Pennsylvania Railroad

PRRPennsylvaniaPennsylvania Railroad CompanyDelaware RailroadPennsylvania Rail RoadPennsylvania and New York RailroadPennsylvania Railroad (PRR)The Pennsylvania Railroad Company1968 mergerkeystone
The Pennsylvania Railroad (reporting mark PRR, legal name The Pennsylvania Railroad Company, also known as the "Pennsy") was an American Class I railroad that was established in 1846 and was headquartered in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.wikipedia
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Main Line (Pennsylvania Railroad)

Main LinePennsylvania Railroad Main LinePRR Main Line
US passenger carrier Amtrak received the electrified segment of the Main Line east of Harrisburg.
The Main Line of the Pennsylvania Railroad was a rail line in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, connecting Philadelphia with Pittsburgh via Harrisburg.

Penn Central Transportation Company

Penn CentralPenn Central RailroadPenn Central Transportation
In 1968, the Pennsylvania Railroad merged with rival New York Central to form the Pennsylvania New York Central Transportation Company, or "Penn Central" for short, which filed for bankruptcy within two years.
It was created by the 1968 merger of the Pennsylvania and New York Central railroads.

New York Central Railroad

New York CentralHudson River RailroadNew York Central and Hudson River Railroad
Its only formidable rival was the New York Central (NYC), which carried around three-quarters of the Pennsy's ton-miles.
In 1968 the NYC merged with its former rival, the Pennsylvania Railroad, to form Penn Central.

Harrisburg, Pennsylvania

HarrisburgHarrisburg, PAHarrisburg, Pa.
The first was for a new railroad called The Pennsylvania Railroad Company to build a line between Harrisburg and Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.
During part of the 19th century, the building of the Pennsylvania Canal and later the Pennsylvania Railroad allowed Harrisburg to become one of the most industrialized cities in the Northeastern United States.

Conrail

Consolidated Rail CorporationCRbailouts of the railroad industry
Bankruptcy continued and on April 1, 1976, the viable parts of Penn Central, along with the assets of several other failing northeastern railroads, were transferred to a new company named Consolidated Rail Corporation, or Conrail for short.
The two remaining Class I railroads in the East, CSX Transportation and the Norfolk Southern Railway (NS), agreed in 1997 to acquire the system and split it into two roughly-equal parts (alongside three residual shared-assets areas), returning rail freight competition to the Northeast by essentially undoing the 1968 merger of the Pennsylvania Railroad and New York Central Railroad that created Penn Central.

John Edgar Thomson

J. Edgar ThomsonThomson, John Edgar
In 1847, the Pennsy's directors chose J. Edgar Thomson, an engineer from the Georgia Railroad, to survey and construct the line.
Thomson was an entrepreneur best known for his leadership of the Pennsylvania Railroad (PRR) from 1852 until his death 1874, making it the largest business enterprise in the world and a world-class model for technological and managerial innovation.

Altoona, Pennsylvania

AltoonaAltoona, PAAltoona Speedway
He chose a route that followed the west bank of the Susquehanna River northward to the confluence with the Juniata River, following its banks until the foothills of the Allegheny Mountains were reached at a point that would become Altoona, Pennsylvania.
Altoona was founded by the Pennsylvania Railroad (PRR) in 1849 as the site for a shop and maintenance complex.

Northeast Corridor

NortheastShore LineAmtrak Northeast Corridor
Penn Central rail lines, including ex-Pennsy lines, were transferred to Conrail in 1976, and eventually Amtrak received the Northeast Corridor and Keystone Corridor lines.
The route was later consolidated under two railroads: the New York, New Haven and Hartford Railroad (NYNH&H) between Boston and New York, and the Pennsylvania Railroad (PRR) between New York and Washington.

Pittsburgh

Pittsburgh, PennsylvaniaPittsburgh, PACity of Pittsburgh
The first was for a new railroad called The Pennsylvania Railroad Company to build a line between Harrisburg and Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.
The South Side was once the site of the Pennsylvania Railroad railyards and associated dense, inexpensive housing for mill and railroad workers.

Reporting mark

reporting marksList of reporting marksVehicle Keeper Marking
The Pennsylvania Railroad (reporting mark PRR, legal name The Pennsylvania Railroad Company, also known as the "Pennsy") was an American Class I railroad that was established in 1846 and was headquartered in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
Similarly, during the breakup of Conrail, the long-retired marks of the Pennsylvania Railroad (PRR) and New York Central Railroad (NYC) were temporarily brought back and applied to much of Conrail's fleet to signify which cars and locomotives were to go to CSX (all cars labeled NYC) and which to Norfolk Southern (all cars labeled PRR).

John B. Thayer

John Borland ThayerJohn Borland Thayer IIJohn Thayer
John Borland Thayer II (April 21, 1862 – April 15, 1912) was an American businessman who had a thirty-year career as an executive with the Pennsylvania Railroad Company.

Keystone Corridor

KeystoneAmtrak Keystone Servicecorridor
Penn Central rail lines, including ex-Pennsy lines, were transferred to Conrail in 1976, and eventually Amtrak received the Northeast Corridor and Keystone Corridor lines.
The corridor was originally the Main Line of the Pennsylvania Railroad.

Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway

Santa Fe RailroadAtchison, Topeka and Santa Fe RailroadSanta Fe
At the end of 1926, it operated 11,640.66 mi of rail line; in the 1920s, it carried nearly three times the traffic as other railroads of comparable length, such as the Union Pacific and Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe railroads.
In 1960, AT&SF bought the Toledo, Peoria & Western Railroad (TP&W), then sold a half interest to the Pennsylvania Railroad (PRR).

1943 Frankford Junction train wreck

Frankford Junction train wreck1943 Frankford Junction train wreck (United States)An accident at Frankford Junction, Pennsylvania
The Frankford Junction train wreck occurred on September 6, 1943, when Pennsylvania Railroad's premier train, the Congressional Limited, crashed at Frankford Junction in the Kensington neighborhood of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in the United States, killing 79 people and injuring 117 others.

George Brooke Roberts

George B. RobertsGeorge RobertsRoberts
George Brooke Roberts (January 15, 1833 – January 30, 1897) was a civil engineer and the fifth president of the Pennsylvania Railroad (1880–96).

Alexander Cassatt

Alexander J. CassattA. J. CassattAlexander Johnston Cassatt
Alexander Johnston Cassatt (December 8, 1839 – December 28, 1906) was the seventh president of the Pennsylvania Railroad (PRR), serving from June 9, 1899, to December 28, 1906.

Samuel Rea

Rea, Samuel
Samuel Rea (September 21, 1855 – March 24, 1929) was an American engineer and the ninth president of the Pennsylvania Railroad, serving from 1913 to 1925.

Thomas A. Scott

Thomas Alexander ScottThomas ScottTom Scott
He became the fourth president of the Pennsylvania Railroad (1874–1880), which became the largest publicly traded corporation in the world and received much criticism for his conduct in the Great Railway Strike of 1877 and as a "robber baron."

Samuel Vaughan Merrick

Samuel Vaughn MerrickSamuel V. MerrickMerrick
Samuel Vaughan Merrick (1801–1870) was a 19th-century American manufacturer, and the first president of the Pennsylvania Railroad.

James M. Symes

Symes, James H.
James Miller Symes (July 8, 1897 – August 3, 1976), was the 13th president of the Pennsylvania Railroad.

Martin W. Clement

Clement, Martin W.
Martin Withington Clement (December 5, 1881 – August 30, 1966) was the 11th President of the Pennsylvania Railroad (PRR), from 1935 to 1948.

Allen J. Greenough

Greenough, Allen J.
Allen J. Greenough (September 20, 1905 – September 22, 1974) was the 14th and last President of the Pennsylvania Railroad.

Gallitzin Tunnel

Gallitzin TunnelsAllegheny TunnelAllegheny/Gallitzin Tunnels
The crest of the mountain would be penetrated by the 3612 feet Gallitzin Tunnels and then descended by a more moderate grade to Johnstown.
They were completed in 1854, 1855, and 1902 by the Pennsylvania Railroad as part of the cross-state route that includes the nearby Horseshoe Curve to the east.

Frank Thomson

Thomson, Frank
Frank Thomson (1841–1899) was a railroad executive from the United States, and the sixth president of the Pennsylvania Railroad (PRR).