ca. 1795–1862, Brooklyn Museum
Lutheran crucifix with the portrait of Luther at Saint George's church in Immeldorf, Lichtenau
A large crucifix at Gereja Santa, Jakarta, Indonesia
A post–World War II crucifix in a courtroom in Nuremberg, Germany
A crucifix overlooks a fountain at the Anglican Shrine of Our Lady of Walsingham
Pulpit crucifix at the Canterbury Cathedral
Altar of Christ Church Cathedral, Oxford
Crucifix at the Cathedral of St. John the Baptist

More sculptural small crucifixes in metal relief are also used in Orthodoxy (see gallery examples), including as pectoral crosses and blessing crosses.

Vesting prayers

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Vesting prayers are prayers which are spoken while a cleric puts on vestments as part of a liturgy, in both the Eastern and Western churches.

Vesting prayers are prayers which are spoken while a cleric puts on vestments as part of a liturgy, in both the Eastern and Western churches.

He takes the Pectoral cross, saying:

Cross necklace made of steel

Cross necklace

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Any necklace featuring a Christian cross or crucifix.

Any necklace featuring a Christian cross or crucifix.

Cross necklace made of steel
Canadian actress Tricia Helfer wearing a cross necklace
American singer Cassie Ventura wearing a cross necklace
A cross necklace hanging from the rear-view mirror of a car
A man with three different cross necklaces
Belarusian-Russian singer Bianka wearing a cross necklace of the crucifix variant
A cross pendant with double-headed eagle, made in Poland in the late 17th century
German skier Jens Filbrich wearing a cross necklace
Swedish model Mini Andén wearing a cross necklace
A cross necklace of the Daughters of Charity of Saint Vincent de Paul religious order
D-Crunch wearing a cross necklace
Indian actress Celina Jaitley wearing a cross necklace
Russian tennis player Maria Sharapova wearing a cross necklace
Green-coloured cross necklace
Eastern Orthodox Christian cross necklace made of wood
Toofan wearing a cross necklace
German singer Lena Meyer-Landrut wearing a cross necklace of the ecumenical Christian Taizé Community
Polish entrepreneur Miriam Shaded wearing a cross necklace
Russian president Vladimir Putin wearing a cross necklace

Many Christian bishops of various denominations, such as the Orthodox Church, wear a pectoral cross as a sign of their order.

The coat of arms of a cardinal (who is a bishop) is indicated by a red galero (wide-brimmed hat) with 15 tassels on each side (the motto and escutcheon are proper to the individual cardinal).

Cardinal (Catholic Church)

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Senior member of the clergy of the Catholic Church.

Senior member of the clergy of the Catholic Church.

The coat of arms of a cardinal (who is a bishop) is indicated by a red galero (wide-brimmed hat) with 15 tassels on each side (the motto and escutcheon are proper to the individual cardinal).
Cardinal Richelieu, chief minister of France
Cardinal Innitzer, Archbishop of Vienna and Cardinal-Priest of San Crisogono
Choir dress of a cardinal
Cardinal Sodano (1927-2022), Dean Emeritus of the college
Cardinal-priest Thomas Wolsey
Coat of arms of Cardinal Martino, current Cardinal Protodeacon
Reginald Pole was a cardinal for 18 years before he was ordained a priest.
A Cardinal in Profile, 1880, by Jehan Georges Vibert (Morgan Library and Museum, New York City)
alt=Théodore Adrien Cardinal  Sarr with a ferraiolo, and wearing a red cassock, but not the rest of the choir dress.|Cardinal Sarr with a ferraiolo and wearing a red cassock, but not the rest of the choir dress.
alt=Cardinals Walter Kasper (left) and Godfried Danneels (right) wearing their choir dress: scarlet (red) cassock, white rochet trimmed with lace, scarlet mozetta, scarlet biretta (over the usual scarlet zucchetto), and pectoral cross on cord.|Cardinals Walter Kasper (left) and Godfried Danneels (right) wearing their choir dress: scarlet (red) cassock, white rochet trimmed with lace, scarlet mozetta, scarlet biretta (over the usual scarlet zucchetto), and pectoral cross on cord.
alt=Tarcisio Cardinal Bertone in dress for hot tropical countries (white cassock with scarlet piping and buttons).|Cardinal Bertone in dress for hot tropical countries (white cassock with scarlet piping and buttons).

A cardinal who is not a bishop is entitled to wear and use the episcopal vestments and other pontificalia (episcopal regalia: mitre, crozier, zucchetto, pectoral cross, and ring).

Eufemia Szaniawska, Abbess of the Benedictine Monastery in Nieśwież with a crosier, c. 1768, National Museum in Warsaw

Abbess

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Abbess is the female superior of a community of nuns, which is often an abbey.

Abbess is the female superior of a community of nuns, which is often an abbey.

Eufemia Szaniawska, Abbess of the Benedictine Monastery in Nieśwież with a crosier, c. 1768, National Museum in Warsaw
Princess Maria Theresia Isabella of Austria, a noble abbess with her crosier.

The abbess also traditionally adds a pectoral cross to the outside of her habit as a symbol of office, though she continues to wear a modified form of her religious habit or dress, as she is unordained—females cannot be ordained—and so does not vest or use choir dress in the liturgy.

An Eastern Catholic bishop of the Syro-Malabar Church along with other priests

Pontifical vestments

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Pontifical vestments, also referred to as episcopal vestments or pontificals, are the liturgical vestments worn by bishops (and by concession some other prelates) in the Catholic, Eastern Orthodox, Oriental Orthodox, Anglican, and some Lutheran churches, in addition to the usual priestly vestments for the celebration of the mass, other sacraments, sacramentals, and canonical hours.

Pontifical vestments, also referred to as episcopal vestments or pontificals, are the liturgical vestments worn by bishops (and by concession some other prelates) in the Catholic, Eastern Orthodox, Oriental Orthodox, Anglican, and some Lutheran churches, in addition to the usual priestly vestments for the celebration of the mass, other sacraments, sacramentals, and canonical hours.

An Eastern Catholic bishop of the Syro-Malabar Church along with other priests
A Byzantine Rite bishop blessing with dikirion and trikirion upon being vested

pectoral cross

13th-century Great Panagia from Yaroslavl.

Panagia

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One of the titles of Mary, mother of Jesus, used especially in Eastern Catholicism and Orthodox Christianity.

One of the titles of Mary, mother of Jesus, used especially in Eastern Catholicism and Orthodox Christianity.

13th-century Great Panagia from Yaroslavl.
18th-century Byzantine-style bronze panagia from Jerusalem
Saint Patriarch Tikhon in monastic habit with panagia and engolpion of Jesus
The particles placed on the diskos during the Divine Liturgy. The large cube is the Lamb, the triangle to the left is the particle for the Theotokos taken out of the Panagia.

When an Orthodox bishop is vested for the Divine Liturgy or another service, he wears a panagia and a pectoral cross over his other vestments.