Pembina, North Dakota

PembinaFort PembinaPembina, NDPembina, Dakota TerritoryPembina SettlementPembina-areathe oldest settlement
Pembina is a city in Pembina County, North Dakota, United States.wikipedia
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Interstate 29

I-29Interstate 3129
Interstate 29 passes on the west side of Pembina, leading north to the Canada–US border at Emerson, Manitoba and south to the cities of Grand Forks and Fargo.
I-29 runs from Kansas City, Missouri, at a junction with Interstate 35 and Interstate 70, to the Canada–US border near Pembina, North Dakota, where it connects with Manitoba Highway 75.

Pembina–Emerson Border Crossing

Pembina-Emerson Border Crossingborder crossingCanada-United States border at Emerson
The Pembina-Emerson Border Crossing is the busiest between Blaine, Washington and Detroit, Michigan and the fifth busiest along the Canada-United States border.
The Pembina–Emerson Border Crossing connects the city of Pembina, North Dakota and community of Emerson, Manitoba.

Pembina County, North Dakota

Pembina CountyPembinaBowesmont, North Dakota
Pembina is a city in Pembina County, North Dakota, United States.
Pembina, the oldest European-American settlement in the future state, was the county seat.

Emerson, Manitoba

EmersonTown of EmersonWest Lynne
Interstate 29 passes on the west side of Pembina, leading north to the Canada–US border at Emerson, Manitoba and south to the cities of Grand Forks and Fargo.
The towns of St. Vincent, Minnesota and Pembina, North Dakota are located just a few kilometers south of the border in the United States.

North Dakota

NDNorthState of North Dakota
Pembina is a city in Pembina County, North Dakota, United States. It is one of three 24-hour ports of entry in North Dakota, the others being Portal and Dunseith.
Pembina was a town of many Norwegians when it was founded; they worked on family farms.

Dunseith, North Dakota

DunseithDunseith, NDSunseith
It is one of three 24-hour ports of entry in North Dakota, the others being Portal and Dunseith.
The port of entry at the Peace Garden is one of three 24-hour ports in North Dakota (the others being Portal and Pembina).

Portal, North Dakota

PortalPortal, ND
It is one of three 24-hour ports of entry in North Dakota, the others being Portal and Dunseith.
It is one of three year-round, 24-hour ports in North Dakota (the others being Dunseith and Pembina).

Motor Coach Industries

MCIMCI 102A2MCI D4505
Pembina is home to the U.S. satellite plant of Motor Coach Industries, which completes assembly of intercity buses.
In 1963 a new plant was opened in Pembina, North Dakota to increase capacity as MCI began to expand into the U.S. market, while Greyhound widened its operations and switched increasingly from GMC to its own in-house products.

Noyes, Minnesota

Noyes
The Emerson-Noyes border crossing, located 2 mi to the east on the Minnesota side of the Red River, also processed cross border traffic until its closure in 2006.
Travelers must now use the border crossing located less than two miles to the west, but a seven-mile trek from Noyes, through Pembina, North Dakota to Interstate 29.

Red River cart

Red River ox cartRed River ox cartsox cart
Through much of the nineteenth century, Métis families used the two-wheeled Red River ox cart trains to travel into the Great Plains, where the men would hunt bison and women would process the meat, skins, and bones.
According to the journal of North West Company fur-trader Alexander Henry the younger, the carts made their first appearance in 1801 at Fort Pembina, just south of what is now the Canada–United States border.

Métis buffalo hunt

buffalo huntersPemmicanannual buffalo hunt
In 1823 William H. Keating described a group of buffalo hunters he encountered at Pembina by the Red River.

KCND-TV

KCND
Despite its small size, Pembina maintained a television station, KCND-TV, from 1960 to 1975.
KCND-TV was a television station which broadcast from Pembina, North Dakota, United States from 1960 to 1975, targeting the Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada market some 60 miles (100 kilometres) to the north.

Assiniboia

District of AssiniboiaProvisional District of AssiniboiaAssiniboia Club
the Hudson's Bay Company (HBC), the Red River Colony, Battle of Seven Oaks, the Red River Rebellion, Assiniboia, and Manitoba.
The actual area of settlement, centered at present-day Winnipeg, was limited to the Red River valley between Lower Fort Garry and Pembina, North Dakota, and the Assiniboine River valley between Winnipeg and Portage la Prairie, Manitoba.

Norman Kittson

Kittson, Norman WolfredNorman W. KittsonNorman Wolfred Kittson
In 1844, maintaining a large degree of independence, Kittson established a permanent post at Pembina, North Dakota, where he made his headquarters.

Red River Trails

Red River TrailCrow Wing TrailWoods Trail
All parts were used for clothing, tepees, etc. Their regular trade routes became known as the Red River Trails.
The large fur companies also built posts, including the North West Company's stations at Pembina and St. Joseph in the valley of the Red River.

CKND-DT

CKND-TVCKNDGlobal Winnipeg
The station was a border blaster primarily targeting Winnipeg from as close to the border as possible; when simultaneous substitution rules took effect in the early 1970s, Canadian interests bought the intellectual property of the station and relocated it to Winnipeg, where it was relicensed by the Canadian government as CKND-TV and has operated there ever since.
It went on the air in Pembina, North Dakota on channel 12 in November 1960.

Red River Rebellion

Red River Resistance1869Riel Rebellion
the Hudson's Bay Company (HBC), the Red River Colony, Battle of Seven Oaks, the Red River Rebellion, Assiniboia, and Manitoba.
On November 2 under the command of Ambroise-Dydime Lépine, the Métis turned back McDougall's party near the United States border and forced them to retreat to Pembina, Dakota Territory.

KVRR

KNRRKBRRKJRR
Channel 12 in Pembina was rechristened as KNRR, a satellite of KVRR.
The station's programming is simulcast on three full-power satellite stations: KJRR (VHF channel 7) in Jamestown, North Dakota, KBRR (VHF channel 10) in Thief River Falls, Minnesota (serving Grand Forks) and KNRR (VHF channel 12) in Pembina, North Dakota (which also covers parts of southern Manitoba, Canada, including Winnipeg).

Stephen Harriman Long

Stephen H. LongStephen LongMajor Stephen H. Long
That year United States Army Major Stephen H. Long's survey of the 49th parallel revealed Pembina's location to be just south of the Rupert's Land – United States border.
The 1823 expedition encouraged American traders to push into the fur trade in Northern Minnesota and Dakota, and fostered the development of the Red River Trails and a colorful chapter of ox cart trade between the Red River Colony and Fort Garry via Pembina and the newly developing towns of Mendota and St. Paul.

Simultaneous substitution

simsubsimsubbingsimsubbed
The station was a border blaster primarily targeting Winnipeg from as close to the border as possible; when simultaneous substitution rules took effect in the early 1970s, Canadian interests bought the intellectual property of the station and relocated it to Winnipeg, where it was relicensed by the Canadian government as CKND-TV and has operated there ever since.
Examples include most of the stations in the Buffalo, New York television market, which targeted Toronto and the Golden Horseshoe region, and in the most extreme case, Pembina, North Dakota station KCND-TV (channel 12), which was based in a town with fewer than 1,000 residents but made its money by targeting the much larger city of Winnipeg across the border to its north.

St. Vincent, Minnesota

St. VincentSaint Vincent
The city of St. Vincent, Minnesota lies adjacent to the east, across the Red River.
The city of Pembina, North Dakota borders it on the west, across the Red River of the North.

Border blaster

border-blasterborder radioblasted back across the border
The station was a border blaster primarily targeting Winnipeg from as close to the border as possible; when simultaneous substitution rules took effect in the early 1970s, Canadian interests bought the intellectual property of the station and relocated it to Winnipeg, where it was relicensed by the Canadian government as CKND-TV and has operated there ever since.
(WIVB did not make significant attempts to reach the Canadian market, although rival station WKBW-TV did.) Another famous U.S.-based border blaster into Canada was KCND-TV in Pembina, North Dakota; Pembina was a small border town of less than 1,000 residents, which normally would be far too small of a market to support a television station, but spent its fifteen-year existence targeting Winnipeg, a much larger city sixty miles north of Pembina.

Battle of Grand Coteau (North Dakota)

Battle of Grand Coteau
The St. Boniface group made rendezvous with the Pembina group on June 16 then traveled west to meet the St. François Xavier group (June 19).

Pembina River (Manitoba – North Dakota)

Pembina RiverPembina River (North Dakota)Pembina River Gorge
The noted American author Louise Erdrich has represented the Pembina River and the Pembina Band of the Ojibwe Indians on the Turtle Mountain Reservation in numerous works of fiction.
It joins the Red River from the west just south of Pembina, approximately 2 mi south of the international border.

Pembina State Museum

The Pembina State Museum is a North Dakota State Historical Society-owned museum in Pembina, North Dakota.