Perfect 10 (gymnastics)

perfect 10perfect 10sperfect scoreperfect score of 10.0perfect scores of 10perfect ten
A perfect 10 is a score of 10.00 for a single routine in artistic gymnastics, which was once thought to be unattainable—particularly at the Olympic Games—under the code of points set by the International Gymnastics Federation (FIG).wikipedia
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Nadia Comăneci

Nadia ComaneciComaneciComaneci Salto
It is generally recognized that the first person to score a perfect 10 at the Olympic Games was Romanian Nadia Comăneci, at the 1976 Games in Montreal.
Comăneci is the first gymnast to be awarded a perfect score of 10.0 at the Olympic Games, and then, at the same Games (1976 Summer Olympics in Montreal), she received six more perfect 10s en route to winning three gold medals.

1988 Summer Olympics

19881988 Seoul Olympics1988 Olympics
Other women who accomplished this feat at the Olympics include Nellie Kim, also in 1976, Mary Lou Retton in 1984, Daniela Silivaș and Yelena Shushunova in 1988, and Lavinia Miloșovici in 1992.

1976 Summer Olympics

19761976 Montreal Olympics1976 Montreal
It is generally recognized that the first person to score a perfect 10 at the Olympic Games was Romanian Nadia Comăneci, at the 1976 Games in Montreal.

Nellie Kim

Nelli KimKim
Other women who accomplished this feat at the Olympics include Nellie Kim, also in 1976, Mary Lou Retton in 1984, Daniela Silivaș and Yelena Shushunova in 1988, and Lavinia Miloșovici in 1992.
She was the second woman in Olympic history to earn a perfect 10 score and the first woman to score it on the vault and on the floor exercise, rivaling Nadia Comăneci, Ludmilla Tourischeva, and other strong competitors of the 1970s.

Béla Károlyi

Bela KarolyiBélaBela Károlyi
Comăneci's coach, Béla Károlyi, having defected to the United States in 1981, subsequently coached Mary Lou Retton to gold at the 1984 Olympics in Los Angeles, where she scored 10s in the vault and floor exercise.
One of his earliest protégés was Nadia Comăneci, the first gymnast to be awarded a perfect score.

Alexander Dityatin

Aleksandr DityatinDityatin
The first man to score a perfect 10 is considered to be Alexander Dityatin, at the 1980 Olympics in Moscow.
At the 1980 Summer Olympics, after years of being second to teammate Andrianov, 22-year-old Dityatin won a record eight medals in the Moscow Games where he won the all-around title and seven more medals, including two golds to add to his historic achievement of the perfect 10, a feat which had only been recorded by Romania's Nadia Comaneci and the Soviet Union's Nellie Kim in the Olympic Games by then.

Daniela Silivaș

Daniela SilivaşDaniela SilivasDaniela Silivas-Harper
Other women who accomplished this feat at the Olympics include Nellie Kim, also in 1976, Mary Lou Retton in 1984, Daniela Silivaș and Yelena Shushunova in 1988, and Lavinia Miloșovici in 1992.
She was the only gymnast, male or female, to medal in every single event at the 1988 Olympics, where she earned seven perfect 10 scores.

Aurelia Dobre

She is the 1987 world champion on the balance beam and the bronze medalist on the vault and floor exercise, as well, and scored five perfect 10s at these championships.

Věra Čáslavská

Vera CaslavskaVera CáslavskáVera Čáslavska
Although the code of points was based on a maximum of 10, until 1976 it was considered impossible to achieve a score of greater than 9.95, particularly at the Olympic Games (although Věra Čáslavská achieved perfect 10s in the 1967 European Championships, which were displayed on a manual scoreboard).
Čáslavská dominated the 1965 and 1967 European Championships, taking all five individual titles and scoring perfect scores of 10 in 1967.

Artistic gymnastics

artistic gymnastgymnastGymnastics
A perfect 10 is a score of 10.00 for a single routine in artistic gymnastics, which was once thought to be unattainable—particularly at the Olympic Games—under the code of points set by the International Gymnastics Federation (FIG).

Olympic Games

OlympicOlympicsOlympian
A perfect 10 is a score of 10.00 for a single routine in artistic gymnastics, which was once thought to be unattainable—particularly at the Olympic Games—under the code of points set by the International Gymnastics Federation (FIG).

Code of Points (artistic gymnastics)

Code of PointsCOP
A perfect 10 is a score of 10.00 for a single routine in artistic gymnastics, which was once thought to be unattainable—particularly at the Olympic Games—under the code of points set by the International Gymnastics Federation (FIG).

Mary Lou Retton

Other women who accomplished this feat at the Olympics include Nellie Kim, also in 1976, Mary Lou Retton in 1984, Daniela Silivaș and Yelena Shushunova in 1988, and Lavinia Miloșovici in 1992. Comăneci's coach, Béla Károlyi, having defected to the United States in 1981, subsequently coached Mary Lou Retton to gold at the 1984 Olympics in Los Angeles, where she scored 10s in the vault and floor exercise.

Yelena Shushunova

Elena ShushunovaShushunova
Other women who accomplished this feat at the Olympics include Nellie Kim, also in 1976, Mary Lou Retton in 1984, Daniela Silivaș and Yelena Shushunova in 1988, and Lavinia Miloșovici in 1992.

Lavinia Miloșovici

Lavinia MiloşoviciLavinia Milosovici
Other women who accomplished this feat at the Olympics include Nellie Kim, also in 1976, Mary Lou Retton in 1984, Daniela Silivaș and Yelena Shushunova in 1988, and Lavinia Miloșovici in 1992.

1992 Summer Olympics

19921992 Barcelona Olympics1992 Olympic Games
Other women who accomplished this feat at the Olympics include Nellie Kim, also in 1976, Mary Lou Retton in 1984, Daniela Silivaș and Yelena Shushunova in 1988, and Lavinia Miloșovici in 1992.

1980 Summer Olympics

19801980 Moscow Olympics1980 Olympic Games
The first man to score a perfect 10 is considered to be Alexander Dityatin, at the 1980 Olympics in Moscow.

Gymnastics at the 1924 Summer Olympics – Men's rope climbing

Rope climbingMen's rope climbing1924
(However, in the 1924 Paris Olympics, 22 men achieved a mark of 10 in rope-climbing, with one Albert Séguin getting a second 10 in the sidehorse vault, events that are no longer part of artistic gymnastics.)

Albert Séguin

(However, in the 1924 Paris Olympics, 22 men achieved a mark of 10 in rope-climbing, with one Albert Séguin getting a second 10 in the sidehorse vault, events that are no longer part of artistic gymnastics.)

Gymnastics at the 1924 Summer Olympics – Men's sidehorse vault

Sidehorse vaultMen's sidehorse vaultX
(However, in the 1924 Paris Olympics, 22 men achieved a mark of 10 in rope-climbing, with one Albert Séguin getting a second 10 in the sidehorse vault, events that are no longer part of artistic gymnastics.)

International Gymnastics Federation

FIGFédération Internationale de GymnastiqueInternational Federation of Gymnastics
A perfect 10 is a score of 10.00 for a single routine in artistic gymnastics, which was once thought to be unattainable—particularly at the Olympic Games—under the code of points set by the International Gymnastics Federation (FIG).

1967 European Women's Artistic Gymnastics Championships

1967 European ChampionshipsVI
Although the code of points was based on a maximum of 10, until 1976 it was considered impossible to achieve a score of greater than 9.95, particularly at the Olympic Games (although Věra Čáslavská achieved perfect 10s in the 1967 European Championships, which were displayed on a manual scoreboard).

Gymnastics at the 1976 Summer Olympics

six eventseight events1976
Prior to the 1976 Olympics in Montreal, Omega, the official timers, asked the International Olympic Committee how many digits it should allow on the electronic scoreboard, and were told that three digits would be sufficient, as a score of 10.00 would not be possible.

Omega SA

OmegaOmega WatchesLouis Brandt
Prior to the 1976 Olympics in Montreal, Omega, the official timers, asked the International Olympic Committee how many digits it should allow on the electronic scoreboard, and were told that three digits would be sufficient, as a score of 10.00 would not be possible.

International Olympic Committee

IOCOlympic MovementOlympic Committee
Prior to the 1976 Olympics in Montreal, Omega, the official timers, asked the International Olympic Committee how many digits it should allow on the electronic scoreboard, and were told that three digits would be sufficient, as a score of 10.00 would not be possible.