Persian Gulf Residency

British Residency of the Persian Gulfformer British protectorateBritish ResidentChief political resident of the Persian GulfBritish Political ResidentPolitical ResidentBritish Residency AgentPolitical Resident in the Persian GulfBritish administration of the lower Persian GulfBritish Agent
The Persian Gulf Residency was an official colonial subdivision (i.e., residency) of the British Raj from 1763 until 1947 (and remained British protectorates after Indian independence in 1947, up to 1971), whereby the United Kingdom maintained varying degrees of political and economic control over several states in the Persian Gulf, including what is today known as the United Arab Emirates (formerly called the "Trucial States") and at various times southern portions of Persia, Bahrain, Kuwait, Oman, and Qatar.wikipedia
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Residency (country subdivision)

residencyHistoric residencyresidencies
The Persian Gulf Residency was an official colonial subdivision (i.e., residency) of the British Raj from 1763 until 1947 (and remained British protectorates after Indian independence in 1947, up to 1971), whereby the United Kingdom maintained varying degrees of political and economic control over several states in the Persian Gulf, including what is today known as the United Arab Emirates (formerly called the "Trucial States") and at various times southern portions of Persia, Bahrain, Kuwait, Oman, and Qatar.

British Raj

British IndiaIndiaBritish rule
The Persian Gulf Residency was an official colonial subdivision (i.e., residency) of the British Raj from 1763 until 1947 (and remained British protectorates after Indian independence in 1947, up to 1971), whereby the United Kingdom maintained varying degrees of political and economic control over several states in the Persian Gulf, including what is today known as the United Arab Emirates (formerly called the "Trucial States") and at various times southern portions of Persia, Bahrain, Kuwait, Oman, and Qatar.
The Trucial States of the Persian Gulf and the states under the Persian Gulf Residency were theoretically princely states as well as presidencies and provinces of British India until 1947 and used the rupee as their unit of currency.

Persian Gulf

GulfGulf regionPersian Gulf region
The Persian Gulf Residency was an official colonial subdivision (i.e., residency) of the British Raj from 1763 until 1947 (and remained British protectorates after Indian independence in 1947, up to 1971), whereby the United Kingdom maintained varying degrees of political and economic control over several states in the Persian Gulf, including what is today known as the United Arab Emirates (formerly called the "Trucial States") and at various times southern portions of Persia, Bahrain, Kuwait, Oman, and Qatar.
From 1763 until 1971, the British Empire maintained varying degrees of political control over some of the Persian Gulf states, including the United Arab Emirates (originally called the Trucial States) and at various times Bahrain, Kuwait, Oman, and Qatar through the British Residency of the Persian Gulf.

Trucial States

Trucial CoastTrucial StateTrucial Oman
The Persian Gulf Residency was an official colonial subdivision (i.e., residency) of the British Raj from 1763 until 1947 (and remained British protectorates after Indian independence in 1947, up to 1971), whereby the United Kingdom maintained varying degrees of political and economic control over several states in the Persian Gulf, including what is today known as the United Arab Emirates (formerly called the "Trucial States") and at various times southern portions of Persia, Bahrain, Kuwait, Oman, and Qatar.
The Trucial States Council was a forum for the leaders of the emirates to meet, presided over by the British Political Agent.

Bandar Abbas

Bandar-AbbasBandarabbasBandar-e Abbas
In return, the British East India Company ("the Company") was permitted to establish a trading post in the coastal city of Bandar 'Abbās, which became their principal port in the Persian Gulf.
The Omanis threatened to blockade Persia, but the British resident at Bushir convinced them to back down.

British protectorate

protectorateBritish protectoratesprotected state
The Persian Gulf Residency was an official colonial subdivision (i.e., residency) of the British Raj from 1763 until 1947 (and remained British protectorates after Indian independence in 1947, up to 1971), whereby the United Kingdom maintained varying degrees of political and economic control over several states in the Persian Gulf, including what is today known as the United Arab Emirates (formerly called the "Trucial States") and at various times southern portions of Persia, Bahrain, Kuwait, Oman, and Qatar.

Samuel Hennell

He was the British Political Resident for the Persian Gulf from 1838 – 1852 and described by Professor JB Kelly as: 'without doubt the greatest Political Resident Britain has ever had in the Persian Gulf.'

James Adair Crawford

James Adair Crawford was a civil servant of the British Empire, in 1893 he served as the Chief political resident of the Persian Gulf (which included Bahrain, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, and the Trucial States).

James Hayes Sadler (colonial administrator)

James Hayes SadlerSir James SadlerSir James Hayes Sadler
In 1893 and again from 1893-94, he was Chief political resident of the Persian Gulf (for Bahrain, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, and the Trucial States).

John Gordon Lorimer (civil servant)

J.G. LorimerJ. G. LorimerJohn Gordon Lorimer
Working for the British Raj in Punjab and the Northwest frontier province, he later served in the Persian Gulf region as British Political Resident.

General Maritime Treaty of 1820

General Maritime Treatymaritime truce1820 General Maritime Treaty
This threat generated a British military expedition in 1819, which crushed the Qawasim confederation and resulted in ratification of the "General Treaty of Peace" on 5 January 1820.

Geoffrey Arthur

Sir Geoffrey ArthurGeoffrey George Arthur
From 1970 to 1971, he was the last Political Resident in the Persian Gulf and oversaw the break up of the British territory in the Persian Gulf into the independent states of Bahrain, Qatar, and the United Arab Emirates.

Lewis Pelly

Sir Lewis PellyLieutenant General Sir Lewis PellyLieutenant General Sir Lewis Pelly KCSI
Next, he was transferred back to Persia as Political Resident (1862 to 1872).

George Middleton (diplomat)

Sir George MiddletonGeorge Humphrey MiddletonGeorge Middleton
He was also Chief Political Resident in the Persian Gulf Residency and Chargé d'affaires in Iran during the Abadan Crisis.

Rupert Hay

William Rupert HaySir Rupert Hay
He was Resident in Waziristan 1940–41, Resident in the Persian Gulf 1941–42, Revenue and Judicial Commissioner in Balochistan 1942–43 and Agent to the Governor-General, Resident and Chief Commissioner in Balochistan 1943–46.

Indian Independence Act 1947

Indian independenceindependenceIndian Independence Act
The Persian Gulf Residency was an official colonial subdivision (i.e., residency) of the British Raj from 1763 until 1947 (and remained British protectorates after Indian independence in 1947, up to 1971), whereby the United Kingdom maintained varying degrees of political and economic control over several states in the Persian Gulf, including what is today known as the United Arab Emirates (formerly called the "Trucial States") and at various times southern portions of Persia, Bahrain, Kuwait, Oman, and Qatar.

Iran

PersiaIslamic Republic of IranIranian
The Persian Gulf Residency was an official colonial subdivision (i.e., residency) of the British Raj from 1763 until 1947 (and remained British protectorates after Indian independence in 1947, up to 1971), whereby the United Kingdom maintained varying degrees of political and economic control over several states in the Persian Gulf, including what is today known as the United Arab Emirates (formerly called the "Trucial States") and at various times southern portions of Persia, Bahrain, Kuwait, Oman, and Qatar.

Bahrain

Kingdom of BahrainBahreinBHR
The Persian Gulf Residency was an official colonial subdivision (i.e., residency) of the British Raj from 1763 until 1947 (and remained British protectorates after Indian independence in 1947, up to 1971), whereby the United Kingdom maintained varying degrees of political and economic control over several states in the Persian Gulf, including what is today known as the United Arab Emirates (formerly called the "Trucial States") and at various times southern portions of Persia, Bahrain, Kuwait, Oman, and Qatar.

Kuwait

State of KuwaitKuwaitiKWT
The Persian Gulf Residency was an official colonial subdivision (i.e., residency) of the British Raj from 1763 until 1947 (and remained British protectorates after Indian independence in 1947, up to 1971), whereby the United Kingdom maintained varying degrees of political and economic control over several states in the Persian Gulf, including what is today known as the United Arab Emirates (formerly called the "Trucial States") and at various times southern portions of Persia, Bahrain, Kuwait, Oman, and Qatar.

Oman

Sultanate of OmanOmaniOmani Empire
The Persian Gulf Residency was an official colonial subdivision (i.e., residency) of the British Raj from 1763 until 1947 (and remained British protectorates after Indian independence in 1947, up to 1971), whereby the United Kingdom maintained varying degrees of political and economic control over several states in the Persian Gulf, including what is today known as the United Arab Emirates (formerly called the "Trucial States") and at various times southern portions of Persia, Bahrain, Kuwait, Oman, and Qatar.

Qatar

QatariState of QatarQAT
The Persian Gulf Residency was an official colonial subdivision (i.e., residency) of the British Raj from 1763 until 1947 (and remained British protectorates after Indian independence in 1947, up to 1971), whereby the United Kingdom maintained varying degrees of political and economic control over several states in the Persian Gulf, including what is today known as the United Arab Emirates (formerly called the "Trucial States") and at various times southern portions of Persia, Bahrain, Kuwait, Oman, and Qatar.

Presidencies and provinces of British India

British IndiaIndiaBritish
British interest in the Persian Gulf originated in the sixteenth century and steadily increased as British India's importance rose in the imperial system of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries.

Empire

imperialempiresimperial power
British interest in the Persian Gulf originated in the sixteenth century and steadily increased as British India's importance rose in the imperial system of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries.

Abbas the Great

Abbas IShah Abbas IAbbas I of Persia
Realizing the region's significance, the British fleet supported the Persian emperor Shāh Abbās in expelling the Portuguese from Hormuz Island in 1622.

Capture of Ormuz (1622)

Capture of OrmuzOrmuzAbbas retook
Realizing the region's significance, the British fleet supported the Persian emperor Shāh Abbās in expelling the Portuguese from Hormuz Island in 1622.