Permissive software licence

permissivepermissive licensepermissive free software licensepermissive free software licencepermissive free softwarepermissive licensespermissive software licensepermissively licensedpermissive free software licensesBSD-like
A permissive software license, sometimes also called BSD-like or BSD-style license, is a free-software license with minimal requirements about how the software can be redistributed.wikipedia
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MIT License

MITMIT/X11X11
Examples include the MIT License, BSD licenses, Apple Public Source License and the Apache license. Popular modern permissive licenses, as the MIT Licence, the 3-clause BSD licence, and the Zlib Licence, don't include advertising clauses and are compatible with many copyleft licenses.
The MIT License is a permissive free software license originating at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT).

Apache License

Apache 2.0ApacheApache License 2.0
Examples include the MIT License, BSD licenses, Apple Public Source License and the Apache license.
The Apache License is a permissive free software license written by the Apache Software Foundation (ASF).

Free software

freefree-softwarefreely
A permissive software license, sometimes also called BSD-like or BSD-style license, is a free-software license with minimal requirements about how the software can be redistributed.
They generally advocate permissive free-software licenses, which allow others to use the software as they wish, without being legally forced to provide the source code.

Copyleft

copyleft licenseweak copyleftby-nc-sa
The Open Source Initiative defines a permissive software license as a "non-copyleft license". It is a word play on copyright, copyleft and copy center.
Copyleft software licenses are considered protective or reciprocal, as contrasted with permissive free-software licenses.

Berkeley Software Distribution

BSDBSD Unix*BSD
The term was presented by computer scientist and Berkeley Software Distribution (BSD) contributor Marshall Kirk McKusick at a BSD conference in 1999.
In the 1980s, BSD was widely adopted by workstation vendors in the form of proprietary Unix variants such as DEC Ultrix and Sun Microsystems SunOS due to its permissive licensing and familiarity to many technology company founders and engineers.

Software license

licenselicensedlicenses
A permissive software license, sometimes also called BSD-like or BSD-style license, is a free-software license with minimal requirements about how the software can be redistributed.
Free and open-source licenses are commonly classified into two categories: Those with the aim to have minimal requirements about how the software can be redistributed (permissive licenses), and the protective share-alike (copyleft Licenses).

FreeBSD

*BSDFreeBSD ProjectLinux emulation
The FreeBSD project argues on the advantages of permissive licenses for companies and commercial use-cases: they say that they place only "minimal restrictions on future behavior" and argue that copyleft licenses are "legal time-bombs".
FreeBSD has similarities with Linux, with two major differences in scope and licensing: FreeBSD maintains a complete system, i.e. the project delivers a kernel, device drivers, userland utilities, and documentation, as opposed to Linux only delivering a kernel and drivers, and relying on third-parties for system software; and FreeBSD source code is generally released under a permissive BSD license, as opposed to the copyleft GPL used by Linux.

Zlib License

zlibzlib/libpng licenselibpng License
Popular modern permissive licenses, as the MIT Licence, the 3-clause BSD licence, and the Zlib Licence, don't include advertising clauses and are compatible with many copyleft licenses.
The zlib license is a permissive free software license which defines the terms under which the zlib software library can be distributed.

License compatibility

compatibleincompatiblecompatibility
Permissive licenses offer more extensive licence compatibility than copyleft licenses, which cannot always be freely combined and mixed.
This "one-way compatibility" characteristic has been criticized by the Apache Foundation, which licenses under the more permissive Apache license, such non-copyleft licenses being often less complicated and making for better license compatibility.

Copyright

copyright lawcopyrightscopyrighted
It is a word play on copyright, copyleft and copy center.
Further refinements to these definitions have resulted in categories such as copyleft and permissive.

GNU General Public License

GPLGNU GPLGPLv2
the MIT licence, a permissive license, is the most popular license in the FOSS domain before a copyleft one, the second placed GPLv2.
This is in distinction to permissive free software licenses, of which the BSD licenses and the MIT License are widely used examples.

Common Development and Distribution License

CDDLSun Studio product licenseCDDL 1.
Examples include the CDDL and MsPL.
Like the MPL, the CDDL is a weak copyleft license in-between GPL license and BSD/MIT permissive licenses, requiring only source code files under CDDL to remain under CDDL.

Free software license

free softwarefree software licencefree software licenses
Free-software license
These early licenses were of the "permissible " kind.

BSD licenses

BSDBSD license3-clause BSD license
Examples include the MIT License, BSD licenses, Apple Public Source License and the Apache license. Popular modern permissive licenses, as the MIT Licence, the 3-clause BSD licence, and the Zlib Licence, don't include advertising clauses and are compatible with many copyleft licenses.
BSD licenses are a family of permissive free software licenses, imposing minimal restrictions on the use and distribution of covered software.

Public-domain-equivalent license

public domain equivalent licensepublic domain like licensepublic domain
Public domain equivalent license
This is achieved by a public-domain waiver statement and a fall-back all-permissive license, for cases where the waiver is not valid.

Free and open-source software

free and open-sourcefree and open source softwarefree and open source
While always an important part of the free and open-source software (FOSS) license landscape, since around 2010, several authors noted a raising popularity of the permissive licenses in contrast to the copyleft license.
Apple, a user of GCC and a heavy user of both DRM and patents, switched the compiler in its Xcode IDE from GCC to Clang, which is another FOSS compiler but is under a permissive license.

Comparison of free and open-source software licenses

free software licensescomparisonfree and open source software licenses
Comparison of free and open-source software licenses
The OSI recommends a mix of permissive and copyleft licenses, the Apache License 2.0, 2- & 3-clause BSD license, GPL, LGPL, MIT license, MPL 2.0, CDDL and EPL.

Apple Public Source License

APSLApple Public Source
Examples include the MIT License, BSD licenses, Apple Public Source License and the Apache license.

Open Source Initiative

OSIOpen Source Initiative (OSI)open technologies
The Open Source Initiative defines a permissive software license as a "non-copyleft license".

GitHub

github.comGistOctocat
GitHub's choosealicense website described the MIT permissive license as, "lets people do anything they want with your code as long as they provide attribution back to you and don’t hold you liable."

Attribution (copyright)

attributionattributedattribution of authorship
GitHub's choosealicense website described the MIT permissive license as, "lets people do anything they want with your code as long as they provide attribution back to you and don’t hold you liable."

California Western School of Law

California Western University
California Western School of Law's newmediarights.com defined them as follows: "The ‘BSD-like’ licenses such as the BSD, MIT, and Apache licenses are extremely permissive, requiring little more than attributing the original portions of the licensed code to the original developers in your own code and/or documentation."

Computer scientist

computer science professioncomputer-scientist
The term was presented by computer scientist and Berkeley Software Distribution (BSD) contributor Marshall Kirk McKusick at a BSD conference in 1999.

Marshall Kirk McKusick

Kirk McKusickM. Kirk McKusickM. McKusick
The term was presented by computer scientist and Berkeley Software Distribution (BSD) contributor Marshall Kirk McKusick at a BSD conference in 1999.

Word play

wordplayplay on wordsplay
It is a word play on copyright, copyleft and copy center.