Peter, Paul and Mary

Peter, Paul & MaryPeter, Paul, and MaryPeter Paul and MaryPeter Paul & MaryPeter, Paul, & MaryList of Peter Paul & Mary songsPeter, PaulPeter, Paul & Mary,
Peter, Paul and Mary was an American folk group formed in New York City in 1961, during the American folk music revival phenomenon.wikipedia
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Peter Yarrow

The trio was composed of tenor Peter Yarrow, baritone Noel Paul Stookey and contralto Mary Travers.
Peter Yarrow (born May 31, 1938) is an American singer and songwriter who found fame with the 1960s folk music trio Peter, Paul and Mary.

Contemporary folk music

contemporary folkfolkfolk music
Peter, Paul and Mary was an American folk group formed in New York City in 1961, during the American folk music revival phenomenon.
Major changes occurred through the evolution of established performers such as Bob Dylan, Joan Baez, Judy Collins, and Peter Paul and Mary, and also through the creation of new fusion genres with rock and pop.

Paul Stookey

Noel Paul StookeyNoel StookeyNoel "Paul" Stookey
The trio was composed of tenor Peter Yarrow, baritone Noel Paul Stookey and contralto Mary Travers.
Stookey is known as "Paul" in the folk trio Peter, Paul and Mary; however, he has been known by his first name, Noel, throughout his life.

Mary Travers

TraversMary
The trio was composed of tenor Peter Yarrow, baritone Noel Paul Stookey and contralto Mary Travers.
Mary Allin Travers (November 9, 1936 – September 16, 2009) was an American singer-songwriter and member of the folk music group Peter, Paul and Mary, along with Peter Yarrow and Paul Stookey.

Pete Seeger

Peter SeegerSeegerPete
Mary Travers said she was influenced by Woody Guthrie, Pete Seeger, and the Weavers. It included "Lemon Tree", "500 Miles", and the Pete Seeger hit tunes "If I Had a Hammer" (subtitled "The Hammer Song") and "Where Have All the Flowers Gone?".
"If I Had a Hammer" was a hit for Peter, Paul and Mary (1962) and Trini Lopez (1963) while the Byrds had a number one hit with "Turn! Turn! Turn!"

American folk music revival

folk revivalfolk music revivalfolk
Peter, Paul and Mary was an American folk group formed in New York City in 1961, during the American folk music revival phenomenon.
The huge commercial success of the Kingston Trio, whose recordings between 1958 and 1961 earned more than $25 million for Capitol records or about $195 million in 2014 dollars spawned a host of groups that were similar in some respects like the Brothers Four, Peter, Paul and Mary, The Limeliters, The Chad Mitchell Trio, The New Christy Minstrels and more.

The Weavers

WeaversPaul Campbell
Mary Travers said she was influenced by Woody Guthrie, Pete Seeger, and the Weavers.
Their style inspired the commercial "folk boom" that followed them in the 1950s and 1960s, including such performers as The Kingston Trio, Peter, Paul, and Mary, The Rooftop Singers, The Seekers, and Bob Dylan.

Bob Dylan

DylanDylanesqueB. Dylan
The group's repertoire included songs written by Yarrow and Stookey, early songs by Bob Dylan as well as covers of other folk musicians.
The song was widely recorded by other artists and became a hit for Peter, Paul and Mary.

Albert Grossman

Albert Grossman ManagementAlbert P. Grossman
Manager Albert Grossman created Peter, Paul and Mary in 1961, after auditioning several singers in the New York folk scene, including Dave Van Ronk, who was rejected as too idiosyncratic and uncommercial, and Carolyn Hester.
He was famous as the manager of many of the most popular and successful performers of folk and folk-rock music, including Bob Dylan, Janis Joplin, Peter, Paul and Mary, the Band, Odetta, Gordon Lightfoot and Ian & Sylvia.

The Bitter End

Bitter EndThe Other EndCock 'n' Bull
After rehearsing Yarrow, Stookey and Travers out of town in Boston and Miami, Grossman booked them into The Bitter End, a coffee house, nightclub and popular folk music venue in New York City's Greenwich Village.
Also in 1992, the venue's landlord tried to evict the bar, with the venue saved by benefit performances by Peter, Paul, and Mary, Kris Kristofferson, George Carlin and others.

Peter, Paul and Mary (album)

Peter, Paul and Marydebut albumdebut self-titled album
The group recorded their debut album, Peter, Paul and Mary, and it was released by Warner Bros. the following year.
Peter, Paul and Mary is the first album by American music trio Peter, Paul and Mary, released in 1962 on Warner Bros. Records.

Vocal Group Hall of Fame

The Vocal Group Hall of Fame
The group was inducted into the Vocal Group Hall of Fame in 1999.

500 Miles

Five Hundred Miles500 Miles Away from Home500 Miles (Away From Home)
It included "Lemon Tree", "500 Miles", and the Pete Seeger hit tunes "If I Had a Hammer" (subtitled "The Hammer Song") and "Where Have All the Flowers Gone?".

If I Had a Hammer

If I Had a Hammer (The Hammer Song)The Hammer SongHammer Song
It included "Lemon Tree", "500 Miles", and the Pete Seeger hit tunes "If I Had a Hammer" (subtitled "The Hammer Song") and "Where Have All the Flowers Gone?". That year the group performed "If I Had a Hammer" and "Blowin' in the Wind" at the 1963 March on Washington, best remembered for the Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr.'s "I Have a Dream" speech.
It was a number 10 hit for Peter, Paul and Mary in 1962 and then went to number three a year later when recorded by Trini Lopez.

Puff, the Magic Dragon

Puff the Magic DragonPuff (The Magic Dragon)Honah Lee
In 1963 the group released "Puff, the Magic Dragon", with music by Yarrow and words based on a poem that had been written by a fellow student at Cornell, Leonard Lipton.
"Puff, the Magic Dragon" (or "Puff") is a song written by Leonard Lipton and Peter Yarrow, and made popular by Yarrow's group Peter, Paul and Mary in a 1962 recording released in January 1963.

Dave Van Ronk

Dave Van Ronk and the Hudson Dusters
Manager Albert Grossman created Peter, Paul and Mary in 1961, after auditioning several singers in the New York folk scene, including Dave Van Ronk, who was rejected as too idiosyncratic and uncommercial, and Carolyn Hester.
Van Ronk's voice and style were considered too idiosyncratic and the role eventually went to Noel Paul Stookey (who became the "Paul" in Peter, Paul and Mary).

Where Have All the Flowers Gone?

Where Have All the Flowers GoneGdzie są kwiaty z tamtych lat?Qui peut dire ou vont les fleurs?
It included "Lemon Tree", "500 Miles", and the Pete Seeger hit tunes "If I Had a Hammer" (subtitled "The Hammer Song") and "Where Have All the Flowers Gone?".

The Times They Are a-Changin' (song)

The Times They Are a-ChanginThe Times They Are a ChanginThe Times They Are A-Changing
They also sang other Dylan songs, such as "The Times They Are a-Changin'"; "Don't Think Twice, It's All Right," and "When the Ship Comes In."
The song has been covered by many different artists, including Nina Simone, the Byrds, the Seekers, Peter, Paul and Mary, Simon & Garfunkel, Runrig, the Beach Boys, Joan Baez, Phil Collins, Billy Joel, Bruce Springsteen and Burl Ives.

Lemon Tree (Will Holt song)

Lemon TreeEtz HaLimonLemon Tree" (Will Holt song)
It included "Lemon Tree", "500 Miles", and the Pete Seeger hit tunes "If I Had a Hammer" (subtitled "The Hammer Song") and "Where Have All the Flowers Gone?".
The song has been recorded by Peter, Paul and Mary, Chad & Jeremy, The Kingston Trio, The Seekers, Bob Marley and The Wailers, Herb Alpert and the Tijuana Brass, Sandie Shaw, and Roger Whittaker.

The Freewheelin' Bob Dylan

Talkin' World War III BluesFreewheelinSally Gal
Their success with Dylan's "Don't Think Twice, It's All Right" helped Dylan's The Freewheelin' Bob Dylan album rise into the top 30; it had been released four months earlier.
The album opens with "Blowin' in the Wind", which became an anthem of the 1960s, and an international hit for folk trio Peter, Paul & Mary soon after the release of Freewheelin.

Blowin' in the Wind

Blowin 'in the WindBlowin in the WindBlowing in the Wind
That year the group performed "If I Had a Hammer" and "Blowin' in the Wind" at the 1963 March on Washington, best remembered for the Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr.'s "I Have a Dream" speech.
"Blowin' in the Wind" was first covered by The Chad Mitchell Trio, but their record company delayed release of the album containing it because the song included the word death, so the trio lost out to Peter, Paul and Mary, who were represented by Dylan's manager, Albert Grossman.

Album 1700

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The track first appeared on their million-selling platinum certified Album 1700 in 1967 (which also contained their No.
Album 1700 is the seventh studio album by American folk music trio Peter, Paul and Mary, released in 1967.

Greenwich Village

Greenwich Village, New YorkGreenwich Village Historic DistrictGreenwich Village, Manhattan
After rehearsing Yarrow, Stookey and Travers out of town in Boston and Miami, Grossman booked them into The Bitter End, a coffee house, nightclub and popular folk music venue in New York City's Greenwich Village.
Dozens of other cultural and popular icons got their start in the Village's nightclub, theater, and coffeehouse scene during the 1950s, 1960s, and early 1970s, including Eric Andersen, Joan Baez, Jackson Browne, the Clancy Brothers and Tommy Makem, Richie Havens, Jimi Hendrix, Janis Ian, the Kingston Trio, the Lovin' Spoonful, Bette Midler, Liza Minnelli, Joni Mitchell, Maria Muldaur, Laura Nyro, Phil Ochs, Tom Paxton, Peter, Paul, and Mary, Carly Simon, Simon & Garfunkel, Nina Simone, Barbra Streisand, James Taylor, and the Velvet Underground.

Leaving on a Jet Plane

Jet PlaneLeavin' on a Jet Plane
In December 1969 "Leaving on a Jet Plane", written by the group's friend John Denver, became their only No.
"Leaving on a Jet Plane" is a song written by John Denver in 1966 and most famously recorded by Peter, Paul and Mary.

I Dig Rock and Roll Music

9 hit "I Dig Rock and Roll Music").
"I Dig Rock and Roll Music" is a 1967 song by the American folk group Peter, Paul and Mary, written by Paul Stookey, James Mason and Dave Dixon.