Pet Sounds

album of the same nameThree Blind Mice" (instrumental)
Pet Sounds is the 11th studio album by the American rock band the Beach Boys, released May 16, 1966 on Capitol Records.wikipedia
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The Beach Boys

Beach BoysBeach BoyBeach Boils
Pet Sounds is the 11th studio album by the American rock band the Beach Boys, released May 16, 1966 on Capitol Records.
In 1966, the Pet Sounds album and "Good Vibrations" single raised the group's prestige as rock innovators and established the band as symbols of the nascent counterculture era.

Brian Wilson

BrianBedroom TapesWilson
The album was produced, arranged, and almost entirely composed by Brian Wilson with guest lyricist Tony Asher.
In 1964, he suffered a nervous breakdown and stopped touring with the group, which led to more personal work such as Pet Sounds (1966) and the unfinished Smile.

Wouldn't It Be Nice

Wouldn't It Be Nice (live)Skulle de' va' sköntWouldn't It Be Nice?
It was followed by two singles credited to the group: "Sloop John B" and "Wouldn't It Be Nice" (backed with "God Only Knows"). In 1994, Mike Love was awarded co-writing credits on "Wouldn't It Be Nice" and "I Know There's an Answer", but with the exception of his co-credit on "I'm Waiting for the Day", a song which had been written some two years earlier, his songwriting contributions are thought to have been minimal.
It was released as the opening track on their 1966 album Pet Sounds.

Sloop John B

The John B. SailsI Wanna Go HomeI Wanna Go Home (Wreck of the 'John B')
It was followed by two singles credited to the group: "Sloop John B" and "Wouldn't It Be Nice" (backed with "God Only Knows"). At the suggestion of bandmate Al Jardine, Wilson began working on "Sloop John B", a traditional Caribbean folk song that Jardine had learned from listening to the Kingston Trio.
The 1966 folk rock adaptation by the Beach Boys was produced and arranged by bandleader Brian Wilson and served as the lead single off their 11th studio album, Pet Sounds.

I Know There's an Answer

Hang On to Your EgoTerry Sachen
The album consisted mainly of introspective songs like "You Still Believe in Me" about faithfulness, "I Know There's an Answer", a critique of LSD users, and "I Just Wasn't Made for These Times", an autobiographical statement on social alienation (as well as the first use of a theremin-like instrument on a rock record).
"I Know There's an Answer" is a song by American rock band the Beach Boys, the 9th track on their 1966 album Pet Sounds.

Caroline, No

Caroline NoCaroline Novac
Lead single "Caroline, No" was issued as his official solo debut.
Two months later, Wilson's recording reappeared (now spelled "Caroline No") as the final track on the Beach Boys' studio album Pet Sounds.

Tony Asher

The album was produced, arranged, and almost entirely composed by Brian Wilson with guest lyricist Tony Asher.
Anthony D. Asher (born May 2, 1939) is an English-American jingle writer and lyricist who collaborated with Brian Wilson in the co-writing of eight songs on the Beach Boys 1966 album Pet Sounds, including the singles "God Only Knows", "Wouldn't It Be Nice", and "Caroline, No".

You Still Believe in Me

The album consisted mainly of introspective songs like "You Still Believe in Me" about faithfulness, "I Know There's an Answer", a critique of LSD users, and "I Just Wasn't Made for These Times", an autobiographical statement on social alienation (as well as the first use of a theremin-like instrument on a rock record).
"You Still Believe in Me" is a song written by Brian Wilson and Tony Asher for American rock band the Beach Boys, released as the second track on their 1966 album Pet Sounds.

Good Vibrations

Good VibrationGood Vibrations: 40th Anniversary EditionVibes
In October, the leftover song "Good Vibrations" was followed as a single and became a worldwide hit.
The song was not originally issued as a track from an album, but rather as a standalone single, with the Pet Sounds instrumental "Let's Go Away for Awhile" as the B-side.

I Just Wasn't Made for These Times

soundtrack
The album consisted mainly of introspective songs like "You Still Believe in Me" about faithfulness, "I Know There's an Answer", a critique of LSD users, and "I Just Wasn't Made for These Times", an autobiographical statement on social alienation (as well as the first use of a theremin-like instrument on a rock record).
Also produced and sung by Wilson, it appears as the eleventh track on their 1966 album Pet Sounds.

The Pet Sounds Sessions

In 1997, a "making-of" version of Pet Sounds was overseen by Wilson and released as The Pet Sounds Sessions, containing the album's first true stereo mix.
The Pet Sounds Sessions is a 4-CD box set released in 1997 which compiles tracks from the Beach Boys' 11th studio album Pet Sounds (1966) and its 1965–66 recording sessions.

God Only Knows

The Impossible OrchestraGod Only Knows (Promo)
It was followed by two singles credited to the group: "Sloop John B" and "Wouldn't It Be Nice" (backed with "God Only Knows").
"God Only Knows" is a song written by Brian Wilson and Tony Asher for American rock band the Beach Boys, released in May 1966 on the group's album Pet Sounds.

The Little Girl I Once Knew

In November 1965, "The Little Girl I Once Knew" was released as a non-album single.
AllMusic called the song "a virtual link between the slightly progressive work on songs such as 'California Girls' and the then-quantum leap taken by Wilson on Pet Sounds and 'Good Vibrations'".

Progressive rock

symphonic rockprogressiveprog rock
Combined with its innovative music, which was perceived as a wholly self-conscious artistic statement (or "concept"), the album was crucial to the development of progressive/art rock, bringing more attention to psychedelic music in the mainstream, and helping to elevate rock as a genre for listening, rather than dancing.
The same is said for the Beach Boys' Pet Sounds (1966), which Brian Wilson intended as an answer to Rubber Soul and which in turn influenced the Beatles when they made Sgt. Pepper.

I'm Waiting for the Day

In 1994, Mike Love was awarded co-writing credits on "Wouldn't It Be Nice" and "I Know There's an Answer", but with the exception of his co-credit on "I'm Waiting for the Day", a song which had been written some two years earlier, his songwriting contributions are thought to have been minimal.
"I'm Waiting for the Day" is a song written by Brian Wilson of the American rock band the Beach Boys, released as the fifth track on their 1966 album Pet Sounds.

Beach Boys' Party!

Beach Boys PartyPartyParty!
Wilson recorded a backing track on July 12, 1965, but after laying down a rough lead vocal, he set the song aside for some time, concentrating on the recording of what became their next LP, the informal studio jam Beach Boys' Party!, in response to their record company Capitol's request for a Beach Boys album for the Christmas 1965 market.
While the "beach party" atmospherics fit into the Beach Boys style to that point, the varied musical influences presaged the change of direction that would occur over the next several years beginning with Pet Sounds (1966).

Found object (music)

found soundfound objectfound objects
Wilson's Wall of Sound-based orchestrations mixed conventional rock set-ups with elaborate layers of vocal harmonies, found sounds, and instruments never before associated with rock, such as bicycle bells, French horn, flutes, Electro-Theremin, string sections, and beverage cans.
Found objects have occasionally been featured in very well known pop songs: "You Still Believe In Me" from the Beach Boys' Pet Sounds features bicycle bells and horns as part of the orchestral arrangements.

National Recording Registry

United States National Recording RegistryLibrary of Congress's National Recording Registry2006 entry
In 2004, Pet Sounds was preserved in the National Recording Registry by the Library of Congress for being "culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant."

Pet Sounds (instrumental)

Pet Soundsits title trackPet Sounds" (instrumental)
the other instrumental is the title track, "Pet Sounds".
"Pet Sounds" is an instrumental composed and produced by Brian Wilson and is the 12th track on the 1966 album Pet Sounds by American rock band the Beach Boys.

Chamber pop

chamber rockOrk-popchamber-pop
Genres attributed to the album include progressive pop, chamber pop, psychedelic pop, art rock, psychedelic rock, baroque pop, experimental rock, and avant-pop.
Artists such as Burt Bacharach and the Beach Boys' Brian Wilson (especially the band's 1966 album Pet Sounds) informed the genre's initial foundation.

The Beach Boys Today!

Today!Beach Boys Today
It is sometimes considered a Wilson solo album, repeating the themes and ideas he had introduced with The Beach Boys Today! one year earlier.
The album is described as a foreshadowing of the later Beach Boys' album Pet Sounds.

Let's Go Away for Awhile

One of them: the wistful "Let's Go Away for Awhile".
It was released as the sixth track on their 1966 album Pet Sounds, and is the first of two instrumentals that appear on the album, the other being its title track.

Concept album

conceptconcept albumsconcept record
Pet Sounds is regarded by musicologists as an early concept album that advanced the field of music production, introducing non-standard harmonies and timbres, and incorporating elements of pop, jazz, exotica, classical, and the avant-garde.
The author Carys Wyn Jones writes that the Beach Boys' Pet Sounds (1966), the Beatles' Revolver (1966) and Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band (1967), and the Who's Tommy (1969) are variously cited as "the first concept album", usually for their "uniform excellence rather than some lyrical theme or underlying musical motif".

Al Jardine

Alan JardineLive in Las VegasJardine
At the suggestion of bandmate Al Jardine, Wilson began working on "Sloop John B", a traditional Caribbean folk song that Jardine had learned from listening to the Kingston Trio.
It was at Jardine's suggestion that the Beach Boys recorded a cover of the Kingston Trio's folk standard Sloop John B, which Brian Wilson rearranged and produced for their Pet Sounds album in 1966.

The Wrecking Crew (music)

The Wrecking CrewWrecking CrewGene Estes
Wilson produced several backing tracks over a period lasting several months, using professional Hollywood recording studios and an ensemble that included the classically trained session musicians nicknamed "the Wrecking Crew", also known as the musicians frequently employed on Phil Spector's records.
The musicians were sometimes used as "ghost players" on recordings credited to rock groups, such as the Byrds' debut rendition of Bob Dylan's "Mr. Tambourine Man" (1965), the first two albums by the Monkees, and the Beach Boys' 1966 album Pet Sounds.