A report on Peshwa and Sadashivrao Bhau

Extent of the Maratha Confederacy, 1795
Flag of the Maratha Empire.svg Maratha Confederacy at its zenith in 1760 (yellow areas)
Statue of Balaji Vishwanath, the first Peshwa from the Bhat family, at Shrivardhan, Raigad district, Maharashtra, India.
A portrait of Sadashivrao Bhau Peshwa, a part of Peshwa Memorial in Pune, India
Statue of Bajirao I, the second Peshwa from the Bhat family, outside Shaniwar Wada, Pune, Maharashtra, India.
An information plaque describing Sadashivrao Bhau. It is a part of The Peshwa Memorial atop Parvati Hill in Pune, India
Shaniwar Wada's Delhi Gate. It was the seat of the Peshwas at Pune, Maharashtra, India.
Ahmad Shah Durrani and his coalition decisively defeat the Maratha Confederacy, during the Third Battle of Panipat.
His Highness Shrimant Sawai Madhavrao Peshwa or Madhav Rao II Narayan and his Prime minister Nana Phadnavis, with two attendants at Pune.

He was the son of Peshwa Baji Rao's brother Chimaji Appa.

- Sadashivrao Bhau

Sadashivrao Bhau

- Peshwa

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c. 1770 Faizabad-style painting of the Third Battle of Panipat; the centre of the image is dominated by the twin arcs of the lines of guns firing at each other with smoke and destruction in between.

Third Battle of Panipat

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The Third Battle of Panipat took place on 14 January 1761 between the Maratha Empire and the invading army of the Durrani Afghan Empire.

The Third Battle of Panipat took place on 14 January 1761 between the Maratha Empire and the invading army of the Durrani Afghan Empire.

c. 1770 Faizabad-style painting of the Third Battle of Panipat; the centre of the image is dominated by the twin arcs of the lines of guns firing at each other with smoke and destruction in between.
Extent of the Maratha Empire, 1760
Sadashivrao Bhau
Engraving of a Maratha soldier by James Forbes.
Portrait of Ahmad Shah Durrani
Plan of the Third Battle of Panipat based on Kashi raja (Casi Raja) Pandit's account
Mahadaji Shinde restored Maratha domination over northern India, within a decade after the war.
Map of India in 1765, before the fall of Nawabs and Princely states nominally allied to the emperor (mainly in Green).

The Maratha army was led by Sadashivrao Bhau, who was third-highest authority of the Maratha Empire after the Chhatrapati and the Peshwa.

Maratha Empire

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Early modern Indian confederation that came to dominate much of the Indian subcontinent in the 18th century.

Early modern Indian confederation that came to dominate much of the Indian subcontinent in the 18th century.

The Maratha Empire in 1758 with the Nizam of Hyderabad and the Mughal Empire as its vassals
Maratha Empire at its peak in 1760 (Yellow)
Maratha kingdom in 1680 (yellow)
A portrait of Shivaji Maharaj
Sambhaji, eldest son of Shivaji
Peshwa Balaji Vishwanath
Peshwa Baji Rao I
Peshwa Balaji Bajirao
Peshwa Madhavrao I
Mahadaji Shinde restored the Maratha domination of northern India
A mural depicting the British surrender during the First Anglo-Maratha War. The mural is a part of the Victory Memorial (Vijay Stambh) located at Vadgaon Maval, Pune.
Peshwa Madhavrao II in his court in 1790, concluding a treaty with the British
Battle of Assaye during the Second Anglo-Maratha War
Peshwa Baji Rao II signing of the Treaty of Bassein with the British
Maratha king of Gwalior at his palace
Pratapgad fort, one of the earliest forts administered by Shivaji.
Maratha darbar or court.
Gold coins minted during Shivaji's era, 17th century.
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Maratha Gurabs ships attacking a British East India Company ship
Arms of Maratha
Ramchandra Pant Amatya
Thanjavur Maratha palace
Maratha Empire at its peak in 1759 (orange)
Maratha Empire in 1760 (yellow)
Maratha Empire in 1765 (yellow)
Maratha Empire in 1795 (yellow)
Maratha Empire in 1805
Maratha Princely States in 1823

The empire had its head in the Chhatrapati as de jure, but the de facto governance was in the hands of the Peshwas after Chhatrapati Shahu I's reign.

In 1760, the Marathas under Sadashivrao Bhau (referred to as the Bhau or Bhao in sources) responded to the news of the Afghans' return to North India by sending a large army north.

Govind Pant Bundela

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Govind Ballal Kher (1710 - 17 December 1760), historically known as Govind Pant Bundela, was a Military General of Peshwas in Northern India during 1733 to 1760.

Govind Pant did his best to help the Maratha army under the leadership of Sadashivrao Bhau during Battle of Panipat.

Malhar Rao Holkar, Contemporary Painting c. 1770 from Bundi, Rajasthan

Malhar Rao Holkar

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Noble subedar of the Maratha Empire, in present-day India.

Noble subedar of the Maratha Empire, in present-day India.

Malhar Rao Holkar, Contemporary Painting c. 1770 from Bundi, Rajasthan
Maratha Empire at its peak in 1758
Chhatri of Malhar Rao Holkar, built by his daughter-in-law Ahilya Bai Holkar, at Alampur, Madhya Pradesh.
Back view of Malhar Rao Holkar's Chhatrisamadhi at Alampur, Madhya Pradesh.

He was one of the early officers along with Ranoji Scindia to help spread the Maratha rule to northern states and was given the estate of Indore to rule by the Peshwas, during the reign of the Maratha emperor Shahu I.

He participated in the Third Battle of Panipat He along with Raja Surajmal is said to have advised Sadashivrao Bhau, Peshwa's cousin and the de facto commander of the Maratha army to leave all their heavy luggage, civilians and heavy static French made cannons in any of the Maratha forts behind the Chambal river and do the traditional Maratha guerilla warfare against the Afghans until they retreat from India.

Ibrahim Khan Gardi (Pashto origin) (left) with Sadashivrao Bhau

Ibrahim Khan Gardi

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Muslim general of Maratha Empire.

Muslim general of Maratha Empire.

Ibrahim Khan Gardi (Pashto origin) (left) with Sadashivrao Bhau

An expert in artillery, he initially served the Nizam of Hyderabad, before working for the Peshwa of the Maratha Empire.

He was a close confidant of the Peshwa as well as his cousin Sadashivrao Bhau, the commander-in-chief of the Maratha army during the Panipat military expedition.