Pennsylvania Station (New York City)

Penn StationPennsylvania StationNew York Penn StationNew YorkNew York CityPennPenn Station New YorkMoynihan StationNew York Pennsylvania StationNew York Penn
Pennsylvania Station, also known as New York Penn Station or Penn Station, is the main intercity railroad station in New York City and the busiest in the Western Hemisphere, serving more than 600,000 passengers per weekday.wikipedia
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Madison Square Garden

Madison Square GardensMadison Square Garden (IV)New York City
Entirely underground, the station is located in Midtown South beneath Madison Square Garden, between Seventh and Eighth Avenues, and between 31st and 33rd Streets, with additional exits to nearby streets.
Located in Midtown Manhattan between 7th and 8th Avenues from 31st to 33rd Streets, it is situated atop Pennsylvania Station.

Empire State Building

The Empire State BuildingEmpire State350 Fifth Avenue
Penn Station is in Midtown Manhattan, close to Herald Square, the Empire State Building, Koreatown, and Macy's Herald Square.
The building stands within a mile of other major Midtown tourist attractions including Grand Central Terminal, Pennsylvania Station, Madison Square Garden, Koreatown, and Macy's Herald Square.

East River Tunnels

East RiverEast River Railway Tunnelstunnels
Penn Station has 21 tracks fed by seven tunnels (the two North River Tunnels, the four East River Tunnels, and the single Empire Connection tunnel).
The East River Tunnels are four single-track railroad tunnels that extend from the eastern end of Pennsylvania Station under 32nd and 33rd Streets in Manhattan and cross the East River to Long Island City in Queens.

North River Tunnels

tunnelsHudsonHudson River Tunnel
Penn Station has 21 tracks fed by seven tunnels (the two North River Tunnels, the four East River Tunnels, and the single Empire Connection tunnel).
The North River Tunnels are a pair of tunnels that carry Amtrak and New Jersey Transit rail lines under the Hudson River between Weehawken, New Jersey and Pennsylvania Station in Manhattan, New York City.

Midtown South

southern Manhattan
Entirely underground, the station is located in Midtown South beneath Madison Square Garden, between Seventh and Eighth Avenues, and between 31st and 33rd Streets, with additional exits to nearby streets.
The Empire State Building, the Flatiron Building, Pennsylvania Station, Madison Square Garden, the Macy's Herald Square flagship store, Koreatown, and NYU Langone Medical Center are all arguably located in Midtown South.

List of busiest railway stations in North America

ninth-busiesttenth-busiestbusiest
Pennsylvania Station, also known as New York Penn Station or Penn Station, is the main intercity railroad station in New York City and the busiest in the Western Hemisphere, serving more than 600,000 passengers per weekday.

Pennsylvania Station (1910–1963)

Pennsylvania StationPenn StationNew York Penn Station
The current facility is the remodeled underground remnant of the original Pennsylvania Station, a more ornate station building designed by McKim, Mead, and White and considered a masterpiece of the Beaux-Arts style.
The station contained 11 platforms serving 21 tracks, in approximately the same layout as the current Penn Station.

Long Island Rail Road

LIRRLong IslandLong Island Railroad
Intercity trains are operated by Amtrak, which owns the station, while commuter rail services are operated by the Long Island Rail Road (LIRR) and New Jersey Transit (NJT).
Movements in Amtrak territory are controlled by Penn Station Control Center or PSCC, run jointly by the LIRR and Amtrak.

Gateway Program (Northeast Corridor)

Gateway ProjectGateway ProgramGateway Tunnel
Future plans for Penn Station include adding railway platforms at the station's south end to accommodate two proposed Gateway Program tunnels.
The right-of-way runs between Newark Penn Station and New York Penn Station (NYP).

Midtown Manhattan

MidtownEast MidtownMidtown East
Penn Station is in Midtown Manhattan, close to Herald Square, the Empire State Building, Koreatown, and Macy's Herald Square.
Pennsylvania Station and Grand Central Terminal are the two major railroad stations located in Midtown Manhattan.

Grand Central Terminal

Grand Central StationGrand CentralTerminal City
The rival New York Central Railroad's line ran down Manhattan from the north under Park Avenue and terminated at Grand Central Depot (later Grand Central Station, now Terminal) at 42nd Street.
The terminal is the third-busiest train station in North America, after New York Penn Station and Toronto Union Station.

Northeast Corridor

NortheastShore LineAmtrak Northeast Corridor
It is at the center of the Northeast Corridor, a passenger rail line that connects New York City with Boston, Philadelphia, Washington, D.C., and intermediate points.
At the same time, the PRR was building its Pennsylvania Station and electrified approaches, which were served by the PRR's lines in New Jersey and the Long Island Rail Road (LIRR).

Exchange Place station (Pennsylvania Railroad)

Exchange PlaceJersey City BranchExchange Place Terminal
Until the early 20th century, the PRR's rail network terminated on the western side of the Hudson River (once known locally as the North River) at Exchange Place in Jersey City, New Jersey.
The rail terminal and its ferry slips were the main New York City station for the railroad until the opening in 1910 of New York Pennsylvania Station, made possible by the construction of the North River Tunnels.

Koreatown, Manhattan

KoreatownManhattanKorea Way
Penn Station is in Midtown Manhattan, close to Herald Square, the Empire State Building, Koreatown, and Macy's Herald Square.
Their success drew other Korean-owned businesses, sustained by increased immigration from Korea and tourist traffic from nearby Midtown Manhattan landmarks like the Empire State Building, Macy's Herald Square, the United Nations Headquarters, Penn Station, Madison Square Garden, the Garment District, and the Flower District.

34th Street (Manhattan)

34th Street34thWest 34th Street
In 1901, PRR president Alexander Cassatt announced the railroad's plan to enter New York City by tunneling under the Hudson and building a grand station on the West Side of Manhattan south of 34th Street.
Other structures, such as Pennsylvania Station, are located within one block of 34th Street.

New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission

New York City LandmarkLandmarks Preservation CommissionNew York City designated landmark
"One entered the city like a god. One scuttles in now like a rat,” the architectural historian Vincent Scully famously wrote of the original station. The controversy over the demolition of such a well-known landmark, and its deplored replacement, is often cited as a catalyst for the architectural preservation movement in the United States. New laws were passed to restrict such demolition. Within the decade, Grand Central Terminal was protected under the city's new landmarks preservation act, a protection upheld by the courts in 1978 after a challenge by Grand Central's owner, Penn Central.
The Commission was created in April 1965 by Mayor Robert F. Wagner Jr. following the destruction of Pennsylvania Station the previous year to make way for the construction of the current Madison Square Garden.

West Side Line

Empire ConnectionHudson River RailroadHudson River Railway Company
Penn Station has 21 tracks fed by seven tunnels (the two North River Tunnels, the four East River Tunnels, and the single Empire Connection tunnel).
North of Penn Station, from 34th Street, the line is used by Amtrak passenger service heading north via Albany to Toronto; Montreal; Niagara Falls and Buffalo, New York; Rutland, Vermont; and Chicago.

Philadelphia

Philadelphia, PennsylvaniaPhiladelphia, PACity of Philadelphia
It is at the center of the Northeast Corridor, a passenger rail line that connects New York City with Boston, Philadelphia, Washington, D.C., and intermediate points.
Philadelphia's 30th Street Station is the third-busiest Amtrak rail hub, following Penn Station in Manhattan and Union Station in Washington, D.C., carrying over 4 million inter-city rail passengers annually.

Cardinal (train)

CardinalCDAmtrak's tri-weekly ''Cardinal
The Lake Shore Limited and Cardinal to Chicago were truncated or rerouted because of this work.
The Cardinal is a thrice-weekly long distance passenger train operated by Amtrak between New York Penn Station and Chicago Union Station, with major intermediate stops at Philadelphia, Washington, D.C., Charlottesville, Charleston, Huntington, Cincinnati, and Indianapolis.

Crescent (train)

CrescentSouthern CrescentCrescent Limited
It operates 1377 mi daily between Pennsylvania Station in New York City and Union Passenger Terminal in New Orleans as train numbers 19 and 20.

Maple Leaf (train)

Maple LeafMLMaple Leaf (Amtrak)
The Maple Leaf is an international passenger train service operated by Amtrak and Via Rail between Pennsylvania Station in New York City and Union Station in Toronto via the Empire Corridor.

Empire Service

ESEmpireEmpire Connector
Hourly weekday service is available on the southern portion of the line between New York Penn Station and Albany–Rensselaer.

Empire Corridor

The tracks and platforms are also largely original, except for some work connecting the station to the West Side Rail Yard and the Amtrak Empire Corridor serving Albany and Buffalo, New York.
The line is electrified by both overhead catenary and top-contact third rail between Penn Station and 41st Street and by under-contact third rail between and.

Seventh Avenue (Manhattan)

Seventh AvenueSeventh7th Avenue
Entirely underground, the station is located in Midtown South beneath Madison Square Garden, between Seventh and Eighth Avenues, and between 31st and 33rd Streets, with additional exits to nearby streets.

Vermonter (train)

VermonterVTAmtrak Vermonter
The Vermonter is a passenger train operated by Amtrak between St. Albans, Vermont, and Washington, D.C., via New York City.