Penny (United States coin)

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The United States one-cent coin (symbol: ¢), often called the penny, is a unit of currency equaling one one-hundredth of a United States dollar.wikipedia
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United States dollar

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The United States one-cent coin (symbol: ¢), often called the penny, is a unit of currency equaling one one-hundredth of a United States dollar.
The act created a decimal currency by creating the following coins: tenth dollar, one-twentieth dollar, one-hundredth dollar.

Penny debate in the United States

Efforts to eliminate the penny in the United Statesefforts have been made to eliminate the pennyeliminating the penny from circulation
This pushed the mint to look for alternative metals again for the coin, and also brought the penny debate into more focus.
A debate exists within the United States government and American society at large over whether the one-cent coin, the penny, should be eliminated as a unit of currency in the United States.

1943 steel cent

steel centsteel pennies1943 cent
In 1943, at the peak of World War II, zinc-coated steel cents were made for a short time because of war demands for copper.
1943 steel cents are U.S. one-cent coins that were struck in steel due to wartime shortages of copper.

Fugio cent

Fugioproduced in 1787
The first U.S. cent was produced in 1787, and the cent has been issued primarily as a copper or copper-plated coin throughout its history.
On April 21, 1787, the Congress of the Confederation of the United States authorized a design for an official copper penny, later referred to as the Fugio cent because of its image of the Sun and its light shining down on a sundial with the caption, "Fugio" (Latin: I flee/fly, referring to time flying by).

Cent

The U.S. Mint's official name for the coin is "cent" and the U.S. Treasury's official name is "one cent piece".

United States cent mintage figures

Mintage figures for the penny can be found at United States cent mintage figures.
Below are the mintage figures for the United States cent.

Indian Head cent

centscentIndian head cents
The Lincoln cent is the current one-cent coin of the U.S. It was adopted in 1909 (which would have been Lincoln's 100th birthday), replacing the Indian Head cent. Bronze, 1909–1942. Initially the alloy of the Lincoln cent followed that established for this denomination with the Indian Head design in 1864, 95% copper and 2.5% tin and 2.5% zinc.
The Indian Head cent, also known as an Indian Head penny, was a one-cent coin ($0.01) produced by the United States Bureau of the Mint from 1859 to 1909.

Lincoln cent

Wheat centLincoln penny1943 Lincoln cents
The letters "VDB" stamped on the bottom sleeve of Abraham Lincoln represent the initials of Victor David Brenner, the primary designer of the Wheat cent.
The Lincoln cent (sometimes called the Lincoln penny) is a one-cent coin that has been struck by the United States Mint since 1909.

Large cent

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The first official mintage of the large cent was in 1793, and its production continued until 1857, when it was officially replaced by the modern-size one-cent coin (commonly called the penny).

United States Mint

U.S. MintUnited States Bureau of the MintUS Mint
The U.S. Mint's official name for the coin is "cent" and the U.S. Treasury's official name is "one cent piece".
In 1980, the P mint mark was added to all U.S. coinage except the cent.

Half cent (United States coin)

half centhalf-centshalf cents
It has been the lowest-value physical unit of U.S. currency since the abolition of the half-cent in 1857 (the abstract mill, which has never been minted, equal to a tenth of a cent, continues to see limited use in the fields of taxation and finance).
* Penny (United States coin), the second smallest denomination of United States coin minted

Abraham Lincoln

LincolnPresident LincolnPresident Abraham Lincoln
Its obverse has featured the profile of President Abraham Lincoln since 1909, the centennial of his birth.
Lincoln's portrait appears on two denominations of United States currency, the penny and the $5 bill.

Abraham Lincoln Bicentennial Commission

Abraham Lincoln BicentennialbicentennialGlobal Lincoln
This resulted in the mintage of four different coins showing scenes from Abraham Lincoln's life in honor of the bicentennial of his birth.

Lyndall Bass

The coin was designed by artist Lyndall Bass and sculpted by U.S. Mint sculptor-engraver Joseph Menna.
She is the designer of the 2010 penny known as the Union Shield Penny.

1974 aluminum cent

1974-D aluminum pennyAluminum centAluminum pattern
Aluminum was chosen, and over 1.5 million of these pennies were struck and ready for public release before ultimately being rejected.
The 1974 aluminum cent was a one-cent coin proposed by the United States Mint in 1973.

Copper

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Bronze, 1909–1942. Initially the alloy of the Lincoln cent followed that established for this denomination with the Indian Head design in 1864, 95% copper and 2.5% tin and 2.5% zinc.
Those who want to avoid the premiums of copper bullion alternatively store old copper wire, copper tubing or American pennies made before 1982.

Frank Gasparro

Frank Gasparro, then Assistant Engraver at the Philadelphia Mint, prepared the winning entry, selected from a group of 23 models that the engraving staff at the Mint had been asked to present for consideration.
Gasparro's first major successful coin design was his redesign of the reverse of the Lincoln cent as part of the 150th anniversary of the birth of Abraham Lincoln, while he was Assistant Engraver at the Philadelphia Mint.

Joseph Menna

Joseph F. Menna
The coin was designed by artist Lyndall Bass and sculpted by U.S. Mint sculptor-engraver Joseph Menna.
Menna sculpted the reverse of the 2010 Lincoln Cent.

Gilding metal

gildingGilding Metal (GM)
Starting in 1944, shell casings made of gilding metal were melted down by the United States Mint to be made into pennies.

Susan B. Anthony dollar

1979 dollar coinAnthony dollarAnthony Dollars
Until 1857 it was about the size of the current U.S. dollar coins (Susan B. Anthony through present dollars).
In 1980, the 'P' mint mark was added to all other circulating coins, except the cent, struck in Philadelphia.

Jarden Zinc Products

They are composed of an inner core alloy of 99.2% zinc and 0.8% copper with an outer plating of pure copper, for an overall composition of 97.5% zinc and 2.5% copper, and are minted on blanks produced for the Mint by an outside manufacturer (Jarden Zinc Products).
Jarden Zinc is also the manufacturer of planchets used in the production of the United States penny.

E pluribus unum

E PLURIBUS UNUM a traditional motto of the United StatesE Pluribus
Between these, in the center of the coin, are the denomination and UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, while curving around the upper border is the national motto, E Pluribus Unum, Latin for "From Many, One".
The 2009 and new 2010 penny features a new design on the back, which displays the phrase E pluribus unum in larger letters than in previous years.

1955 doubled die cent

1955 doubled die1955 doubled-die cent1955 Lincoln cent
This is known as the 1955 doubled die cent.
The 1955 doubled die cent is a die variety that occurred during production of the one cent coin at the United States Mint in 1955.

Ring cent

ring centsThe coin
The ring cent or holey cent was a one-cent pattern coin first struck in various compositions and designs between 1850 and 1851 as part of an experiment on producing a cent with a reduced weight and diameter, as the rising price of copper had caused cents to cost more than their face value to produce.