Pelorosaurus

ColossosaurusPelorosaurus conybeareiPelorosaurus humerocristatus
Pelorosaurus (meaning "monstrous lizard") is a genus of titanosauriform sauropod dinosaur.wikipedia
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Cetiosaurus

cetiosaurCetiosaurus oxoniensisRutland Dinosaur
Richard Owen had discovered Cetiosaurus in 1841 but had incorrectly identified it as a gigantic sea-going crocodile-like reptile.
This conclusion, if correct, would cause considerable taxonomic instability, because the genus Pelorosaurus had since been based on its fossils, and recognized as a totally different kind of sauropod.

Hastings Beds

Hastings GroupHastings Beds GroupHastings Bed Group
Some of these, four caudal vertebrae, BMNH R2544–2547, and three chevrons, BMNH R2548–2550, found around 1825 by John Kingdon near Cuckfield in the Tunbridge Wells Sand Formation of the Hastings Beds, belonged to sauropods.

Oplosaurus

Oplosaurus armatus
It is known from a single tooth usually referred to the contemporaneous "wastebasket taxon" Pelorosaurus, although there is no solid evidence for this.

Haestasaurus

This specimen has since been made the new genus Haestasaurus.
The same year, Mantell in a lecture named the find as a second species of Pelorosaurus: Pelorosaurus becklesii, the specific name honouring Beckles.

Neosodon

Neosodon praecursor
Often in the past, it had been assigned to the wastebasket taxon Pelorosaurus, but restudy has suggested that it could be related to Turiasaurus, a roughly-contemporaneous giant Spanish sauropod.

Ischyrosaurus

Ischyrosaurus manseliIschyrosaurus" ''manseli
It was once synonymized with the Early Cretaceous-age Pelorosaurus.

Dinodocus

Dinodocus mackesoni
mackesoni, a name given to some fossil limb bones from the Lower Greensand (Lower Cretaceous) of Kent, England, was formerly placed in the genus Pelorosaurus (Mantell, 1850), but review by Upchurch et al. (2004) concludes that Dinodocus is a nomen dubium''.

Gigantosaurus

Gigantosaurus megalonyx
It was synonymised to Ornithopsis humerocristatus by Richard Lydekker in 1888 and to Pelorosaurus by Friedrich von Huene in 1909.

Duriatitan

Cetiosaurus humerocristatusDuriatitan humerocristatusPelorosaurus humerocristatus'' (Duriatitan)

Brachiosaurus

Brachiosaurus altithoraxBrachiosaurus" nougarediBrachiosaurus nougaredi
That group being still very incompletely known however, it proved difficult to determine its more precise affinities, with the Atlantosauridae, Cardiodontidae, Cetiosauridae and Morosauridae being suggested until in 1927 von Huene understood the possible link with Brachiosaurus, placing Pelorosaurus in the Brachiosauridae, a placement followed by subsequent authors until the early 21st century.
fraasi in 1914, Janensch observed that the unique elongation of the humerus was shared by all three Brachiosaurus species as well as the British Pelorosaurus''.

Sauropoda

sauropodsauropodseusauropod
Pelorosaurus (meaning "monstrous lizard") is a genus of titanosauriform sauropod dinosaur.
He assigned these specimens to the new genus Pelorosaurus, and grouped it together with the dinosaurs.

Macronaria

titanosauriformTitanosauriformesmacronarian
Pelorosaurus (meaning "monstrous lizard") is a genus of titanosauriform sauropod dinosaur.

Cretaceous

Cretaceous PeriodMiddle CretaceousEarly Cretaceous
Remains referred to Pelorosaurus date from the Early Cretaceous period, about 140-125 million years ago, and have been found in England and Portugal.

England

🏴󠁧󠁢󠁥󠁮󠁧󠁿󠁧󠁢󠁥󠁮󠁧󠁿EnglishENG
Remains referred to Pelorosaurus date from the Early Cretaceous period, about 140-125 million years ago, and have been found in England and Portugal.

Portugal

PortuguesePortuguese RepublicPOR
Remains referred to Pelorosaurus date from the Early Cretaceous period, about 140-125 million years ago, and have been found in England and Portugal.

Richard Owen

OwenSir Richard OwenProfessor Owen
Richard Owen had discovered Cetiosaurus in 1841 but had incorrectly identified it as a gigantic sea-going crocodile-like reptile.

Michael P. Taylor

Mike P. TaylorMike TaylorTaylor
The taxonomic history of Pelorosaurus and Cetiosaurus, as noted by reviewers including Michael P. Taylor and Darren Naish, is highly confusing.

Darren Naish

NaishTetrapod Zoology
The taxonomic history of Pelorosaurus and Cetiosaurus, as noted by reviewers including Michael P. Taylor and Darren Naish, is highly confusing.

Cuckfield

Cuckfield, West SussexCuckfield, SussexCuckfield Grammar School
Some of these, four caudal vertebrae, BMNH R2544–2547, and three chevrons, BMNH R2548–2550, found around 1825 by John Kingdon near Cuckfield in the Tunbridge Wells Sand Formation of the Hastings Beds, belonged to sauropods.

Tunbridge Wells Sand Formation

Tunbridge Wells SandsGrinstead ClayTunbridge Wells sandstone
Some of these, four caudal vertebrae, BMNH R2544–2547, and three chevrons, BMNH R2548–2550, found around 1825 by John Kingdon near Cuckfield in the Tunbridge Wells Sand Formation of the Hastings Beds, belonged to sauropods.

Sandown Bay

baySandown Beach
Others however, including BMNH R10390, found near Sandown Bay on the Isle of Wight, and BMNH R2133 and R2115, found near Hastings, actually belonged to some iguanodont.

Isle of Wight

IOWWightIsland
Others however, including BMNH R10390, found near Sandown Bay on the Isle of Wight, and BMNH R2133 and R2115, found near Hastings, actually belonged to some iguanodont.

Iguanodontia

iguanodontiguanodontianiguanodonts
Others however, including BMNH R10390, found near Sandown Bay on the Isle of Wight, and BMNH R2133 and R2115, found near Hastings, actually belonged to some iguanodont.

Alexander Gordon Melville

Alexander MelvilleAlexander Melville (anatomist)
Noticing Owen's mistake in assigning iguanodont bones to Cetiosaurus, comparative anatomist Alexander Melville renamed the sauropod bones Cetiosaurus conybeari in 1849.

Gideon Mantell

Gideon Algernon MantellMantellGideon A. Mantell
In 1850, Gideon Mantell decided that ''C.