Peerage of England

peerEnglish peerEnglandpeerageEnglish peeragepeersEnglishnoblemanEnglish noblemanpeer of England
The Peerage of England comprises all peerages created in the Kingdom of England before the Act of Union in 1707.wikipedia
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Peerage of Great Britain

Great Britainpeeragepeer
In that year, the Peerages of England and Scotland were replaced by one Peerage of Great Britain.
It replaced the Peerage of England and the Peerage of Scotland until it was itself replaced by the Peerage of the United Kingdom in 1801.

Earl of Arundel

Earl of Arundel (1138)Earls of Arundelearldom of Arundel
In the following table, each peer is listed only by his or her highest English title (with the exception of the Duke of Norfolk/Earl of Arundel) showing higher or equal titles in the other peerages.
Earl of Arundel is a title of nobility in England, and the oldest extant in the English peerage.

Duke of Cornwall

Duke of Cornwall (1337)Dukedom of CornwallDukes of Cornwall
Duke of Cornwall is a title in the Peerage of England, traditionally held by the eldest son of the reigning British monarch, previously the English monarch.

House of Lords

LordsBritish House of LordsThe House of Lords
English Peeresses obtained their first seats in the House of Lords under the Peerage Act 1963 from which date until the passage of the House of Lords Act 1999 all Peers of England could sit in the House of Lords.
During the reign of Edward II's successor, Edward III, Parliament clearly separated into two distinct chambers: the House of Commons (consisting of the shire and borough representatives) and the House of Lords (consisting of the bishops, abbots and peers).

Peerage of Scotland

Scottish peerpeerScottish peerage
In that year, the Peerages of England and Scotland were replaced by one Peerage of Great Britain.

Duke of Richmond

Dukes of RichmondRichmond1st Duke of Richmond
Duke of Richmond is a title in the Peerage of England that has been created four times in British history.

Peerage Act 1963

disclaimedPeerage Act1963
English Peeresses obtained their first seats in the House of Lords under the Peerage Act 1963 from which date until the passage of the House of Lords Act 1999 all Peers of England could sit in the House of Lords.
The Act only applies to titles held in the Peerage of England, the Peerage of Scotland, the Peerage of Great Britain, and the Peerage of the United Kingdom.

Duke of Devonshire

Dukes of DevonshireMarquess of HartingtonDevonshire
Duke of Devonshire is a title in the Peerage of England held by members of the Cavendish family.

Duke of Marlborough (title)

Duke of MarlboroughDukes of MarlboroughDukedom of Marlborough
Duke of Marlborough is a title in the Peerage of England.

Duke of Bedford

Dukes of BedfordMarquess of TavistockBedford
Duke of Bedford (named after Bedford, England) is a title that has been created six times (for five distinct people) in the Peerage of England.

Duke

DuchessducalDukes
The ranks of the English peerage are, in descending order, Duke, Marquess, Earl, Viscount, and Baron.
Currently, there are thirty-five dukedoms in the Peerage of England, Peerage of Scotland, Peerage of Great Britain, Peerage of Ireland and Peerage of the United Kingdom, held by thirty different people, as three people hold two dukedoms and one holds three (see List of dukes in the peerages of Britain and Ireland).

Earl of Derby

Earls of DerbyLord DerbyEarl of Derby (1485)
Earl of Derby is a title in the Peerage of England.

Earl of Huntingdon

Earl of Huntingdon (1529)Earldom of HuntingdonEarl of Huntington (1529)
Earl of Huntingdon is a title which has been created several times in the Peerage of England.

Earl of Pembroke

Earls of PembrokeEarl of Pembroke (1551)Earldom of Pembroke
The Earldom of Pembroke (Iarllaeth Penfro) is a title in the Peerage of England that was first created in the 12th century by King Stephen of England.

Duke of Norfolk

Dukes of NorfolkDukedom of NorfolkDuke of Norfolk (1483)
In the following table, each peer is listed only by his or her highest English title (with the exception of the Duke of Norfolk/Earl of Arundel) showing higher or equal titles in the other peerages.
The Duke of Norfolk is the premier duke in the peerage of England, and also, as Earl of Arundel, the premier earl.

Earl of Devon

Earls of DevonEarl of Devon (1553)Earl of Devon (1141)
The title of Earl of Devon was created several times in the English peerage, and was possessed first (after the Norman Conquest of 1066) by the de Redvers (alias de Reviers, Revieres, etc.) family, and later by the Courtenays.

Earl of Lincoln

Earl of Lincoln (1572)Earl of Lincoln (1217)Earls of Lincoln
Earl of Lincoln is a title that has been created eight times in the Peerage of England, most recently in 1534.

Earl of Suffolk

Earl of Suffolk (1603)Earl of BindonEarls of Suffolk
Earl of Suffolk is a title that has been created four times in the Peerage of England.

Earl of Montgomery

Earl of Montgomery (1605)Montgomeryand Montgomery
The title Earl of Montgomery (pronounced "Mun-gum-ery") was created in the Peerage of England in 1605 for Sir Philip Herbert, younger son of the 2nd Earl of Pembroke.

Marquess of Exeter

Earl of ExeterEarl of Exeter (1605)Baron Burghley (1571)
Marquess of Exeter is a title that has been created twice, once in the Peerage of England and once in the Peerage of the United Kingdom.

Earl of Berkshire

Earl of Berkshire (1626)Baron Howard of CharltonEarl of Berkshire (1626 creation)
Earl of Berkshire is a title that has been created twice in the Peerage of England.

Peerage

peerpeerspeeress
The Peerage of England comprises all peerages created in the Kingdom of England before the Act of Union in 1707.

Marquess of Northampton

Marquess of Northampton (1547)Marquis of NorthamptonEarl Compton
Marquess of Northampton is a title that has been created twice, firstly in the Peerage of England (1547), then secondly in the Peerage of the United Kingdom (1812).

Duke of St Albans

Duke of St. AlbansEarl of BurfordAubrey Beauclerk, 7th Duke of St Albans
Duke of St Albans is a title in the Peerage of England.

Earl of Denbigh

Earl of Denbigh (1622)William Feilding, 5th Earl of DenbighEarls of Denbigh
Earl of Denbigh (pronounced "Denby") is a title in the Peerage of England.