Persianate society

PersianatePersianate societiesPersianate statesPersianizedPersian culturePersian literary and high cultureculturally Persianizedinfluenced by Persian culturePersianPersian society
A Persianate society is a society that is based on or strongly influenced by the Persian language, culture, literature, art and/or identity.wikipedia
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Ghaznavids

Ghaznavid EmpireGhaznavidGhaznavid dynasty
The Persianate culture that emerged under the Samanids in Greater Khorasan, in northeast Persia and the borderlands of Turkistan exposed the Turks to Persianate culture; The incorporation of the Turks into the main body of the Middle Eastern Islamic civilization, which was followed by the Ghaznavids, thus began in Khorasan; "not only did the inhabitants of Khurasan not succumb to the language of the nomadic invaders, but they imposed their own tongue on them. The region could even assimilate the Turkic Ghaznavids and Seljuks (11th and 12th centuries), the Timurids (14th and 15th centuries), and the Qajars (19th and 20th centuries).
The Ghaznavid dynasty ( ġaznaviyān) was a Persianate Muslim dynasty of Turkic mamluk origin, at their greatest extent ruling large parts of Iran, Afghanistan, much of Transoxiana and the northwest Indian subcontinent from 977 to 1186.

Persian literature

PersianPersian poetryliterature
A Persianate society is a society that is based on or strongly influenced by the Persian language, culture, literature, art and/or identity.
At the same time, not all literature written in Persian is written by ethnic Persians or Iranians, as Turkic, Caucasian, and Indic poets and writers have also used the Persian language in the environment of Persianate cultures.

Khwarazmian dynasty

Khwarezmid EmpireKhwarezmian EmpireKhwarazmian
The Khwarazmian (English: ) dynasty was a Persianate Sunni Muslim dynasty of Turkic mamluk origin.

Timurid Empire

TimuridTimuridsEmperor
The Timurid Empire (, Timuriyān), self-designated as Gurkani (, Gurkāniyān meaning "son-in-law" of Genghisids), was a Persianate Turco-Mongol empire comprising modern-day Uzbekistan, Iran, the southern Caucasus, Mesopotamia, Afghanistan, much of Central Asia, as well as parts of contemporary India, Pakistan, Syria and Turkey.

Ottoman Empire

OttomanOttomansTurks
They revived Sassanid architecture, build grand mosques and elegant charbagh gardens, collected books (one Safavid ruler had a library of 3,000 volumes), and patronized "Men of the Pen" The Safavids introduced Shiism into Persia to distinguish Persian society from the Ottomans, their Sunni archrivals to the west.
Although initially the dynasty was of Turkic origin, it was Persianised in terms of language, culture, literature and habits.

Qutb Shahi dynasty

Qutb ShahiGolconda SultanateGolconda
It was initially a highly Persianate Muslim Turkmen dynasty established in the 16th century that eventually adopted the regional culture of the Deccan (Telugu culture, language and the newly developed Deccani dialect of Urdu).

Islamic culture

IslamicMuslim cultureIslamic tradition
It was a mixture of Persian and Islamic cultures that eventually underwent Persification and became the dominant culture of the ruling and elite classes of Greater Iran, Asia Minor, and South Asia.
At the same time, not all literature written in Persian is written by ethnic Persians or Iranians, as Turkic, Caucasian, and Indic poets and writers have also used the Persian language in the environment of Persianate cultures.

Persianization

PersianizedPersianisedPersianizing
It was a mixture of Persian and Islamic cultures that eventually underwent Persification and became the dominant culture of the ruling and elite classes of Greater Iran, Asia Minor, and South Asia.
Persianization or persification, is a sociological process of cultural change in which something becomes "Persianate".

Mahmud of Ghazni

MahmudSultan Mahmud GhaznaviMahmud of Ghaznavid
The crowning literary achievement in the early New Persian language was the Shahnameh (Book of Kings), presented by its author Ferdowsi to the court of Mahmud of Ghazni (998–1030).
Highly Persianized, Mahmud continued the bureaucratic, political, and cultural customs of his predecessors, the Samanids, which proved to establish the groundwork for a Persianate state in northern India.

Seljuq dynasty

Seljuk TurksSeljukSeljuks
The Persianate culture that emerged under the Samanids in Greater Khorasan, in northeast Persia and the borderlands of Turkistan exposed the Turks to Persianate culture; The incorporation of the Turks into the main body of the Middle Eastern Islamic civilization, which was followed by the Ghaznavids, thus began in Khorasan; "not only did the inhabitants of Khurasan not succumb to the language of the nomadic invaders, but they imposed their own tongue on them. The region could even assimilate the Turkic Ghaznavids and Seljuks (11th and 12th centuries), the Timurids (14th and 15th centuries), and the Qajars (19th and 20th centuries). Examples of pre-19th-century Persianate societies were the Seljuq, Timurid, Mughal, and Ottoman dynasties, as well as the Qarmatians who entertained Persianate notions of cyclical time even though they did not invoke the Iranian genealogies in which these precepts had converged.
The Seljuq dynasty, or Seljuqs ( Al-e Saljuq), was an Oghuz Turk Sunni Muslim dynasty that gradually became a Persianate society and contributed to the Turco-Persian tradition in the medieval West and Central Asia.

Marshall Hodgson

IslamicateMarshall G.S. HodgsonMarshall G. S. Hodgson
The term "Persianate" is a neologism credited to Marshall Hodgson.
Hodgson also resituated the geographical locus of Islam; he shifted attention away from an exclusive focus on Arab Islam that had characterized the Euro-American study of the religion to include the Persianate society (his coinage), which shaped Muslim thought and practice from the Middle Period onward.

Timur

TamerlaneTimur LenkAmir Timur
The Mongols under Genghis Khan (1220–58) and Timur (Tamerlane, 1336–1405) stimulated the development of Persianate culture in Central and West Asia, because of the new concentrations of specialists of high culture created by the invasions.
Timur (Chagatai: undefined Temür "Iron"; 9 April 1336 – 17–19 February 1405), later Timūr Gurkānī, sometimes spelled Taimur and historically best known as Amir Timur or Tamerlane ( Temūr(-i) Lang, "Timur the Lame"), was a Turco-Mongol Persianate conqueror who founded the Timurid Empire in and around modern-day Iran and Central Asia, becoming the first ruler of the Timurid dynasty.

Rumi

MevlanaJalaluddin RumiJalal ad-Din Muhammad Rumi
Apart from Ferdowsi, Rumi, Abu Ali Sina, Al-Biruni, Unsuri Balkhi, Farrukhi Sistani, Sanayi Ghaznawi and Abu Sahl Testari were among the great Iranian scientists and poets of the period under Ghaznavid patronage.
Rumi lived most of his life under the Persianate Seljuk Sultanate of Rum, where he produced his works and died in 1273AD.

Persian language

PersianNew PersianFarsi
A Persianate society is a society that is based on or strongly influenced by the Persian language, culture, literature, art and/or identity.
It is also spoken natively in the Tajik variety by a significant population within Uzbekistan, as well as within other regions with a Persianate history in the cultural sphere of Greater Iran.

Sayyid dynasty

SayyidSultanate of DelhiDelhi Sultanate of South Asia

Timurid dynasty

TimuridTimuridsHouse of Timur
The Persianate culture that emerged under the Samanids in Greater Khorasan, in northeast Persia and the borderlands of Turkistan exposed the Turks to Persianate culture; The incorporation of the Turks into the main body of the Middle Eastern Islamic civilization, which was followed by the Ghaznavids, thus began in Khorasan; "not only did the inhabitants of Khurasan not succumb to the language of the nomadic invaders, but they imposed their own tongue on them. The region could even assimilate the Turkic Ghaznavids and Seljuks (11th and 12th centuries), the Timurids (14th and 15th centuries), and the Qajars (19th and 20th centuries). Examples of pre-19th-century Persianate societies were the Seljuq, Timurid, Mughal, and Ottoman dynasties, as well as the Qarmatians who entertained Persianate notions of cyclical time even though they did not invoke the Iranian genealogies in which these precepts had converged.
Additionally, by adopting Islam, the Central Asian Turks and Mongols adopted the Persian literary and high culture which had dominated Central Asia since the early days of Islamic influence.

Shah

ShahanshahShahzadaShahzadi
Shah Isma'il's successors went further and adopted the title of Shāhanshāh (king of kings).
It was also used by Persianate societies such as the rulers and offspring of the Ottoman Empire (spelled as Şah and Şeh in the modern Turkish language), Mughal emperors of the Indian Subcontinent, the Bengal Sultanate, as well as in Afghanistan.

Delhi Sultanate

Sultanate of DelhiSultan of DelhiDelhi
The sultans of Delhi, who were of Turko-Afghan origin, modeled their lifestyles after the Persian upper classes.

Iran

PersiaIslamic Republic of IranIranian
This duality is symbolically expressed in the Shiite tradition that Husayn ibn Ali, the third Shi'ite Imam, had married Shahrbanu, daughter of Yazdegerd III, the last Sassanid king of Iran.
In spite of originating from the region of Persis (better known as Persia) in southwestern Iran, the Persian language was used and developed further through Persianate societies in Asia Minor, Central Asia, and South Asia, leaving massive influences on Ottoman and Mughal literatures, among others.

Indo-Persian culture

Indo-PersiancultureIndo-Persian cultural
The Mughals, who were of Turco-Mongol descent, strengthened the Indo-Persian culture, in South Asia.
In general, from its earliest days, aspects of the culture and language were brought to the Indian subcontinent by various Persianized Central Asian Turkic and Afghan rulers, such as Sultan Mahmud Ghaznavi in the 11th century.

Turkic peoples

TurkicTurksTurkish
The Safavids, who were of mixed Kurdish, Turkic, Georgian, Circassian and Pontic Greek ancestry, moved to the Ardabil region in the 11th century.
The Ghaznavid dynasty ( ġaznaviyān) was a Persianate Muslim dynasty of Turkic mamluk origin, at their greatest extent ruling large parts of Iran, Afghanistan, much of Transoxiana and the northwest Indian subcontinent (part of Pakistan) from 977 to 1186.

Abbasid Caliphate

AbbasidAbbasidsAbbasid dynasty
Towards the end of the 7th century, the population began resenting the cost of sustaining the Arab caliphs, the Umayyads, and in the 8th century, a general Iranian uprising—led by Abu Muslim Khorrasani—brought another Arab family, the Abbasids, to the Caliph's throne.
Persianate customs were broadly adopted by the ruling elite, and they began patronage of artists and scholars.