Peelite

PeelitesLiberal ConservativesPeelite ConservativePeelite Conservatives
The Peelites were a breakaway dissident political faction of the British Conservative Party from 1846 to 1859.wikipedia
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Robert Peel

Sir Robert PeelPeelSir Robert Peel, 2nd Baronet
Initially led by Robert Peel, the former Prime Minister and Conservative Party leader in 1846, the Peelites supported Free Trade whilst the bulk of the Conservative Party remained protectionist.
Peel remained an influential MP and leader of the Peelite faction until his death in 1850.

Liberal Party (UK)

LiberalLiberal PartyLiberals
The Peelites later merged with the Whigs and Radicals to form the Liberal Party in 1859.
The party arose from an alliance of Whigs and free trade-supporting Peelites and the reformist Radicals in the 1850s.

Radicals (UK)

RadicalRadicalsEnglish Radical
The Peelites later merged with the Whigs and Radicals to form the Liberal Party in 1859.
By 1859, the Radicals had come together with the Whigs and the anti-protectionist Tory Peelites to form the Liberal Party, though with the New Radicalism of figures like Joseph Chamberlain they continued to have a distinctive political influence into the closing years of the nineteenth century.

1847 United Kingdom general election

18471847 general election1847 election
The Peelites numbered about a third of the old Conservative party following the 1847 general election.
However, the split among the Conservatives between the majority of Protectionists, led by Lord Stanley, and the minority of free traders, known also as the Peelites, led by former prime minister Sir Robert Peel, left the Whigs, led by Prime Minister Lord John Russell, in a position to continue in government.

Benjamin Disraeli

DisraeliLord BeaconsfieldBenjamin Disraeli, 1st Earl of Beaconsfield
The Peelites were often called the Liberal Conservatives in contrast to Protectionist Conservatives led by Benjamin Disraeli and Edward Smith-Stanley, 14th Earl of Derby. The split had been so bitter on a personal level, with attacks on Peel by Protectionist Conservatives such as Lord George Bentinck and Benjamin Disraeli, that the Conservative Party was unable to reconcile the Peelites even after the Conservatives officially abandoned protection in 1852.
An alliance of free-trade Conservatives (the "Peelites"), Radicals, and Whigs carried repeal, and the Conservative Party split: the Peelites moved towards the Whigs, while a "new" Conservative Party formed around the protectionists, led by Disraeli, Bentinck, and Lord Stanley (later Lord Derby).

George Hamilton-Gordon, 4th Earl of Aberdeen

Lord AberdeenEarl of AberdeenThe Earl of Aberdeen
In that same year, George Hamilton-Gordon, 4th Earl of Aberdeen was invited by Queen Victoria to form a coalition government with the Whigs and the Radicals.
George Hamilton-Gordon, 4th Earl of Aberdeen, (28 January 1784 – 14 December 1860), styled Lord Haddo from 1791 to 1801, was a British statesman, diplomat and Scottish landowner, successively a Tory, Conservative and Peelite politician and specialist in foreign affairs.

William Ewart Gladstone

GladstoneWilliam GladstoneW. E. Gladstone
The party further lost cohesion with some members including William Ewart Gladstone, Sir James Graham, 2nd Baronet and Sidney Herbert, 1st Baron Herbert of Lea accepting cabinet posts in the new government led by Viscount Palmerston only to resign a few weeks later when the government agreed to hold a commission on the conduct of the recent war.
Gladstone served as a minister in both of Peel's governments, and in 1846 joined the breakaway Peelite faction, which eventually merged into the new Liberal Party in 1859.

Conservative Party (UK)

ConservativeConservative PartyConservatives
The Peelites were a breakaway dissident political faction of the British Conservative Party from 1846 to 1859.

1852 United Kingdom general election

18521852 general electiongeneral election in July 1852
In the 1852 general election, the number of Peelites was estimated at around 40.
However, a split between Protectionist Tories, led by the Earl of Derby, and the Peelites who supported Lord Aberdeen made the formation of a majority government very difficult.

Edward Smith-Stanley, 14th Earl of Derby

Lord DerbyEarl of DerbyLord Stanley
The Peelites were often called the Liberal Conservatives in contrast to Protectionist Conservatives led by Benjamin Disraeli and Edward Smith-Stanley, 14th Earl of Derby. In June 1859 they agreed to combine with the Whigs, the Radicals and the Independent Irish Party Members of the United Kingdom Parliament to bring down the Conservative government of Edward Smith-Stanley, 14th Earl of Derby.
Although the Whigs actually won fewer seats—292 seats—there were several small groups in Parliament that might be willing to side with the Whigs on particular issues, including the 38 Conservative members of Parliament who were Peelites, who had already joined with the Whigs in June 1846 to repeal the Corn Laws; the 113 members who were Free Traders and who were interested in eliminating all tariffs on consumer goods; and the 63 members of the Irish Brigade who were interested in the independence of Ireland and Tenant's Rights for Irish tenants.

Henry John Temple, 3rd Viscount Palmerston

Lord PalmerstonPalmerstonThe Viscount Palmerston
The party further lost cohesion with some members including William Ewart Gladstone, Sir James Graham, 2nd Baronet and Sidney Herbert, 1st Baron Herbert of Lea accepting cabinet posts in the new government led by Viscount Palmerston only to resign a few weeks later when the government agreed to hold a commission on the conduct of the recent war.
Palmerston became Home Secretary in Aberdeen's coalition government, in 1852, subsequent to the Peelite advocacy of the appointment of Lord John Russell to the office of Foreign Secretary.

Whigs (British political party)

WhigWhigsWhig Party
The Peelites later merged with the Whigs and Radicals to form the Liberal Party in 1859.
The Liberal Party (the term was first used officially in 1868, but had been used colloquially for decades beforehand) arose from a coalition of Whigs, free trade Tory followers of Robert Peel and free trade Radicals, first created, tenuously under the Peelite Earl of Aberdeen in 1852 and put together more permanently under the former Canningite Tory Lord Palmerston in 1859.

John Russell, 1st Earl Russell

Lord John RussellLord RussellJohn Russell
Peel was able to carry the repeal vote in the House of Commons, but only at the price of splitting the Conservative Party, a split which led to the fall of Peel's government in June 1846 and its replacement by a Whig government led by John Russell, 1st Earl Russell.
Russell, as the leader of the Whig party, then brought it into a new coalition government with the Peelite Conservatives, headed by the Peelite Lord Aberdeen.

Lord George Bentinck

George BentinckBentinck Benevolent FundGeorge
The split had been so bitter on a personal level, with attacks on Peel by Protectionist Conservatives such as Lord George Bentinck and Benjamin Disraeli, that the Conservative Party was unable to reconcile the Peelites even after the Conservatives officially abandoned protection in 1852.
The Conservative Party broke in half; some hundred free-trade Peelites followed Peel, while 230 protectionists formed the new Conservative Party, with Stanley (later the Earl of Derby) as overall leader.

Corn Laws

Corn Lawrepeal of the Corn LawsImportation Act 1815
Facing a serious famine in Ireland in 1845, the Peelites sought to lower food prices by repealing the Corn Laws.
Those Conservatives who were loyal to Peel were known as the Peelites and included the Earl of Aberdeen and William Ewart Gladstone.

Liberalism in the United Kingdom

liberalLiberalismBritish
Historically, the term referred to the broad liberal political alliance of the nineteenth century, formed by Whigs, Peelites, and radicals.

Independent Irish Party

Ind. IrishIndependent IrishIrish Brigade
In June 1859 they agreed to combine with the Whigs, the Radicals and the Independent Irish Party Members of the United Kingdom Parliament to bring down the Conservative government of Edward Smith-Stanley, 14th Earl of Derby.
It brought down Lord Derby's Tory ministry and enabled the leader of the Peelites Lord Aberdeen and Whigs to form a coalition government.

1859 United Kingdom general election

18591859 general election1859 election
The Peelites finally disappeared as a distinctive political faction after the 1859 general election.
Despite making overall gains, Derby's government was defeated in a confidence vote by an alliance of the Whigs, led by Lord Palmerston and other political groupings including the Peelites, Radicals and the Irish Brigade.

1857 United Kingdom general election

18571857 general electiongeneral election
In the 1857 general election, their numbers further decreased to around 26, or maybe less than 20 as identifying who was and who was not a Peelite became increasingly difficult.
There is no separate tally of votes or seats for the Peelites.

Sir James Graham, 2nd Baronet

Sir James GrahamJames GrahamSir James Graham, Bt
The party further lost cohesion with some members including William Ewart Gladstone, Sir James Graham, 2nd Baronet and Sidney Herbert, 1st Baron Herbert of Lea accepting cabinet posts in the new government led by Viscount Palmerston only to resign a few weeks later when the government agreed to hold a commission on the conduct of the recent war.
Those Conservatives who were loyal to Peel became known as the Peelites, they included Graham, the Earl of Aberdeen and William Ewart Gladstone.

Dissident

dissidentspolitical dissidentdissidence
The Peelites were a breakaway dissident political faction of the British Conservative Party from 1846 to 1859.

Political faction

factionfactionsfactionalism
The Peelites were a breakaway dissident political faction of the British Conservative Party from 1846 to 1859.

Prime Minister of the United Kingdom

Prime MinisterBritish Prime MinisterPrime Minister of Great Britain
Initially led by Robert Peel, the former Prime Minister and Conservative Party leader in 1846, the Peelites supported Free Trade whilst the bulk of the Conservative Party remained protectionist.

Free trade

trade liberalizationfree-tradetrade liberalisation
Initially led by Robert Peel, the former Prime Minister and Conservative Party leader in 1846, the Peelites supported Free Trade whilst the bulk of the Conservative Party remained protectionist.

Great Famine (Ireland)

Great FamineIrish Potato FamineGreat Irish Famine
Facing a serious famine in Ireland in 1845, the Peelites sought to lower food prices by repealing the Corn Laws.