Perlocutionary act

perlocutionaryperlocutionary forceperlocutions
A perlocutionary act (or perlocutionary effect) is a speech act, as viewed at the level of its consequences, such as persuading, convincing, scaring, enlightening, inspiring, or otherwise affecting the listener.wikipedia
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Speech act

speech actsspeech act theoryIndirect speech act
A perlocutionary act (or perlocutionary effect) is a speech act, as viewed at the level of its consequences, such as persuading, convincing, scaring, enlightening, inspiring, or otherwise affecting the listener.
The contemporary use of the term goes back to J. L. Austin's development of performative utterances and his theory of locutionary, illocutionary, and perlocutionary acts.

Illocutionary act

illocutionaryillocutionary forceforce
This is contrasted with locutionary and illocutionary acts (which are levels of description, rather than classifications of speech acts).
The perlocutionary act (the actual effect), might be to cause somebody to pass the salt.

Locutionary act

locutionary
This is contrasted with locutionary and illocutionary acts (which are levels of description, rather than classifications of speech acts).
The term equally refers to the surface meaning of an utterance because, according to J. L. Austin's posthumous "How To Do Things With Words", a speech act should be analysed as a locutionary act (i.e. the actual utterance and its ostensible meaning, comprising phonetic, phatic and rhetic acts corresponding to the verbal, syntactic and semantic aspects of any meaningful utterance), as well as an illocutionary act (the semantic 'illocutionary force' of the utterance, thus its real, intended meaning), and in certain cases a further perlocutionary act (i.e. its actual effect, whether intended or not).

Claude Debussy

DebussyDebussy, ClaudeC. Debussy
As an example, consider the following utterance: "By the way, I have a CD of Debussy; would you like to borrow it?"

Proof (truth)

proofproveevidence
In the area of oral and written communication such as conversation, dialog, rhetoric, etc., a proof is a persuasive perlocutionary speech act, which demonstrates the truth of a proposition.

Coordinated management of meaning

Barnett PearceCMM
Though the speech act theory is much more detailed, it is important to have an understanding of both illocutionary and perlocutionary utterances.

J. L. Austin

John AustinAustinJohn L. Austin
Eliciting an answer is an example of what Austin calls a perlocutionary act, an act performed by saying something.

Hush (Buffy the Vampire Slayer)

HushGentlemenHush" (''Buffy the Vampire Slayer'' episode)
Jenkins and Stuart assert that through the loss of speech, the communication in "Hush" is transformed from the senseless locutionary to the perlocutionary: acts upon which ideas are conveyed into instant meaning and action.

Universal pragmatics

(1979:34) Central to the notion of speech acts are the ideas of illocutionary force and perlocutionary force, both terms coined by philosopher J.L. Austin.

Metalocutionary act

The term metalocutionary act originated as metalocution (Gibbon 1976, 1983) in functional descriptions of intonation in English and German, by analogy with locution (locutionary act), illocution (illocutionary act) and perlocution (perlocutionary act) in speech act theory.

Meaning (philosophy of language)

meaningtheory of meaningmeanings
He analysed the structure of utterances into three distinct parts: locutions, illocutions and perlocutions.

Eugene Nida

NidaEugene A. NidaEugene A. Nida Institute for Biblical Scholarship
Nida and Lawrence Venuti have proved that translation studies is a much more complex discipline than may first appear, with the translator having to look beyond the text itself to deconstruct on an intra-textual level and decode on a referential level—assessing culture-specific items, idiom and figurative language to achieve an understanding of the source text and embark upon creating a translation which not only transfers what words mean in a given context, but also recreates the impact of the original text within the limits of the translator's own language system (linked to this topic: George Steiner, the Hermeneutic Motion, pragmatics, field, tenor, mode and the locutionary, illocutionary and perlocutionary).