Pequawket

Pigwacket
The Pequawket (also Pigwacket and many other spelling variants, from Eastern Abenaki apíkwahki, "land of hollows") are a Native American subdivision of the Abenaki people who formerly lived near the headwaters of the Saco River in Carroll County, New Hampshire and Oxford County, Maine.wikipedia
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Abenaki

Abenaki peopleAbenakisAbnaki
The Pequawket (also Pigwacket and many other spelling variants, from Eastern Abenaki apíkwahki, "land of hollows") are a Native American subdivision of the Abenaki people who formerly lived near the headwaters of the Saco River in Carroll County, New Hampshire and Oxford County, Maine.

Abenaki language

AbenakiEastern AbenakiWestern Abenaki
The Pequawket (also Pigwacket and many other spelling variants, from Eastern Abenaki apíkwahki, "land of hollows") are a Native American subdivision of the Abenaki people who formerly lived near the headwaters of the Saco River in Carroll County, New Hampshire and Oxford County, Maine.
Amaseconti, Androscoggin, Kennebec, Maliseet, Ouarastegouiak, Passamaquoddy, Patsuiket, [[Penobscot, Pigwacket, Rocameca, Sokoni, and Wewenoc.

Fryeburg, Maine

FryeburgFryburg
Pequawket is also the Abenaki name for Fryeburg, Maine, and the Abenaki name for Kearsarge North mountain.
The area was once a major Abenaki Indian village known as Pequawket, meaning "crooked place," a reference to the large bend in the Saco River.

Kearsarge North

Kearsarge North MountainKiarsargePequawket Fire Tower
Pequawket is also the Abenaki name for Fryeburg, Maine, and the Abenaki name for Kearsarge North mountain.
The Pequawket are a subdivision of the Abenaki people who formerly lived in the area.

Native Americans in the United States

Native AmericanNative AmericansAmerican Indian
The Pequawket (also Pigwacket and many other spelling variants, from Eastern Abenaki apíkwahki, "land of hollows") are a Native American subdivision of the Abenaki people who formerly lived near the headwaters of the Saco River in Carroll County, New Hampshire and Oxford County, Maine.

Saco River

SacoriverRiver Swanckadocke
The Pequawket (also Pigwacket and many other spelling variants, from Eastern Abenaki apíkwahki, "land of hollows") are a Native American subdivision of the Abenaki people who formerly lived near the headwaters of the Saco River in Carroll County, New Hampshire and Oxford County, Maine.

Carroll County, New Hampshire

Carroll CountyCarrollNew Hampshire
The Pequawket (also Pigwacket and many other spelling variants, from Eastern Abenaki apíkwahki, "land of hollows") are a Native American subdivision of the Abenaki people who formerly lived near the headwaters of the Saco River in Carroll County, New Hampshire and Oxford County, Maine.

Oxford County, Maine

Oxford CountyOxfordOxford Counties
The Pequawket (also Pigwacket and many other spelling variants, from Eastern Abenaki apíkwahki, "land of hollows") are a Native American subdivision of the Abenaki people who formerly lived near the headwaters of the Saco River in Carroll County, New Hampshire and Oxford County, Maine.

Molly Ockett

Molly Ockett was a Pequawket woman known for her skills in medical healing in the early 19th century.

Battle of Pequawket

Lovewell's Fighta daylong battleBattle at Pequawket

Conway, New Hampshire

ConwayConway, NHConway Valley
The region was once home to the Pequawket Indians, an Algonquian Abenaki tribe.

Sweden, Maine

Sweden
This was once territory of the Abenaki tribe whose main village was at Pequawket (now Fryeburg).

Chief Paugus

Paugus was chief of the Pequawket tribe which lived along the Saco River in present-day Conway, New Hampshire, and Fryeburg, Maine.

Maine

MEState of MaineMaine, United States
The other Abenaki tribes suffered several severe defeats, particularly during Dummer's War, with the capture of Norridgewock in 1724 and the defeat of the Pequawket in 1725, which greatly reduced their numbers.

List of New Hampshire historical markers (26–50)

New Hampshire Historical Marker No. 30number 47New Hampshire Historical Marker 45: Cog Railway
"In several versions the legend's sequence relates the mysterious death of Chocorua's son while in the care of a settler named Campbell. Suspicious of the cause, the Pequawket chieftain took revenge on the settler's family. Then, in retaliation, Campbell killed Chocorua on the peak of the mountain now bearing the Indian's name."

Andover, Maine

Andover
The town was first settled in 1789 by Ezekiel Merrill and his family who were transported there from Bethel, Maine in canoes managed by members of the local Pequawket tribe.

North Conway, New Hampshire

North ConwayMt. Washington ValleyNorth Conway, NH
Early settlers called the area Pequawket (known colloquially as Pigwacket), adopting the name of the Abenaki Indian village which stretched down the Saco River to its stockaded center at Fryeburg, Maine.

Jean-Louis Le Loutre

Abbe Le LoutreAbbe LeLoutreFather Le Loutre
Wampanoag, Nauset, and Pequawket members were offered bounties for Mi'kmaq scalps and prisoners as part of their pay.

Gorham's Rangers

RangersGorhamGorham's Independent Company of Rangers
Gorham's Rangers was a Massachusetts provincial auxiliary company of New England Indians (mainly Wampanoag and Nauset, but also a few Pigwacket) led by Anglo-American officers and commanded by Captain John Gorham.

Aquadoctan

The Weirs
The site is documented through colonial reports to be substantially abandoned in 1696, when most of New Hampshire's remaining Native population withdrew to join the Pequawket at present-day Fryeburg, Maine.

Wampanoag

Wampanoag peopleWampanoagsWampanoag Tribe
The Kennebec, Pigwacket (Pequawkets), and Arosaguntacook from Maine joined in the war against the colonists.

Joseph Goreham

Joseph GorhamGorham's RangersMajor Joseph Gorham
Initially the rank and file members of the company were Wampanoag and Nauset Indians from southeastern Massachusetts, prized as much for their small-boat handling skills (learned in the whaling industry) as for their scouting and tracking skills, and also a handful of Pequawket Indians from Maine.