A report on Peter Cushing

Cushing as Victor Frankenstein in The Revenge of Frankenstein (1958)
Cushing as Victor Frankenstein in The Curse of Frankenstein
Cushing as Doctor Van Helsing in The Brides of Dracula
Cushing in Cash On Demand (1961)

English actor.

- Peter Cushing
Cushing as Victor Frankenstein in The Revenge of Frankenstein (1958)

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Hammer Film Productions

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British film production company based in London.

British film production company based in London.

Bray Studios, Berkshire. Bray Studios, close to the frequently-used filming location Oakley Court, was Hammer's principal base from 1951 to 1966.
John Van Eyssen as Jonathan Harker
Christopher Lee as the Creature in The Curse of Frankenstein (1957)
Christopher Lee in Dracula, a.k.a. Horror of Dracula (1958)

Peter Cushing was Hammer's pre-eminent star from the late 1950s to the mid-1970s and remains, along with Christopher Lee, the actor most commonly associated with the company; in Hammer films he played Baron Victor Frankenstein six times and Doctor Van Helsing five times, along with many other characters, both heroic and villainous.

Lee at the 2013 Berlinale

Christopher Lee

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English actor, author, and singer.

English actor, author, and singer.

Lee at the 2013 Berlinale
Flying Officer C. F. C. Lee in Vatican City, 1944, soon after the Liberation of Rome
Lee as the title character in Dracula (1958). Lee fixed the image of the fanged vampire in popular culture.
Lee as Kharis in The Mummy (1959)
Lee in The Oblong Box (1969)
Lee and his close friend Peter Cushing in Horror Express (1972)
Lee at Forbidden Planet, New Oxford Street, London, signing The Two Towers
Lee filming Marcus Warren's The Heavy in Westminster, London in 2007
Lee at the Berlin International Film Festival in February 2012
Lee receiving the "Spirit of Hammer" award for his album Charlemagne: By the Sword and the Cross at the 2010 Metal Hammer Golden Gods ceremony in London
Lee with his wife, Birgit Krøncke, March 2009

He frequently appeared opposite his friend Peter Cushing in horror films, and late in his career had roles in five Tim Burton films.

Peter Cushing as Grand Moff Tarkin

Grand Moff Tarkin

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Peter Cushing as Grand Moff Tarkin

Governor Wilhuff Tarkin is a fictional character in the Star Wars franchise, introduced in the original 1977 Star Wars film (played by Peter Cushing) as one of its two central villains, alongside Darth Vader.

On the set of Frankenstein Must Be Destroyed

Terence Fisher

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British film director best known for his work for Hammer Films.

British film director best known for his work for Hammer Films.

On the set of Frankenstein Must Be Destroyed
Christopher Lee as the creature in The Curse of Frankenstein (1957), a huge international success

His first major gothic horror film was The Curse of Frankenstein (1957), which launched Hammer's association with the genre and made British actors Peter Cushing and Christopher Lee leading horror stars of the era.

Theatrical release poster by Tom Jung

Star Wars (film)

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1977 American epic space opera film written and directed by George Lucas, produced by Lucasfilm and distributed by 20th Century Fox.

1977 American epic space opera film written and directed by George Lucas, produced by Lucasfilm and distributed by 20th Century Fox.

Theatrical release poster by Tom Jung
Luke Skywalker (Hamill), Princess Leia (Fisher), and Han Solo (Ford)
Director/writer George Lucas in 2007, describing the difficulty of pitching Star Wars, being turned down repeatedly, until 20th Century-Fox bought the idea for "a little strange" film.
Lucas's early plan was to buy the rights to the Flash Gordon film serials and comics of the 1930s and 1940s
Star Wars producer Gary Kurtz (pictured in 2002)
Ralph McQuarrie in 2008. Lucas commissioned him to create conceptual photographs for the film, which visualized the characters, costumes, props, and scenery.
Hotel Sidi Driss, the underground building in Matmata, Tunisia, used to film Luke's home
Tikal, Guatemala, which served as the setting of the Rebel base
Steven Spielberg said he was the only person in the audience to have enjoyed the film in its early cut screening.
Original vinyl release
Rendition of Dan Perri's original Star Wars logotype
Style ‘B’ poster
Style ‘C’ poster
A crowd outside Leicester Square Theatre the day after the film's premiere.
Introductory graphics for the film that feature Suzy Rice's Star Wars logotype; the film's cinematic re-release in 1981 added Episode IV and A New Hope to the head of the opening crawl.
The 20th anniversary theatrical release poster of the 1997 Special Edition (art by Drew Struzan)
Alec Guinness received multiple award nominations, including one from the Academy, for his performance as Obi-Wan Kenobi. To date, he is the only actor to receive an Academy Award nomination for a Star Wars film.
Composer John Williams received the Academy Award, BAFTA Award, Golden Globe Award and Saturn Award for Star Wars music
Filmmaker George Lucas received the directing (Academy Award, Directors Guild of America Award, Golden Globe Award, and Saturn Award) and writing (Academy Award, Saturn Award, and Writers Guild of America Award) nominations for Star Wars

The cast includes Mark Hamill, Harrison Ford, Carrie Fisher, Peter Cushing, Alec Guinness, David Prowse, James Earl Jones, Anthony Daniels, Kenny Baker, and Peter Mayhew.

UK quad poster

Daleks' Invasion Earth 2150 A.D.

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1966 British science fiction film directed by Gordon Flemyng and written by Milton Subotsky, and the second of two films based on the British science-fiction television series Doctor Who.

1966 British science fiction film directed by Gordon Flemyng and written by Milton Subotsky, and the second of two films based on the British science-fiction television series Doctor Who.

UK quad poster
UK quad poster

It stars Peter Cushing in a return to the role of the eccentric inventor and time traveller Dr. Who, Roberta Tovey as Susan, Jill Curzon as Louise and Bernard Cribbins as Tom Campbell.

Max Schreck as Count Orlok in the 1922 film Nosferatu. Critic and historian Kim Newman declared it as a film that set the template for the horror film.

Horror film

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Film genre that seeks to elicit fear or disgust in its audience for entertainment purposes.

Film genre that seeks to elicit fear or disgust in its audience for entertainment purposes.

Max Schreck as Count Orlok in the 1922 film Nosferatu. Critic and historian Kim Newman declared it as a film that set the template for the horror film.
Depiction of the usage of mirrors in horror films.
Bela Lugosi in Dracula (1931), a film noted as inspiring a wave of subsequent American horror films in the 1930s.
George A. Romero's Night of the Living Dead (1968) led to what Newman described as a "slow burning influence" in independent and thoughtful horror films in the 1970s.
Some cast and crew members of The Blair Witch Project (1999), one of the highest grossing horror films of the 1990s.
Park Chan-wook, the director of Thirst (2009), one of the many varied Korean horror films from the early 21st century.
French director Julia Ducournau (centre) won the Palme d'Or for horror film Titane. She is pictured with actors Agathe Rousselle and Vincent Lindon, who star in the film, at the 2021 Cannes Film Festival.
Jörg Buttgereit in 2015. Buttgereit was described by Kai-Uwe Werbeck as "arguably the most visible German horror director of the 1980s and early 1990s"
Still from Dario Argento's Suspiria (1977). Curti described the film as developing an "artistic rebirth" and "irrational dimension" to the Italian gothic from its "set pieces to the color and the music."
Filmmaker and composer John Carpenter, who has directed and scored numerous horror films, performing in 2016.
Cannibal Holocaust (1980) uses a found footage style.
Still of Madhubala in Mahal (1949), considered one of the first Indian horror films.

These films would birth two horror film stars: Christopher Lee and Peter Cushing and led to further horror film production from Hammer in the decade.

Theatrical release poster

The Mummy (1959 film)

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Theatrical release poster
Kharis, shot by Banning.
The sarcophagus prop in Perth Museum and Art Gallery.

The Mummy is a 1959 British horror film, directed by Terence Fisher and starring Peter Cushing and Christopher Lee.

Original theatrical banner

Dr. Who and the Daleks

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1965 British science fiction film directed by Gordon Flemyng and written by Milton Subotsky, and the first of two films based on the British science-fiction television series Doctor Who.

1965 British science fiction film directed by Gordon Flemyng and written by Milton Subotsky, and the first of two films based on the British science-fiction television series Doctor Who.

Original theatrical banner

It stars Peter Cushing as Dr. Who, Roberta Tovey as Susan, Jennie Linden as Barbara, and Roy Castle as Ian.

Theatrical release poster

The Abominable Snowman (film)

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1957 British fantasy-horror film directed by Val Guest and written by Nigel Kneale, based on his own BBC television play The Creature.

1957 British fantasy-horror film directed by Val Guest and written by Nigel Kneale, based on his own BBC television play The Creature.

Theatrical release poster
John Rollason (Peter Cushing) and Tom Friend (Forrest Tucker) in a scene from The Abominable Snowman. The claustrophobic feel created by Val Guest in the film is evident.
The "eyes of worldly understanding" of actor Fred Johnson used by Val Guest to convey the benign intelligence of the Yeti in the climactic scenes of the film.

Produced by Hammer Films, the plot follows the exploits of British scientist Dr. John Rollason (Peter Cushing), who joins an American expedition, led by glory-seeker Tom Friend (Forrest Tucker), to search the Himalayas for the legendary Yeti.